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MemberDr Shayna Sheinfeld

I am currently Honorary Research Fellow at the Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies at Sheffield. I am broadly trained in the Second Temple (including New Testament/Early Christianity) and Rabbinic periods, with a focus on post-exilic and non-canonical Jewish literature, and early Jewish biblical interpretation. My current research combines the study of texts from the 1st and 2nd centuries CE with material evidence to investigate how early Jewish and Christian communities responded to crisis. I am interested in how textual and material evidence reveals ancient attempts to define and establish authority within these communities, and the role of apocalyptic conceptions of the end of days in the composition and interpretation of biblical texts. In addition, I work in contemporary portrayals of the end times, including in Jewish communities in Israel and through American popular culture. I conduct research in gender theory/women and gender studies and I dabble in the afterlives of biblical and apocryphal stories in popular culture, especially in Science Fiction and Dystopian genres. I have served as visiting assistant professor of religion at Centre College and as visiting instructor of Jewish Studies/Religion at Colgate University; I have also taught at McGill University, the University of Kentucky, and Butler University. My courses have covered Judaism/Jewish Studies, Ancient Scripture (both canons and non-canonical literature), and Religion in Antiquity, with a broad array of upper-level courses and graduate courses. In my teaching I use high-impact practices such as community-based learning, and I have mentored and supervised student research. In addition I served as the faculty advisor to the Jewish Students’ Organization, where, in addition advising their activities, I brought in speakers on topics such as anti-semitism and I organized and led the Centre College Passover Seder.

MemberJonathan Weiland

Jon’s research uses traditional classics scholarship, bioarchaeology and digital research methods, to investigate the darker aspects of the ancient world, topics like poverty, disease, slavery and violence.  His master’s thesis explored how malaria affected the landscapes of Roman Italy.  His dissertation focuses on the archaeology of what some refer to as the “Invisible Romans,” the people with the lowest socio-economic status in Italy, such as slaves and peasants.  His other projects include developing effective low-cost 3D modeling techniques for documenting archaeological evidence and using GIS to model ancient travel and exchange. Jon has worked for the Midwest Archaeological Center of the National Park Service, the Archaeological Mapping Lab at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and in Archaeological Collections at the Arizona State Museum.  He has participated in archaeological investigations in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Mexico, Peru, and at several locations in the United States. In his free time Jon enjoys travel, photography, rambling conversation, excessively long walks and binge watching good TV.

MemberLouise Revell

I am a specialist in the archaeology of Rome’s western provinces, and in provincial architecture in particular. I am interested on the impact of empire on the peoples of the provinces, and how it altered the routines of their daily lives. I have also pioneered approaches to the social archaeology of the western provinces, in particular gender and age. I am currently working on religious architecture in Roman Britain.

MemberThenesoya V. Martin De la Nuez

Thenesoya Vidina Martín De la Nuez (Canary Islands, Spain) is currently working as a Visiting Instructor at the Department of Romance Studies at Duke University, North Carolina, while finishing her Ph.D. at the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at Harvard University (Expected 2019). She has worked as a full-time Visiting Instructor at the Department of Hispanic Studies at Vassar College, New York. She was born and raised in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, but has spent most of her adult life in Madrid, where she worked in press (El Mundo). Thenesoya holds an M.A. and B.A. in Comparative Literature at Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain, and a B.A. degree in Hispanic Philology at the Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, with a year at the Università Degli Studi di Torino, Italy. While pursuing her PhD, she created the cultural project CISLANDERUS, about the Canarian immigration to the United States, currently on view at Louisiana State Museum.