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MemberAdrienne Williams Boyarin

Adrienne Williams Boyarin (PhD UC Berkeley, 2006) is Associate Professor of English and English Graduate Program Advisor at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. She is author of Miracles of the Virgin in Medieval England: Law and Jewishness in Marian Legends (D.S. Brewer 2010), praised as “elegantly written, scrupulously researched,” and a model of “codicological expertise” (Speculum 88.1, 2013). She is editor and translator of the alliterative Siege of Jerusalem (Broadview 2013, rev. in TLS) and Miracles of the Virgin in Middle English (Broadview 2015, rev. in TMR), and the founding Executive Editor of the journal Early Middle English (Arc Humanities/Amsterdam UP). Her research interests include Jewish-Christian polemics, medieval Anglo-Jewish history, Early Middle English (and the multilingual Early Middle English period broadly), manuscript studies, Marian texts, and gender studies. She is a former member of the MLA Executive Committee for TC Religion and Literature (2014-2019) and the MLA Delegate Assembly (2017-2019).  

MemberMatthew McMullen

Currently, I am a post-doc research fellow at the Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture in Nagoya, Japan, where I assist with editing for the Japanese Journal of Religious Studies. I also serve as a network editor for H-Buddhism and an associate editor for the Digital Dictionary of Buddhism. I completed a PhD in Buddhist Studies at UC Berkeley in 2016 and have spent time at Columbia University, Waseda University, University of Virginia, Taisho University, and the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. My research primarily focuses on Japanese esoteric Buddhism, but my interests extend to Buddhist thought and practice in general.

MemberEmma Herbert-Davies

I am currently completing an MA in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds. My undergraduate dissertation explored how horses were used in manuscript art to reflect the status and gender of their riders. My master’s dissertation carries on the equine theme through a study of violence and injury to horses in medieval tournaments. I will begin my PhD in September and my thesis will be based on researching the equestrian equipment used in tournaments and warfare, with a focus on horse armour. My supervisors will be Dr Alan Murray (University of Leeds) and Dr Karen Watts (Royal Armouries, Leeds). I have ridden, trained and competed horses for most of my life and also have a keen interest in numismatics, having spent much of my undergraduate time cataloging and digitising the University of Leeds coin collections (@winchestercoins).  

MemberNathan A. Kennedy

At heart, I’m a phenomenologist. This is the lens with which I investigate my primary interests of religion, sexuality, and culture, reflecting my passion for interdisciplinarity amongst the humanities and social sciences. Through this, I come into contact with practical theology, critical theory, queer theory, and psychoanalytic theory, along with other fields of discourse. With a theo-ethical foundation in deconstructive and existential hermeneutics, I work to discover phenomenological methods, theological insights, and practical approaches relating to the lived experiences LGBTQ persons and communities, intersecting theory with practice in clinical and community advocacy contexts, with ultimate outcomes in the forms of strategies in advocacy, policy, and pedagogy.