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MemberSarah Magnatta

Sarah received her PhD in Art History from The Ohio State University, specializing in Tibetan and South Asian art.  Her upcoming article is titled “Common Ground: Place and Identity in Contemporary Tibetan Art,” in a special issue of the Journal of the British Association for South Asian Studies.  She is currently an affiliate faculty member at the University of Denver, where she has taught since 2010.  Her courses include Asian art history, Tibetan art, Sacred Spaces, Politics in Art, and Buddhism in Art. She also teaches a travel course each summer that brings students to the galleries of New York City.  Titled “Tibet on Display,” the students learn how institutional motivations vary between places like the Met, the Natural History Museum, the Tibet House, and the Rubin Museum of Art. Sarah spent three years as the Interpretive Specialist of Asian Art at the Denver Art Museum, where she worked on exhibitions such as Ganesha: The Playful Protector and Linking Asia, for which she wrote the catalog essay “The Transmission of Buddhist Imagery throughout Asia.”  Sarah is now working on various exhibitions throughout Denver, including curating an exhibition with contemporary Cambodian artist Leang Seckon at McNichols Civic Center and an exhibition with contemporary Tibetan artist Tenzing Rigdol at the Emmanuel Art Gallery on Auraria campus.

MemberAngel David Nieves

Angel David Nieves is Associate Professor and Director of the American Studies Program at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York. He is currently Co-Directing Hamilton’s Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) funded by the Mellon Foundation (2010-2016). He is also Research Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He taught in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at the University of Maryland, College Park, from 2003-2008. His scholarly work and community-based activism critically engages with issues of memory, heritage preservation, gender and nationalism at the intersections of race and the built environment in cities across the Global South. His co-edited book “We Shall Independent Be:” African American Place-Making and the Struggle to Claim Space in the U.S. was published in 2008. He has published essays in numerous journals including Journal of Planning History; Places Journal; and Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies; and in several edited collections, including Making Humanities Matter (2017). His digital research and scholarship have been featured on MSNBC.com and in Newsweek.    

MemberIlse Schweitzer VanDonkelaar

I am a medievalist specializing in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse literatures and languages and have taught on topics ranging from medieval and early modern lit to world mythologies, environmental lit, critical theory, and the literature of death and dying. My research focuses on representations of space and the environment in Anglo-Saxon poetry, as well as on death in medieval Icelandic texts. Currently, I am an Acquisitions Editor for Medieval Institute Publications at Kalamazoo, Arc-Humanities Press, and Amsterdam University Press, seeking projects for the following series: Places and Spaces, Medieval to Modern Richard Rawlinson Center Series in Anglo-Saxon Studies Environmental Humanities in Pre-Modern Cultures Medieval Media Cultures Teaching the Middle Ages New Queer Medievalisms

MemberJulia Voss

Research Interests:

My current and past work examines how literacy learning and performance take place across spaces and modes ranging across classroom and community settings. Informed by an emphasis on modality, my research focuses on the affordances and constraints of different social, technical, and institutional settings to examine possibilities and call for changes that support more equitable participation of all members.

Professional Interests:

My research on classroom design and writing in the disciplines has increasingly drawn my attention to the institutional and infrastructural work of writing program administration. As writing specialists, we need to continue our decades-long work with colleagues across the university to design effective writing curricula based on our own disciplinary knowledge. However, as (unacknowledged) experts in active learning pedagogies, writing specialists and WPAs also have considerable expertise to contribute to learning space design initiatives, involving stakeholders outside academic departments at the level of the university’s physical facilities.

Teaching Interests:

I teach classes in digital and print composing with an emphasis on (multi)modality, technical communication, writing studies, digital culture.

MemberPatricia Murrieta-Flores

I’m the Director of the Digital Humanities Research Centre based at the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Chester. I’m also ERC Senior Researcher at the ‘Past in its Place Project’ (2014-2016) and Lecturer in Digital Humanities (from 2017). I’m part of the team of the HERA ‘Deepdead Project’ (2016-2019), a collaborator in the ‘Spatial Humanities Project’ at Lancaster University, and the European Cost Action ‘Reassembling the Republic of Letters’. My interest lies in the application of technologies for Humanities and her primary area of research is the Spatial Humanities and the investigation of different aspects of space, place and time using a range of technologies including GIS and Corpus Linguistic approaches. See some of my publications here: Patricia Murrieta-Flores in Academia.

MemberAndrew Filmer

Senior Lecturer in Theatre and Performance at Aberystwyth University. Co-convenor of the International Federation of Theatre Research (IFTR) Theatre Architecture Working Group (2012 to the present). I moved to Aberystwyth in 2008 having previously taught at the University of Sydney, the University of New South Wales and the University of Western Sydney.

MemberHeidi Dodson

Heidi Dodson is a postdoctoral fellow in the Humanities in the World initiative at the Penn State Humanities Institute. She is a historian who specialized in twentieth-century African American history. Her research interests include community building, social movements, race and landscape, public and digital history, and environmental history. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has an MLIS from the University of Texas at Austin. Heidi is currently working on a book manuscript based on her dissertation, titled “We Cleared the Land with Our Hands”: Claiming Black Community Space in the Missouri Delta. Her work interrogates the intersections of rural migration, activism, and place in the Border South. Heidi most recently held positions as the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Scholarship at the University at Buffalo (2018-2019) and Oral History Scholar-in-Residence at the Marian Cheek Jackson Center in Chapel Hill, NC (2017-2018).

MemberDavid Adler

In my current research project, I will inquire the governing of office work in and through its architectural conditions in late capitalism. Within the framework of an ethnographically extended dispositive analysis, I am especially interested in two aspects. On the one hand, I will investigate spatial control programs, generated by managerial and architectural discourses. An analysis of enacted and embodied practices, which take place with and within such ‘formatted’ spaces, on the other hand, will shift the focus towards the inner restrictions of these programs and local moments of subversion and resistance. Before that I have been working on an interactionist reframing of hegemony anaysis. Starting with the anouncement of Bin Laden’s death by Barack Obama I have traced the emergence of hegemony and conter-hegemony in the international and intranational reactions to the killing of Bin Laden.

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.