Search

MemberJamil Mustafa

I am Professor of English Studies and former Department Chair at Lewis University, where I teach courses in Victorian literature, Film Studies, and Gothic literature. My current and upcoming publications include book chapters on the poetry of Oscar Wilde, the Gothic fiction of Walter Scott, and adaptations of Jekyll and Hyde, together with journal articles on neo-Victorian representations of masculinity and the fiction of Ray Bradbury.

MemberS. Jonathon O'Donnell

I am an IRC Research Fellow on the project Neo-Charismatic Evangelicalism in the Time of Trump: Demonology, Authoritarianism and Post-Truth Politics. My research draws on religious studies, political science, and critical theory to interrogate contemporary demonologies in a cultural climate in which demonization is increasingly central to the global religious and political landscape. Situated at the cutting edge of transnational American Studies, I interrogate the embeddedness of American religion within broader political, sociocultural, and technological discourses, exploring critical contemporary issues such as Islamophobia, homophobia, and religious nationalism. 

Membershallcrossmr

I’m an independent researcher, based in York, UK. My work explores the tensions between popular and ‘high’ culture that shaped the literary landscape of twentieth-century Britain, with a particular focus on the disruptive role of parody and satire in this contest of values. My first book, Rethinking G.K. Chesterton and Literary Modernism: Parody, Performance, and Popular Culture, was published by Routledge in 2017. I am currently working on my second monograph, also under contract with Routledge: The Parodic Devil in British Post-Enlightenment Culture: Inscribing Pandemonium.

MemberMaria Galmarini-Kabala

I am a historian of the Soviet Union with a particular interest in the history of political ideas and their impact on marginalized members of society. My work has so far explored ideas of social rights and welfare, relief to political prisoners, bio-political approaches to behaviorally problematic children, the rehabilitation of blinded WWII veterans, and ideas of justice among deaf people during the Russian Revolution. Most recently, I have published a book entitled The Right to Be Helped: Deviance, Entitlement, and the Soviet Moral Order (Northern Illinois University Press, 2016). Through an analysis of the treatment reserved to men, women, and children who deviated from the physical and gender norms of Soviet subjectivity, this book explores the moral order of socialism and interrogates its legitimacy in the post-revolutionary and Stalinist periods.  

MemberAndrew Colin Gow

In my first book, I traced and analyzed the German legend of the Red Jews, an imaginary conflation of the Ten Tribes of Israel with Gog and Magog, the apocalyptic destroyers featured in the books of Ezekiel and Revelation. My publications since 2000 on the ‘Protestant paradigm’ regarding vernacular Bible translations and editions in the later Middle Ages contributed to a new field of research and debate, with a research cluster at the University of Groningen and a number of conferences and conference panels devoted to the topic. This project addressed late medieval vernacular Bibles, their readership, their dissemination and their cultural effects — which includes contributing to the conditions under which the Protestant Reformation ‘caught fire’ so quickly: e.g., Luther’s Bible translation was a hit because burghers had been reading vernacular Bibles and biblical texts for so long, not because they had been denied access to the Bible. The wide distribution and availability of German and other vernacular Bible translations in the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, with 22 printed full Bible translations into German/Low German/Netherlandish appearing before Luther’s famous Bible translation, has been known to scholars since at least the early eighteenth century, when various works on German Bibles before the Reformation began to appear. However, the existence of such translations did not guarantee that scholars, especially church historians and historians of the Reformation took such Bible translations seriously. My findings also demonstrate how central modes of history-writing participate in myth-making — sometimes even under the guise of source analysis. In 2003, my former student Dr. Lara Apps and I co-published Male Witches in Early Modern Europe (Manchester UP), which was based in part on her M.A. thesis. Since 2005, my former student Dr. Robert Desjardins (Ph.D. 2008) and I, along with François Pageau and a number of other graduate students, have been working on the witch trials at Arras in 1459-60 — possibly the very first mass witch-trials that took the classic form under which we know them, a snowball phenomenon driven by torture and sponsored by the authorities — after coming across a hitherto unknown manuscript of a treatise written to justify the trials in their gruesome aftermath. This princely manuscript had been lurking in the UofA library system’s Bruce Peel Special Collections since it was donated to the university by Dr. John Lunn in 1989, but its existence was unknown to scholarship — a 1999 edition of the text relied on manuscripts held at Paris, Brussels and Oxford, but the UofA manuscript is probably the oldest and the best of them. This text anticipates the much better known Witches’ Hammer (Malleus Maleficarum) by a quarter century, and already contains all the elements that the later text would so famously disseminate. Our critical edition of the UofA ms., collated against the other known manuscripts and the 1475 incunabulum printed by Colard Mansion, is in preparation. Our translation of the text, the first into English, and of another treatise written at the same time and in the same place, in collaboration with my Ph.D. student François Pageau and my former student Dr. Robert Desjardins, appeared with Penn State University Press in 2016: http://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-07128-2.html. The Bruce Peel Special Collections Library and Archives produced and hosts a digital exhibition on this manuscript: https://omeka.library.ualberta.ca/exhibits/show/tinctor/imagining. We have finished and hope to publish in 2019 with the collaboration of Dr. Jessica Roussanov our complete translation of the voluminous Middle French records of the appeal of the Arras convictions to the Parlement (royal court) of Paris spanning the years 1461 to 1467, with brief postludes up to the final resolution of the appeals in 1491, together with translations of the many late-medieval chronicle entries and other sources relating to these trials from the dawn of the European witch-craze. Demonology and witch-hunting: for more about my recent research, please see this one-minute presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_dezXYIMew  

MemberEnzo Rossi

I’m a political theorist in the Department of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam, and the co-editor of the European Journal of Political Theory. My main current project is a realist critical theory of legitimacy. This stems from the intersection of a number of interests: (i) methodological issues in political theory, e.g. realism vs moralism and, relatedly but separately, ideal vs non-ideal theory; (ii) the historical development liberal ideology; (iii) the normative status of political authority; (iv) the accommodation of diversity. More generally, I’m concerned with the relationship between the descriptive and the normative study of society.

MemberCandace Barrington

I teach medieval English literature at Central Connecticut State University.  My research interests are two-fold. First, I examine the intersection of legal and literary discourse, which has lead to several articles and co-edited volumes. Currently, I am co-editing the Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Law and Literature with Sebastian Sobecki (University of Groningen). My second research interest examines Chaucer’s popular reception.  In this vein, I have written American Chaucers (2007) and contributed articles to Sex and Sexuality in a Feminist World (2009), American Literary History (2009), European Journal of English Studies (2011), Dark Chaucer: An Assortment (2012), Medieval Afterlives in Popular Culture (2012), Digital Gaming Re-imagines the Middle Ages (2013), Educational Theory (2014), Screening Chaucer: Absence, Presence, and Adapting the Canterbury Tales (2016), and Cambridge Companion to Medievalism (2016). In a broader context, I collaborate with Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University) on Global Chaucers (http://www.globalchaucers.wordpress.com), a project focusing on non-Anglophone adaptations and translations.  With Hsy, I maintain an active blog and have written articles for Medieval Afterlives in Contemporary Culture (2015), Accessus (2015), and postmedieval (2015). Together we are co-editing an issue for the Global Circulation Project at Literature Compass. Because of my interest in teaching and Chaucer’s global reception, I am a founding member of the Editorial Collective for the Open Access Companion to The Canterbury Tales, a project developing a free, high-quality, open-access introductory volume reaching Chaucer’s global audience of English readers from a wide diversity of institutions.  

MemberHeather Jensen

Heather Belnap Jensen is associate professor of art history at Brigham Young University. Her research focuses on women in the art world of post-Revolutionary France and transatlantic culture and Mormonism, c. 1900, and she is currently working on book projects in these areas. Jensen is the co-editor, along with Temma Balducci and Pamela Warner, of Interior Portraiture and Masculine Identity in France, 1789-1914 (Ashgate, 2011) and its pendant volume, Women, Femininity, and Public Space in European Visual Culture, 1789-1914 (Ashgate, 2014). Undergraduate courses that Professor Jensen frequently teaches include methods of art history, nineteenth-century European art, modern art, contemporary art, and women in art and visual culture. Jensen is a member of the executive committee for the BYU Women’s Studies program, where she oversees WSTAR, its faculty research group; she is also on the BYU European Studies executive committee and chairs the BYU London Centre faculty oversight committee. Jensen currently serves on the College Art Association’s Committee for Women in the Arts and is a regional representative for The Feminist Art Project.

MemberPeter Webster

I am an historian of twentieth century British Christianity, with interests in four interlocking areas: (i) the position of the Church of England in national life, and the question of faith, politics and the law more generally. My 2015 book on Michael Ramsey, archbishop of Canterbury, dealt with this theme, amongst others. (ii) the history of evangelical Christianity, particularly in the UK; (iii) the relationship between the Christian churches and the arts. My most recent book is on Walter Hussey, Anglican patron of the arts; (iv) the digital turn in contemporary history, with a very particular interest in the archived Web as a new kind of historical source. I am based in the south of England, where my day job is being managing director of Webster Research and Consulting, which works with libraries, archives and universities to help understand what users need from digital resources, and working with technologists to meet those needs.