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TopicCFP: "Modernism and Diagnosis"

Call for Papers: “Modernism and Diagnosis” (prospective cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform) Edited by Lisa Mendelman and Heather A. Love Proposed titles & abstracts due March 15, 2019 Selected essays due June 15, 2019 We seek proposals for short, provocative essays addressing the topic of “Modernism and Diagnosis” for a prospective peer-reviewed cluster on […]

MemberMicheal Palmer

I am the owner of Greek-Language.com, GreekLinguistics.com, and HellenisticGreek.com. You can find my blog at GreekLanguage.blog. After a career teaching Ancient Greek (both Classical and Hellenistic) and Biblical Studies, I made a radical switch in 2006 taking me much more into the field of modern language acquisition. I now teach both Spanish and English in a dual language elementary school, and I will co-direct an academic-vocabulary development program to support bi-literacy this year (2018-19).

MemberYolanda Padilla

I am an interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersections of Latinx, American, and Latin American studies, with an emphasis on transnational approaches to these fields. My scholarship is animated by two commitments. First, I aim to recover and foreground the voices and forms of knowledge produced by colonized and dispossessed peoples. Second, I am dedicated to examining the transnational and historically informed presence and contributions of Latinx people to the making of the U.S. nation. To these ends, my work foregrounds the continuous life of Mexican Americans within and around the United States, especially through an analysis of their literary and cultural expressions, a focus on Spanish-language print culture materials, and by seeking out archives that illuminate Mexican American struggles over inequalities. I also examine Mexico’s continuing role as a protagonist in the making of Mexican American political subjectivities. By this I mean that I consider Mexican Americans’ continuing commitment to Mexican politics and culture even as their lives were embedded in the U.S. imperial order as a consequence of the U.S.-Mexican war. Such work not only provides a historical grounding for contemporary Chicanx identities, it adds an attention to the long history of their roles as dynamic agents in multiple nations, and to the influence of other national projects in the U.S. national space.   I am currently working on a book manuscript that grapples with such issues by studying Mexican American engagements with the Mexican Revolution. Titled “Revolutionary Subjects: The Mexican Revolution in Mexican American Cultural Politics, 1910-1959,” the book argues that Mexicans in the United States responded to the political and social exigencies arising from the Revolution in ways that were influenced by their conditions as members of an embattled and emerging ethnic group. These engagements resulted in a geopolitically-grounded border knowledge that imagined Mexican American relationships to and critiques of the United States in ways that were mediated by their engagements with Mexican politics and culture. This project allows for a continued examination of how Mexican Americans have been excluded from the United States, but adds a focus on how they have operated as dynamic parts of multiple nations and of transnational phenomena. I have published essays related to this work in Women’s Studies QuarterlyCR: The New Centennial Review, and in the volume Open Borders to a Revolution: Culture, Politics, and Migration (eds. Jaime Marroquín Arredondo, Adela Pineda Franco, and Magdalena Mieri).   Moreover, my research emphasizes the collective effort of recovering and examining little-known source materials that are vital to continued innovation of thought. Most of the literary works I examine in my book manuscript were originally written in the early twentieth century and have been recovered recently. I have engaged most directly in the process of recovery through my work on Spanish-language newspapers in the U.S. Southwest—an archive I draw from extensively in my scholarship. My work on early twentieth-century newspaper and literary writings by Mexicans in the United States led to my appointment as a contributing editor for the Heath Anthology of American Literature in 2011. I am also on the national advisory board for the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Project directed by Nicolás Kanellos and based at the University of Houston.

TopicNew: Bloomsbury Handbook of the Cultural and Cognitive Aesthetics of Religion

The new Bloomsbury Handbook of the Cultural and Cognitive Aesthetics of Religion HCCAR is published! Bridging the gap between culture and cognition, this handbook explores both scientific and humanities approaches to understanding the biophysical processes and meanings of religious life. It theorizes aesthetics as a fundamental paradigm for understanding religion as sensorial and embodied and […]

MemberStacey Balkan

Stacey Balkan is assistant professor of Environmental Literature and Humanities at Florida Atlantic University.  Her research focuses on postcolonial ecologies and the politics of representation in the Global South; landscape aesthetics and counter-pastoralism; Anthropocene studies; radical materialism; and environmental justice.  Stacey’s recent articles for The Global South and ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment examine the legacy of uneven and combined development in Nigeria and India; and she is now at work on two book-length manuscripts–Rogues in the Postcolony: Developing Itinerancy in India and Oil Fictions: World Literature and our Contemporary Petrosphere. Critiquing development policies in colonial and postcolonial India, Rogues in the Postcolony  foregrounds the intersection(s) between landscape ideology, agricultural improvement, and historical trauma as each obtains in British-occupied Bengal, post- independence Mumbai and New Delhi, and late-capitalist Bhopal. From the transformation of commonly held land for agriculture, whether in the form of plantation regimes or contemporary agribusiness, to the emergent slum ecologies of India’s premier urban enclaves, modern improvement schemes have hinged on the removal of figures who have lately found expression in novels that replace the neoliberal fictions of the “new India” with the itinerant narratives of the postcolonial pícaro. These stories constitute what Balkan calls an “aesthetics of indigence,” which brings into sharp focus what picaresque enthusiasts have long characterized as la vida buscóna–translated loosely as the “low life” of the working-class protagonist. Stacey is also co-editing a forthcoming collection entitled Oil Fictions: World literature and our Contemporary Petrosphere–an anthology situated within the emergent field of Petrocultures. Oil Fictions presents an attempt to grapple with the pervasiveness of this often-invisible biocultural agent through the cultivation of a robust petro-aesthetic practice. Her recent work also includes essays on the Anthropocene and its relationship to Empire for Global South Studies and Public Books; and her earlier research, born of several years teaching Contemporary Latin American Literature and Anglophone World Literature at Bergen Community College in New Jersey, has been published in The Cambridge Companion to Comparative Literature, World Literature and Comparative Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature and Culture.  At BCC, she also served as the co-director of the college’s Literary Arts Series and as a fellow for the Center for Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation.