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MemberStefano Villani

Stefano Villani is Professor in Early Modern European History at the University of Maryland, College Park (associate professor at the University of Pisa until 2010). He has worked on the Quaker missions in the Mediterranean and published numerous articles and books in this area: Tremolanti e papisti (1996); Il calzolaio quacchero e il finto cadì (2001); A True Account of the Great Tryals and Cruel Sufferings Undergone by Those Two Faithful Servants of God, Katherine Evans and Sarah Cheevers (2003). More recently he has worked on the religious history of the English community in Livorno and on the Italian translations of the Book of Common Prayer and has published an intellectual biography of one of the Nineteenth-Century translators: George Frederick Nott (1768-1841). Un ecclesiastico anglicano tra teologia, letteratura, arte, archeologia, bibliofilia e collezionismo (Rome 2012). He has co-edited with Alison Yarrington and Julia Kelly the Proceedings of the conference ‘In Medias Res: British-Italian Cultural Transactions – British Academy Colloquium 3: Travels and Translations (Amsterdam/New York 2013).

MemberSusan Hollis Merritt

I earned my BA with Honors from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and my MA and PhD in English from Indiana University Bloomington.  My PhD dissertation, “Fantasy behind Play: A Study of Emotional Responses to Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party, The Caretaker and The Homecoming,” initiated my work in reader-response oriented theory, criticism, and pedagogy and developed into my broader scholarly and pedagogical interests in theory and criticism. For several decades I have taught courses in English and theater at universities and colleges in the United States and engaged in scholarly pursuits here and abroad. My research on the criticism of Harold Pinter’s work advanced significantly when I participated as a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow in the NEH Summer Seminar New Directions in Literary Study, directed by Professor Ralph Cohen, at the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville. Supported by an NEH Fellowship for College Teachers, I began my work on my book Pinter in Play: Critical Strategies and the Plays of Harold Pinter (1990; Duke UP, 1995). Following the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia, Harold Pinter’s support for Václav Havel, and subsequent political developments in the Czech Republic (discussed in chapter 8 on “Cultural Politics” and updated in my preface to the paperback edition of Pinter in Play), I studied Czech as a visiting scholar in the Institute for European Studies at Cornell University and traveled to Prague multiple times to do research on Czech productions of contemporary plays by Pinter and other playwrights writing in English. During the spring of 1997, I was a Fulbright Senior Scholar, hosted by the Czech Theatre Institute, and a research associate at Charles University, in Prague.  I also made many trips to London, to do research in the Harold Pinter Archive at the British Library and to attend theatrical productions and related events pertaining to Pinter and other playwrights. My teaching and research, including my regular participation in MLA Annual Conventions, led to my becoming a charter member of the Society for Critical Exchange (founded in 1975) and a founding Life Member of the Harold Pinter Society (founded in 1986; now called the International Harold Pinter Society), both Allied Organizations of the MLA. As founding Bibliographical Editor of The Pinter Review, I compiled the “Harold Pinter Bibliography” from 1987 through 2011, when it was published in conjunction with the Pinter Society by the University of Tampa and the University of Tampa Press. Having participated in MLA workshops on Digital Humanities (see my profile on DH Commons, linked below in “Projects”), I am exploring the feasibility of developing a searchable digital database for my “Harold Pinter Bibliography” compiled for The Pinter Review. A selected list of my publications (including 14 installments of the bibliography) appears below and in the CV section of my (archived) website, which I hope to update and re-locate to a new hosting service in the future. My academic interests include: Dramatic literature, criticism, and theory; Global politics and the cultural impact of contemporary drama and media; Human rights issues pertaining to cultural studies; Digital pedagogy and scholarship; Archival studies; and Critical bibliography.

MemberClaus Tieber

Principle investigator of several research projects. Habilitation (post-doc thesis) about the history of the American screenplay (Schreiben für Hollywood. Das Drehbuch im Studiosystem. Münster et al: Lit Verlag 2008), Publications about storytelling in silent cinema (Stummfilmdramaturgie. Erzählweisen des amerikanischen Feature Films 1917 – 1927. Münster et al: Lit Verlag 2011), Hindi cinema and filmmusic. Teaches film studies at universities in Vienna, Brno, Kiel and Salamanca

MemberMurat Öğütcü

My research interests include Shakespeare, cultural studies, adaptation studies (particularly animation studies), ecocriticism (particularly environmental justice movements), early modern history, and Anglo-Ottoman encounters in the early modern period. I received my PhD degree on Shakespeare’s history plays at Hacettepe University, Turkey, in 2016. From August 2012 to January 2013, I was a visiting scholar at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and worked there with Prof. Dr. Richard McCoy.   I am the General Editor of the “Turkish Shakespeares” Project that aims to introduce texts, productions and research on Turkish Shakespeares to a broader international audience of students, teachers, and researchers with blog entries, short descriptions and links to productions and adaptations, and a bibliography with hyperlinks of secondary works on Shakespeare in Turkey. I am also a researcher at the AHRC-funded project “Medieval and Early Modern Orients” that aims to contribute to our understanding of the medieval and early modern encounters between England and the Islamic Worlds.   I have written book chapters and articles in well-established publishers and journals (such as in Cambridge University Press, Parergon, English Studies and RiDE), and I have been a reviewer in international journals (such as RiDE and Sage Open). Currently, I am working on performance practices representing the East in early modern commercial and academic drama. I am the Turkish international correspondent of World Shakespeare Bibliography and a regional editor of the Global Shakespeares Project at MIT.

MemberJonathan Sarna

Jonathan D. Sarna is spending this year as a fellow of the Israel Institute for Advanced Studies.  Ordinarily he serves as University Professor and the Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University, where he chairs its Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program. He also is the past president of the Association for Jewish Studies and Chief Historian of the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia.  Author or editor of more than thirty books on American Jewish history and life, his American Judaism: A History won six awards including the 2004 “Everett Jewish Book of the Year Award” from the Jewish Book Council. Sarna is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Academy of Jewish Research. His most recent books are When General Grant Expelled the Jews and Lincoln & the Jews: A History (with Benjamin Shapell), which has just appeared in a Hebrew edition. 

MemberGiorgio Buccellati

Giorgio Buccellati studied at the Catholic University (Milan, Italy), Fordam University and received his Ph.D. from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. He is Research Professor in the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures and in the Department of History at UCLA. He founded the Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, of which he served as first director from 1973 until 1983 and where he is now Director of the Mesopotamian Lab. He is currently the Co-Director of the Urkesh/Mozan Archaeological Project as well as Director of IIMAS – The International Institute for Mesopotamian Area Studies and Director of AVASA – Associazione per la Valorizzazione dell’Archeologia e della Storia Antica. His research interests include the ancient languages, the literature, the religion, the archaeology and the history of Mesopotamia, as well as the theory of archaeology. His publications include site reports, text editions, linguistic and literary studies as well as on archaeological theory, historical monographs and essays on philosophy and spirituality. He has published a structural grammar of ancient Babylonian, two volumes on Mesopotamian civilization (on religion and politics; two more are forthcoming on literature as well as on art and architecture), a volume on archaeological theory dealing with the structural, digital and philosophical aspects of the archaeological record. He has authored two major scholarly websites on the archaeology of Urkesh and on archaeological theory. As a Guggenheim Fellow, he has traveled to Syria to study modern ethnography and geography for a better understanding of the history of the ancient Amorites. In his field work, he has developed new approaches to the preservation and presentation of archaeological sites and to community archaeology. He has spearheaded the Urkesh Extended Project, responding to the crisis of the war in Syria by maintaining a very active presence at the site. Giorgio Buccellati has worked for many years in the Near East, especially in Syria, Iraq and Turkey. Together with his wife, Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati, he is co-director of the archaeological expedition to Tell Mozan/Urkesh in North-Eastern Syria. They work closely together both in the field and on the publication reports from their excavations, of which five volumes, plus audio-visual presentations, have appeared so far. They lead an international staff comprising colleagues and students from the US, Europe, the Near East and Asia and have given joint lectures on the excavations, and workshops on methods used, at major archaeological centers around the world as well as holding positions as visiting professors in various European universities.