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MemberRebekah Pratt-Sturges

I am an art historian with expertise in the chivalric culture of the late Middle Ages and human-animal studies. I specialize in the construction of identity and the role of animals in medieval society. My dissertation, “Illuminating the Medieval Hunt: Power and Performance in Gaston Fébus’ Le livre de Chasse,” examined Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS. fr. 616, an early fifteenth-century illuminated manuscript of Le livre de chasse composed by Gaston Fébus, Count of Foix and Viscount of Béarn (1331-1391), in 1389. My analysis applied critical theoretical frameworks to interpret the manuscript as a meaning-making object within the visual culture of the Middle Ages. I have taught courses in art history, museum studies, humanities, and environmental humanities at NAU since 2013. As a Lecturer in Public Humanities, I now regularly teach classes which explore the public and digital humanities. My teaching areas of research include museum studies (repatriation and cultural heritage) and civic engagement in museums and universities. My classes feature WordPress and the creation of digital exhibitions using the webapplication platform Omeka. In addition to contributing to the Liberal Studies mission at NAU, I promote career readiness in the College of Arts & Letters through classes and workshops devoted to preparing students for graduate studies and careers in the humanities.

MemberGeraldine Heng

Geraldine Heng is Perceval Professor of English and Comparative Literature, with a joint appointment in Middle Eastern studies and Women’s studies.   Heng’s research focuses on literary, cultural, and social encounters between worlds, and webs of exchange and negotiation between communities and cultures, particularly when transacted through issues of gender, race, sexuality, and religion.  She is especially interested in medieval Europe’s discoveries and rediscoveries of Asia and Africa.   Her first book, Empire of Magic: Medieval Romance and the Politics of Cultural Fantasy (Columbia UP, 2003, 2004, 2012), traces the development of a medieval  literary genre—European romance, and, in particular, the King Arthur legend—in response to the traumas of the crusades and crusading history, and Europe’s myriad encounters with the East.   Her second book, The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages (Cambridge UP, March 2018), questions the common assumption that race and racisms only began in the modern era.  Examining Europe’s encounters with Jews, Muslims, Africans, Native Americans, Mongols, and the Romani (“Gypsies”) from the 12th through 15th centuries, the book shows how racial thinking, racial law, racial practices, and racial phenomena existed in Europe before a recognizable vocabulary of race emerged in the West.   Analyzing sources in a variety of media, including stories, maps, statuary, illustrations, architectural features, history, saints’ lives, religious commentary, laws, political and social institutions, economic relations, and literature, the book argues that religion—so much in play again today—enabled the positing of fundamental differences among humans that created strategic essentialism to mark off human groups and populations for radicalized treatment.  The volume also shows how race figured in the emergence of homo europaeus and the identity of Western Europe in this time.   The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages was awarded the 2019 PROSE prize for world history, the 2019 American Academy of Religion prize for historical studies, the 2019 Robert W. Hamilton grand prize, and the Medieval Institute’s 2020 Otto Gründler prize.   Heng’s third (short) book, England and the Jews: How Religion and Violence Created the First Racial State in the West, also with Cambridge, is currently in production.   She is completing a fourth book: Early Globalities: The Interconnected World, 500-1500 CE.     Heng is editor of an MLA Options for Teaching volume on the Global Middle Ages, and co-editor, with Susan Noakes, of the 40-title Cambridge University Press Elements series on the Global Middle Ages, as well as co-editor, with Ayanna Thompson, of the Penn University Press series on early critical race studies, RaceB4Race: Critical Studies of the Premodern.   Heng is also founder and director of the Global Middle Ages Project (G-MAP): http://www.globalmiddleages.org   For more of her work, see her Academia.edu page at: https://utexas.academia.edu/GeraldineHeng   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}  

MemberMichael Miller

I’m a researcher and teacher, in the broad area of philosophy and religion. Slightly narrower, my specialism is Judaism, and narrower still I focus on Jewish mysticism and modern Jewish thought (from Soloveitchik to Benjamin, Rosenzweig, Levinas, et al). However I’m stubbornly interdisciplinary and usually try to cross the boundaries between different aspects of philosophy and speculative thought as well as trying to keep up with current research in scientific, linguistic and psychological fields which connect with my interests. Keeping it broad helps to revitalise intellectual disciplines and keep them exciting. The other area I’m increasingly focusing on in my research and teaching is Black Judaism, especially the Hebrew Israelite movement. I’m also very interested in experimenting with the forms of research, writing and teaching – making these practices more accessible, more artistic, more willing to think outside the usual boxes.

MemberTimothy Luckritz Marquis

Pedagogy, communication, mobility I work in faculty development and instructional design with an emphasis on online and hybrid teaching and learning and intercultural engagement. I also teach Religious Studies, Christian origins, and ancient history. My research and writing explore ancient and modern itinerancy, ancient ethnicity and modern race, gender studies, and biopolitics.

MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberPeter Webster

I am an historian of twentieth century British Christianity, with interests in four interlocking areas: (i) the position of the Church of England in national life, and the question of faith, politics and the law more generally. My 2015 book on Michael Ramsey, archbishop of Canterbury, dealt with this theme, amongst others. (ii) the history of evangelical Christianity, particularly in the UK; (iii) the relationship between the Christian churches and the arts. My most recent book is on Walter Hussey, Anglican patron of the arts; (iv) the digital turn in contemporary history, with a very particular interest in the archived Web as a new kind of historical source. I am based in the south of England, where my day job is being managing director of Webster Research and Consulting, which works with libraries, archives and universities to help understand what users need from digital resources, and working with technologists to meet those needs.

MemberNarasimhananda Swami

Name                                                                   : Swami Narasimhananda Specialisation:  Indian Studies, Indian Philosophy, Sociology of Religion, Translation Studies, Religious Studies, Philosophy of Religion. Present Address                                          : Advaita Ashrama PO Mayavati, Via Lohaghat Dt Champawat, Uttarakhand India. Pincode 262524 Mobile: 9330526514 Email:  narasimhananda@gmail.com Present Work: Monk of Ramakrishna Order since May 1997. Editor of the journal Prabuddha Bharata or The Awakened India since August 2014. Languages Known (Expert Knowledge): English, Hindi, Malayalam, Tamil, and Bengali  Other Current Involvements: Visiting Faculty, Department of Sociology, Jadavpur University. Editor, H-Celebration on H-Net: Humanities and Social Sciences Online. Member, Editorial Board, Reading Religion. Member, International, Interdisciplinary and Interreligious Research Group on ‘Consciousness Studies’, UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights, Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum, Roma, Italy. Member, American Academy of Religion (AAR).

MemberRicky Broome

I’m an independent researcher and early medieval historian based in Leeds. My research covers various aspects of cultural continuity and change in the late Merovingian and early Carolingian worlds, focusing particularly on the eighth century and on aspects of identity, community and otherness. I’m especially interested in hagiography and the process of conversion from paganism to Christianity. Available to review books/articles on these or related topics. Please email me to discuss: rickybroome@hotmail.com