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MemberPratik Chakrabarti

…national Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 1464-3685 (December 2011).
‘Of Empire and other Parasites; Tropical Medicine in British India’, Biblio: A Review of Books, XII, 9 & 10, September–October, 2007, pp. 20-21. ISSN 0971-8982
‘Introduction’ to the Special issue on ‘States of Healing: New Perspectives on the State in Histories of Medicine’ of the journal South Asian History and Culture, 2012, vol. 4, no. 1, pp 1-8.

Chapters in Books

‘Science and Imperialism since 1870’, (with Michael Worboys) in Modern Science in National, Transnational, and Global Context, Vol. 8 of The Cambridge History of Science¸ (eds) Hugh Richard Slotten, Ronald L. Numbers, and David N. Livingstone (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 201…

My research specializations are in the history of medicine, science and global and imperial history, spanning South Asian, Caribbean and Atlantic history from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. I am currently completing my next research monograph, titled Inscriptions of Nature: Geology and the Science of Antiquity. The manuscript is based on the major Leverhulme trust funded project; ‘An Antique Land; Geology, Philology and the Making of the Indian Subcontinent, 1830-1920’, of which I was the Principal Investigator. The project investigates the history of the discovery of the geological past of Indian subcontinent in its philological, anthropological and cultural dimensions and its links with the discovery of Indian antiquity. In doing so, the project highlights the unique convergence of mythology and science in India. I have published four sole-authored monographs. My first book, Western Science in Modern India: Metropolitan Methods, Colonial Practices (2004) was based on my PhD dissertation. Beginning in the eighteenth century, this book reveals a process of knowledge-transfer that involved European surgeons, missionaries and surveyors and Indian nationalist scientists. In the process, it demonstrates how modern science became the idiom of Indian nationhood and modernity. My second monograph, Materials and Medicine: Trade, Conquest and Therapeutics in the Eighteenth Century was published in 2010. Through a study of the expansion of British colonialism in the West Indies and South Asia, it explores how medicine was transformed in the eighteenth century in the context of war and commerce and acquired new medical materials as well as a distinct materialism. My third monograph, Bacteriology in British India: Laboratory Medicine and the Tropics, (2012) is based on the research for a major project; the  Wellcome Trust University Award  on ‘Laboratory Medical Research in Colonial India 1890-1950’ at the University of Kent, 2006-2011. The book provides a social and cultural history of bacteriology and vaccination in colonial India, situating it at the confluence of colonial medical practices, institutionalization and social and cultural movements. While teaching history of medicine and imperialism, I realised that although there has been prolific new research on colonial medicine in recent years there was a need for a synoptic and thorough analysis of the field. Consequently, I wrote Medicine and Empire, 1600-1960, which was published in 2014 by Palgrave MacMillan. The book provides a global history of imperial medicine focusing on British, French and Spanish empires in Africa, Asia and America from the seventeenth to the twentieth century.

MemberKumkum Sangari

Kumkum Sangari is the William F. Vilas Research Professor of English and the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 

She has been a Professorial Fellow at the Centre for Contemporary Studies, Nehru Memorial Museum and Library, New Delhi; a Visiting Fellow at Yale University, Delhi University and Jadavpur University; and a Visiting Professor at University of Chicago,  Central European University, University of London (SOAS), University of Erfurt and Ambedkar University. 

Dr. Sangari has published extensively on British, American and Indian literature, the gendering of  South Asian medieval devotional traditions, nationalist figures such as M.K.Gandhi, Bombay cinema, televisual memory,  feminist art practice, and several contemporary gender issues such as personal law, widow immolation, domestic labour,  the beauty industry, son selection, commercial surrogacy,  and communal violence. 

She is the author of Solid Liquid: A transnational reproductive formation (2015) and Politics of the Possible: Essays on Gender, History, Narratives, Colonial English (1999). 

She has co-edited several books including Recasting Women and, most recently, has edited Arc Silt Dive: The Works of Sheba Chhachhi (2016)  and Trace Retrace: Paintings, Nilima Sheikh (2013).