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MemberBehnam M. Fomeshi

Specializing in comparative literature, Behnam M. Fomeshi is interested in Iranian studies, American studies and in particular the intersection of the two. He is also highly experienced in literary theory, with experience in teaching and considerable expertise in Persian language, literature and culture. He lectured at various national and international conferences, symposia, colloquia, and workshops. He has taught courses on various genres as well as study skills. Behnam is a fellow of Alexander von Humboldt Foundation to conduct research on Whitman and Persian poetry. In addition to a Humboldt fellowship, he has received several grants including two for research at the University of St Andrews and Leiden University. His works have been widely published and his monograph, The Persian Whitman: Beyond a Literary Reception was released with Leiden University Press in 2019. https://www.lup.nl/product/the-persian-whitman/ Behnam would like to keep in touch with scholars of Persian and American literature from around the world. Any piece of information regarding the presence of American literature in Iran (e.g. an early translation of American literature into Persian) is highly appreciated.   کوچکترین نکته ای دربارۀ «پذیرش ادبیات امریکا در ایران»، برای نمونه ترجمه های نخستین از آثار نویسندگان آمریکایی به فارسی، به پژوهش من کمک شایانی خواهد کرد. پیشاپیش از عزیزانی که در این باره مرا راهنمایی بفرمایند سپاسگزارم. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Behnam_Mirzababazadeh_Fomeshi2

MemberIan D. Morris

I’m a historian of early Muslim societies. In 2013–16 I was a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), working as part of an international collaborative project called Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom (PIMIC). Over the course of this project I spent time as a visiting researcher at Panthéon-Sorbonne, Paris; the School of Oriental and African Studies, London; Tel Aviv University; and the Netherlands Institute in Turkey, Istanbul. In 2017–19 I’ve been teaching undergraduate tutorials in Medieval and Middle Eastern History at St Andrews.

MemberAnne Fuchs

Anne Fuchs studied German and English Literature at the University of Konstanz, Trinity College Dublin and the Freie Universität Berlin. Her PhD examined the role of humour in the works of the Swiss writer Robert Walser. Between ‌1992-2010 she was Lecturer, Senior Lecturer and then Professor of Modern German Literature and Culture at University College Dublin where she co-founded the UCD Humanities Institute in 2002, funded by the Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions in Ireland (PRTLI 3). From 2002 – 2007 she was Principal Investigator of the five-year Research Programme “German Memory Contests since 1945”, funded by PRTLI3. In 2005/6 she received an IRCHSS Senior Research Fellowship, which enabled her to carry out research for her fourth monograph Phantoms of War in Contemporary German Literature, Films and Discourse. The award of a UCD Senior Fellowship in 2010 helped her to complete her research on After the Dresden Bombing: Pathways of Memory, 1945 to the Present. In 2011 she accepted the Chair and Professorship of German at the University of St Andrews before moving to Warwick in January 2012. She was a Fellow of the Max Planck research group Memory and History, University of Constance and guest researcher at the Kulturwissenschaftliche Kolleg, Universität Konstanz in 2014. She returned to UCD in September 2016 to assume the Directorship of the UCD Humanities Institute. She is a Member of the Royal Irish Academy and in 2014 she was elected a Fellow of the British Academy.Research interests
Memory studies (in particular German politics of memory since 1945); German literature in the 20th and 21st centuries; German-Jewish literature; Modernism; the cultural history of walking; time and temporality in the digital era.Her current research concerns the experience of historical acceleration at the beginning of the 21 century. The inability to determine the speed of social and economic developments through conventional legislation and planning in western democracy was underlined by the events in the wake of the financial crash of 2008. Indeed, the premium placed on speed and the constant drive towards innovation raise the question of how cultural connectedness to places and traditions can be assured under such radically new conditions. She was co-organiser (with Jonathan Long, Durham University) of an international conference on Faster than Light? Historical Experience, Placed Identity and Memory in the Age of Historical Acceleration which was held at the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Warwick from 7 – 9 March 2012. And The Longing for Time: Ästhetische Eigenzeit in Contemporary German Literature, Film and Art, held at the Kulturiwssenschaftliche Kolleg, Universität Konstanz , 15-17 May 2014 in collaboration with Prof. Aleida Assmann.