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MemberBarbara Allen


Ph.D. in Russian and Soviet History, 2001, Indiana University Bloomington.
M.A. in Russian and Soviet History, 1992, Indiana University Bloomington.
B.A. in Modern European History, 1989, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  • U.S. citizen born in North Carolina, USA.
  • Author, editor, and translator of books, articles, and reviews about the history of the Russian revolutionary movement, Stalinist terror, trade unions, and the Workers’ Opposition within the Soviet Communist Party.
  • Teaches using Reacting to the Past pedagogy.
  • Travels include Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Finland, United Kingdom, France, The Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Mexico.

MemberNina Janz

I am a Research Associate in the Project in History of Justice. As an archivist, I am researching and inventorying relevant documents for the project. I provide our team with relevant documents and prepares them for the digitalizing and virtual exhibition. I worked as an archivist at the German Federal Archive, in Koblenz and Berlin and at the Military Archive in Freiburg, where I managed requests and inquiries concerning the Wehrmacht, WW II and the fate of POW and other Nazi victims. I supported projects in digitalizing and preservation of documents and worked in a project of the German Historical Moscow to digitalize records of Soviet POW. After my archival career, I began my doctorate at the University of Hamburg in cultural anthropology about the impact of death and violence and the memory of WW II in the post-war period in Germany and Russia. My research focus lies on the commemoration aspects of military dead/war dead and war cemeteries in Germany and Russia, the Holocaust in Eastern Europe and on cultural aspects on the Wehrmacht and military violence during WW II. And secondly, my research interests cover the classical historical research in archives and libraries, digital methods and innovations and the questions of digital preservation and accessibility of historical documents.

MemberJakub Drabik

One central element of my interest has been the history of fascism, particularly British and Czech fascism. My work, however, covers a broad range of topics, including European fascisms, British and Czechoslovak history as well as the history of Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th Century. I am currently writing a book on Fascism (definition, history, manifestations) that should be published in 2018 as the first publication of its kind in Slovak language. I am also currently working on the study on the continuities and discontinuities of political elites in Czechoslovakia after the Soviet invasion and crushing of the Prague spring in 1968. One of my side projects is also focused on Czech/Czechoslovak fascism, which has been much overlooked in Western historiography I have completed my doctorate at Charles university in Prague and spent the academic year 2012/2013 as a visiting research scholar at Oxford Brookes working on my dissertation with professor Roger Griffin. Apart from that I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to spend some time as a visiting research scholar at Wroclaw university in 2014 and enjoyed numerous research visits in London, Sheffield, Birmingham, Coventry, Bolton, Budapest etc. Since then I have published two books on BUF and Oswald Mosley (in Czech) and numerous scholarly articles on fascism, fascist propaganda and BUF. I am currently working at the Institute of History, Slovak Academy of sciences in Bratislava and as an external teacher at the Masaryk university in Brno. I also work as a deputy editor-in-chief at HistoryWeb.sk and regularly write for Slovak dailies. Supervisors: Prof. Roger Griffin, Prof. Martin Kovář a Dr. Jaromir Soukup

MemberClaire Le Foll

I am Associate Professor of East European Jewish History and Culture at the University of Southampton, G.B., where I have worked since 2009. I work on the history and culture of Jews in Eastern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, and more specifically on the history of Jews in Belarus. My current research project deals with the national experiments in Lithuania, Belorussia and Ukraine from 1905 to 1941, and in particular how national-cultural autonomy was implemented in these emerging republics. I am conducting research on the cultural interactions in literature, art, theatre, cinema and on the circulation of knowledge among various ethnic groups (Jews, Belorussians, Poles, Ukrainians, etc) and geographic areas (Poland, Russia and the previous margins of the Russian empire – Ukraine, Belarus). I recently published a book on La Biélorussie dans l’histoire et l’imaginaire des Juifs de l’Empire russe, 1772-1905 (Belarus in the history and imaginary of Russian Jews, 1772-1905) and am currently working on illustrations of Yiddish journals and books in Soviet Belorussia.

MemberAmber Nickell

Amber N. Nickell is a Ph.D. Candidate at Purdue University. Her primary research and teaching field is “Modern Central and Eastern European History”; however, she completed minor preliminary exam fields in “Transnational Germany” and “Russian Imperial Borderlands.”  She earned a Master’s degree in American history (2013) and a Bachelor’s degree in European history (2011) from the University of Northern Colorado. She has presented her work at numerous local, national, and international conferences, workshops, and symposia and received a number of awards for her writing, research, service, and teaching. Additionally, she is a recipient of several research grants and fellowships, including the 2016 Auschwitz Jewish Center Fellowship, Title VIII Grants, and most recently the Fulbright Fellowship (Ukraine). Amber’s training as a scholar of both Europe and the United States enables her to conduct research and teach across these fields. Her methodologies transcend the national, focusing on transnational phenomena, including migration, diaspora, deportation, ethnic cleansing, genocide, human rights, and internationalism. Her command of the spatial humanities augments these strengths. Amber’s most recent publication, “Time to Show the Kremlin America’s Full House: The Committee for Human Rights in the Soviet Union, Rabbi Gedalyah Engel, and their Refusnik Adoptees, 1977-1992,” which appeared in The Transnational Yearbook, Volume 1 (Fairleigh Dickenson, 2018), serves as one example. For more details, see: https://rowman.com/isbn/9781683930037/yearbook-of-transnational-history-(2018)-volume-1 Amber’s current project, tentatively titled “Brotherlands to Bloodlands: Ethnic Germans and Jews in Southern Ukraine, Late Tsarist to Postwar” examines coexistence and confluence between the two groups in territories which now fall in Southern Ukraine and Moldova. She considers the astounding territorial, political, and demographic shifts in the region and ponders their impact on intergroup relationships. In doing so, she illuminates historical processes that transformed interactions between ethnic Germans and their Jewish neighbors from neighborly to murderous.

MemberCovell Meyskens

I am a historian of twentieth century China with particular interests in industrialization, revolution, and experiences and memories of war. In 2015, I received my PhD in History from the University of Chicago and then became an assistant professor in the department of National Security Affairs at the US Naval Postgraduate School. My first book is titled Mao’s Third Front: The Militarization of Cold War China. It examines how the Chinese Communist Party industrialized inland regions in order to protect socialist China from American and Soviet threats. I am currently working on two book projects. The first one – The Three Gorges Dam: Building a Hydraulic Engine for China – analyzes state-led efforts to transform China’s Three Gorges region into a hydraulic engine to power national development.  I am also in the process of researching a third book project tentatively titled, The People’s Army: A Social and Cultural History of the Military in China, 1927- present. My research has been supported by the Fulbright International Institute of Education, the Fulbright-Hays Commission, and the University of Chicago.

MemberIvan Sablin

Ivan Sablin leads the Research Group “Entangled Parliamentarisms: Constitutional Practices in Russia, Ukraine, China and Mongolia, 1905–2005,” sponsored by the European Research Council (ERC), at the University of Heidelberg. His research interests include the history of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, with special attention to Siberia and the Russian Far East, and global intellectual history. He is the author of two monographs – Governing Post-Imperial Siberia and Mongolia, 1911–1924 (London: Routledge, 2016) and The Rise and Fall of Russia’s Far Eastern Republic, 1905–1922 (London: Routledge, 2018) – and research articles in Slavic Review, Europe-Asia StudiesNationalities Papers, and other journals.

MemberTatiana Klepikova

Tatiana Klepikova is a Faculty of Arts & Science Postdoctoral Fellow at the Women & Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto, where she is working on her postdoctoral project about contemporary Russian queer theater and drama. She defended her Ph.D. in Slavic Literary Studies at the University of Passau, Germany, in 2019, after obtaining degrees in Teaching Foreign Languages (English and Spanish) in Yaroslavl (Russia), and Russian and East-Central European Studies in Passau. She is co-editor of several collections of interdisciplinary essays on privacy, including Outside the “Comfort Zone”: Private and Public Spheres in Late Socialist Europe (forthcoming in 2020 by De Gruyter). Tatiana’s work strives to capture and elucidate sites, experiences, and articulations of “marginality” in Russian cultural imagination, especially in literature, media, and the arts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. A meeting point of hegemonic and alternative discourses, “marginality” as a social, political, and cultural construct fascinates her by the multiplicity of meanings and readings that may be (counter-)coded in it. It thereby has immense potential to reveal the structures of power, control, and difference that have to do not only with political oppression, but also with imaginativeness and agency, which are often overlooked in connection to (neo)authoritarian settings like Russia. Tatiana’s broader research interests include Soviet and contemporary Russian history and culture, political art, cultural privacy studies, queer studies, performance studies, and histories and cultures of LGBT communities in Eastern Europe.