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MemberVivian Nun Halloran

My research and teaching interests are profoundly interdisciplinary. In the courses I teach as well as in my writing, I investigate how literary genres such as autobiography, short fiction, and the novel intersect with, and mutually inform, scientific discourse, nutritionism, popular culture, or museums as sites of cultural performance. I am a Caribbeanist by training, and a literary food studies scholar by vocation. My first book, Exhibiting Slavery, considers how postmodern Caribbean historical novels about slavery function as museums by curating artwork and other objects within their pages. I contend that the novels thematize the second-hand way through which we come to learn about history as a textual encounter with the past. I also argue that postmodernism’s penchant for excess becomes the means through which we acknowledge our own inability to imagine the commonplace physical and ideological violence of treating people like chattel. My second book, The Immigrant Kitchen, analyzes the life writing subgenre of the food memoir with recipes, to think through how the trauma of immigration is inherited down the generations. My overall contention is that the interactive relationship facilitated by the recipes is a manifestation of virtual hospitality, wherein the reader accepts the writer’s welcome to his/her domestic space by preparing the food s/he reads about in the memoir.

MemberJohn E. Drabinski

John E. Drabinski is Charles Hamilton Houston 1915 Professor of Black Studies in the Department of Black Studies at Amherst College. In addition to authoring four books, most recently Glissant and the Middle Passage: Philosophy, Beginning, Abyss (Minnesota, 2019) and Levinas and the Postcolonial: Race, Nation, Other (Edinburgh, 2012), he has written over three dozen articles on Africana theory and French philosophy, and has edited books and journal issues on Frantz Fanon, Jean-Luc Godard, Emmanuel Levinas, Édouard Glissant, and the question of political reconciliation. He is currently finalizing a translation and critical introduction to Jean Bernabé, Patrick Chamoiseau, and Raphael Confiant’s Éloge de la créolité, and is completing a book-length study of the philosophical dimensions of James Baldwin’s non-fiction entitled ‘So Unimaginable a Price’: Baldwin and the Black Atlantic.

MemberRuth-Ellen St. Onge

I was born and raised in rural Northern Ontario and lived in Toronto for several years before relocating to the United States in 2015 to join the curatorial staff at Rare Book School. During my graduate studies, I worked at the rare book library and research centre, Joseph Sablé Centre for 19th Century French Studies, and taught undergraduate FSL and French Cultural Studies courses in the Department of French at the University of Toronto. My interdisciplinary doctoral dissertation focused on publishers of poetry in 19th century France, with particular attention paid to the careers of Auguste Poulet-Malassis, Alphonse Lemerre, and Léon Vanier. My current research has shifted towards the study of contemporary graphic novels and comic book culture.

MemberNeil Gregor

I am Professor of Modern European History at the University of Southampton, G.B., where I have worked since 1994.   My research has ranged widely over the business, social, and cultural history of the twentieth century; at its core is the project of thinking through the place of the Third Reich in the longer history of Germany and Europe’s twentieth century and, in particular, of embedding histories of the Holocaust in wider narratives of modern German and European history.  My most recent project focusses on the cultural history of art music in C20th Germany, in connection with which I am writing a book on the institution of the symphony concert in Nazi Germany.