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MemberNelson Goering

I’m a linguist and philologist specialized in the earlier history of the Germanic languages, including Old and Middle English, Old Norse, Gothic, Old Frisian, Old Saxon, and Old High German. I currently hold a British Academy postdoctoral fellowship to research Norse Influence on Middle English Prosody. Based on this work, I am preparing a book manuscript synthesizing the phonological and metrical evidence for foot structure in medieval English and Old Norse. I maintain a broad interest in what used to be called Germanic comparative philology, including the phonological and morphological development of the Germanic languages from Proto-Indo-European. This field combines close attention to ancient and medieval texts as the primary sources for information about older languages, and a grounding in the typology of languages around the world and current thinking about the possibilities and constraints concerning how languages and Language in general work. My ongoing blog series The History of the English Language in A Hundred Words aims to bring the full history of English, from its earliest reconstructible prehistory to the present day, to a wider public in a readable and reliable way.

MemberJohn M. Hill

Medieval English literature, anthropology, psychology, Shakespeare and screen writing.
I have published books, essays and articles on Old English heroic poetry, especially BEOWULF, on aesthetics, on Chaucer and on various works in the early modern, Romantic and Victorian periods. I teach undergraduates primarily and value a broad engagement with the run of English language and literature.

MemberScott Kleinman

I am Professor of English at California State University, Northridge, where I have taught since August 1999. Prior to coming to Northridge, I taught at the University of Missouri, Columbia. I work on medieval language and literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the fourteenth century with a special emphasis on Old English and early Middle English. My early work was on the history of the English language during the Old English period, especially the development of phonology and its dialects. More recently I have worked on regional and cultural diversity in historiographical and romance literature. I have a strong interest in Digital Humanities, particularly computational text analysis and digital editing. 

MemberAlexander D'Alisera

Welcome to my profile! I am currently a Ph.D. student at Boston College, where I am a historian of late ancient and early medieval Europe, focusing especially on the interconnected world of the North Sea. My current research interests include: medieval interactions with caves and the underground; lived religion in early medieval Britain and Ireland; the medieval reception of Christian apocryphal texts; and Old English literature, especially “The Dream of the Rood” and “The Legend of the Seven Sleepers.” I also have secondary interests in media theory, the history of the museum, eco-criticism, and the study of medievalisms in contemporary speculative fiction. From 2015 to 2017, I attended Yale University as a Marquand Scholar, where I received my M.A. in religion from the Divinity School. I also hold my B.A. in history and classics from Bard College, where I attended from 2011 to 2015 as an Excellence and Equal Cost Scholar. I am currently a member of the Medieval Academy of America and the North American Society for the Study of Christian Apocryphal Literature, as well as a charter member of the Global Late Antiquity Society.

MemberJames Tauber

I work at the intersection of computing, philology, and linguistics both as an independent scholar and as a software developer working on digital humanities projects with other scholars. My interests include morphology (theoretical, computational, and historical), Indo-European linguistics, Linguistic Linked Open Data, text encoding and annotation of historical language corpora (especially Ancient Greek but also Old English and Old Norse), machine-actionable language description, computer-aided historical language learning (especially Ancient Greek but also Old English and Old Norse).

MemberFiona Tolhurst

Academic interests: medieval Arthurian literature in Latin, Old French, and Middle English; medieval women writers (especially Julian of Norwich); and medieval and renaissance drama.Personal interests: singing in an Anglican choir (alto), hiking, walking my Australian Shepherd, and visiting castles.

MemberStephen Hopkins

I work on all things apocrypha in Medieval religious literature, taking a comparative philological approach. My dissertation tracks the transmission of infernal apocrypha (especially the Gospel of Nicodemus and Vision of St. Paul) across Old English, Old Norse, Middle Welsh, and Old/Middle Irish texts and translations. My idea of a good time is scrutinizing vernacular translations of theologically-oriented works, and thinking about the history of emotions and temporality. My favorite sport is etymology. I’m also into Ghost Stories (especially those of M.R. James), Horror, Medievalism (Tolkien and Lewis), and Vikings.

MemberMelissa Ridley Elmes

I specialize in the medieval British Isles and North Atlantic World, with emphasis on Old and Middle English, Anglo- Norman, Welsh, and Old Norse/Icelandic languages, literatures, and cultures, alongside interests in premodern Irish, Scottish, and French literature and culture as well. I have a broad range of research and teaching interests, including Arthuriana; Chaucer; Robin Hood/outlawry; women’s and gender studies, particularly women’s literate practices; alchemy, magic, and esoterica; monsters and the supernatural; hagiography; literature and the law; genre studies in romance, chronicle, dream vision, mystic and devotional literature; cultural and historical literary studies (feasts and feasting; disasters and delights; violence and trauma; chivalry and courtliness; dreams and dreaming; landscapes and the environment; medieval afterlives); comparative literature; ecocritical and animal studies; manuscript studies/ text technologies and history of the English language. I am trained as an interdisciplinary literary historian, and as a scholar I am interested in the relationships between texts and the cultures that produce them, and invested in the ways in which multiple methodologies can be used in tandem to create a more focused and nuanced lens on a single subject. To that end, I make use of theoretical paradigms and methods from English, History, Art History, Anthropology, Culture/ Material and Gender Studies, among others, in my research and writing.