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MemberMargaret Freeman

  Margaret H. Freeman is Professor Emerita, Los Angeles Valley College, and co-director of Myrifield Institute for Cognition and the Arts (myrifield.org). She was a founding member and first president (1988-1992) of the Emily Dickinson International Society and moderates the monthly meetings of the Emily Dickinson Reading Circle at Myrifield in Heath, MA. She is a co-editor of the Oxford University Press series in Cognition and Poetics. Her research interests include cognitive poetics, aesthetics, linguistics, and literature. A list of her scholarly publications may be found at http://margarethfreeman.wordpress.com/publications/.  

MemberAndrew Filmer

Senior Lecturer in Theatre and Performance at Aberystwyth University. Co-convenor of the International Federation of Theatre Research (IFTR) Theatre Architecture Working Group (2012 to the present). I moved to Aberystwyth in 2008 having previously taught at the University of Sydney, the University of New South Wales and the University of Western Sydney.

MemberKathleen B. Neal

Political culture fascinates me, and in particular the design and deployment of rhetoric for political effect. I study this in the context of 13th-14th c. English royal administration and its domestic and diplomatic interlocutors. I am also interested in the question of women’s power, and especially their participation in diplomatic exchange. Currently completing my monograph on royal letters in the reign of Edward I, and about to begin work on a new project injustice and advice with my colleague Prof. Constant Mews. Cover image: Lincolnshire County Archive BNLW 1/1/55/1, c.1230-1250 (image, K. Neal).

MemberJames Fitzmaurice

My present research focuses on connections between the visual arts and Margaret Cavendish’s poetry, fiction, and drama. My sense of visual arts is derived from research into painting, prints, and drawings that were available for Cavendish to see when she lived in Antwerp during the 1650s and in England in the 1660s. She thought of herself as a woman who painted in words and sometimes commented on art as it was collected for and displayed in country houses. She and her husband wrote within (and against) traditions of the representation of art and country houses found in the writings of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson.

MemberBill Hughes

Bill Hughes was awarded a PhD in English Literature in 2010 from the University of Sheffield on communicative rationality and the Enlightenment dialogue in relation to the formation of the English novel. His research interests are in eighteenth-century literature; cultural and literary theory, particularly Raymond Williams, the Bakhtin circle, and the Frankfurt school; genre theory; aesthetics; intertextuality and the Semantic Web; and paranormal romance. He is co-founder, with Dr Sam George, of the Open Graves, Open Minds: Vampires and the Undead in Modern Culture Project at the University of Hertfordshire. He has publications out or forthcoming on Jane Austen, Elizabeth Hamilton, Frances Burney, Sydney Owenson, Bernard Mandeville, Maria Edgeworth, and Charlotte Smith. Bill has also published on Richard Hoggart, with contributions in Richard Hoggart and Cultural Studies, ed. by Sue Owen (Palgrave, 2008), and Richard Hoggart: Culture and Critique, ed. by Michael Bailey and Mary Eagleton (Critical, Cultural and Communications Press, 2011). In addition, he is researching contemporary vampire literature and paranormal romance, co-editing (with Dr George) and contributing to two collections: ‘Open Graves, Open Minds’: Vampires and the Undead from the Enlightenment to the Present (Manchester University Press, 2013); and In the Company of Wolves: Werewolves, Wolves, and Wild Children (Manchester University Press, 2020) and with articles forthcoming on the eighteenth-century novel and paranormal romance. This apparently disparate research is not unfocused; it has at its core Bill’s concerns with the Enlightenment as viewed through the theory of Habermas and the Marxist tradition.

MemberJohn Hobbins

The languages of the Bible have been my passion since I was 15 years old. While in high school, I was introduced to modern Hebrew by Ruth Ann Driss (now Guthmann), biblical Hebrew by Menahem Mansoor, Aramaic and Ugaritic by Keith Schoville, and New Testament Greek by John Linton, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I went on to pursue ancient Near Eastern Studies at the University of Toronto. I studied Hebrew with E. J. Revell, J. J. M. Roberts, Stanley Walters, and John Wevers, Aramaic with E. G. Clarke, Hellenistic Greek with Al Pietersma, Syriac with D. J. Lane, Akkadian with A. K. Grayson, and Sumerian with R. F. G. Sweet. I would go back and forth to Wisconsin during my undergraduate days. I served as a research assistant for Michael V. Fox at the UW-Madison as he prepared his books on Song of Songs and Qohelet. I earned an M.A. degree at the UW-Madison and taught Elementary and Intermediate Biblical Hebrew there. My studies of Hebrew and other Northwest Semitic languages continued under Michael Fox, David McCarthy, and Ron Troxel. I studied for a year at the Pontifical Biblical Institute-Rome with Mitchell Dahood, Luis Alonso Schoekel, and many others. I earned a graduate degree at the Waldensian Theological Seminary-Rome with a dissertation under the supervision of J. Alberto Soggin on First Isaiah. Mario Liverani was the “corelatore.” The thesis was accepted for publication by Paideia editrice. I chose not to see it published at the time. I taught Hebrew at the seminary while a student there, and seminars on the Old Testament later while serving as a pastor in Sicily. I studied a year at the Kirchliche Hochschule Bethel in Bielefeld, Germany under the guidance of Frank Cruesemann and Christof Hardmeier. I am an ordained pastor in the Waldensian Church – Union of Waldensian and Methodist Churches in Italy. Currently my wife Paola serves United Methodist congregations in Wisconsin. I serve Lutheran congregations in the church body known as LCMC (Lutheran Congregations in Mission for Christ). We have three children: Giovanni, Elisabetta, and Anna. I taught Hebrew at the Waldensian Theological Seminary in Rome and the University of Wisconsin-Madison; I taught “Bible and Current Events” in the Anthropology & Religious Studies Department at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. I am a member of editorial board of the Journal of the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament. I currently teach Hebrew in July of each year for Trinity Lutheran Seminary (Lutheran Church of the South Sudan) in Gambella, Ethiopia.