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MemberBernd Brabec de Mori

Bernd Brabec de Mori received his Ph.D in musicology from the University of Vienna. He specialised in indigenous music from the Ucayali valley in Eastern Peru, where he spent five years among the indigenous group Shipibo-Konibo. Since 2006, he has been working at the Phonogrammarchiv of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna; as a research and teaching assistant at the Centre for Systematic Musicology in Graz; as senior scientist at the Institute of Ethnomusicology, University of Music and Performing Arts, Graz; as guest professor at the Institute of Musicology of the University of Vienna, and as a lecturer at the department of social and cultural anthropology, Philipps-Universität Marburg. He is the author of “Die Lieder der Richtigen Menschen” (Songs of the Real People, 2015), editor of “The Human and Non-human in Lowland South American Indigenous Music” (2013), and co-editor of “Mundos audibles de América” (2015, with Matthias Lewy and Miguel A. García) and “Auditive Wissenskulturen” (2018, with Martin Winter). His publications contribute to the research areas of Western Amazonian indigenous music, arts, and history; to the complex of music, ritual, and altered states; as well as to theories about knowledge, ontology, and aurality/orality.

MemberSteven Foster

My research intends to trace the different ways the participants of the English Reformation tried to interpret the meaning of Romans 13:1-7 and how these interpretations made sense of the present during a period of seismic change.  The Pauline proof text ‘Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God’ (Rom.13:1), has been a neglected crux in the evolution of political theology and was central in the early modern debates which concerned politico-religious allegiance.

MemberWill Fenton

Will Fenton is the Director of Scholarly Innovation at the Library Company of Philadelphia and the Creative Director of Redrawing History: Indigenous Perspectives on Colonial America (The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage). He earned his Ph.D. from Fordham University in August 2018 (Department of English). Fenton specializes in early American literature and the digital humanities, for which he has received support from the American Philosophical Society; Haverford College Quaker and Special Collections; the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory; the Library Company of Philadelphia; the Modern Language Association; the New York Public Library; NYC Digital Humanities; and the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. His writings have appeared in academic journals (American QuarterlyCommon-Place, and ESQ); academic blogs (American Philosophical Society, HASTAC, MLA Connected Academics, Omohundro Uncommon Sense, and the Organization of American Historians); and various public platforms (including Inside Higher Ed and PC Magazine, for which he writes the column “Autodidact“). Fenton has also created several major digital projects outlined on digital scholarship.

MemberCornelia Rémi

I am currently serving as the Acting Chair of German Literature at Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, while on leave from my position as Akademische Oberrätin (untenured) at LMU Munich. Between 2016 and 2018 I served as Acting Chair of German Philology at the German Department of Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, focussing on the teacher training program (Literaturdidaktik) and collaborating intensely with colleagues from Linguistics to design an introductory lecture for students preparing to become German teachers. My research interests span the cosmos of European literatures from the early modern era to the 19th century (and occasional adventures into the realm of contemporary authors). I am a currently a member of the research network »Lutheran Orthodoxy Revisited« (https://luthorth.hypotheses.org/), working on a subbproject on the poetic popularization of erudite Lutheran discourses. In 2015 I finished my habilitation thesis (i.e. my second major monograph) »Erzählgeheimnisse: Funktionen unzugänglichen und vorenthaltenen Wissens in der Erzählliteratur des mittleren 19. Jahrhunderts« (»Narrated Secrets – Narrative Secrets: Functions of withheld and inaccessible knowledge in mid-19th-Century Prose Fiction«), which I am currently preparing for its print publication. Another project I have been juggling in my mind for quite some time and recently returned to is a major paper on the connections between the fictional, factual and autobiographical writings of Per Olov Enquist, which follows the genealogy of his autobiography through his entire oeuvre and along a long tradition of critical self-examination that dates back to the Moravian Church, Bunyan’s »A Pilgrim’s Progress« and beyond. Apart from such interactions between literature and spirituality, books for children and young adults have been an interest of mine for many years. In 2016 and 2017 I served in the jury for Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis, the most renowned German awards in the area of children’s and young adult literature, organised by the German branch of IBBY. I have co-organised conferences on hybrid literary genres and »geographic non-fiction« in 2014 and remain fascinated by the recently booming genre of geographic wimmelbooks (Städte-Wimmelbücher, Bymyldrebøker, …) and its implications for the presentation of encylopedic knowledge. Between 2009 and 2017 I was a member of the board of LMU’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and have been affiliated both with the Collaborative Research Center 573 (»Pluralisation and Authority in the Early Modern Period«) and the international research project Eurolab (Dynamik der Volkssprachigkeit im Europa der Renaissance/Dynamique des langues vernaculaires dans l’Europe de la renaissance). Besides, I regularly serve on the selection committee for the German National Merit Foundation and the Elite Network of Bavaria (Max Weber Programme). My teaching covers the area of German literature from the Reformation era to the 21th century. I have been the first academic teacher ever to earn the Bavarian Certificate of Academic Teaching (»Zertifikat Hochschullehre Bayern«) at my home university.