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MemberGlenda Goodman

  I am a historian of music who specializes in American music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. My avenues of inquiry include the material culture of music and book history, amateur music-making and gender, and soundscapes of colonialism. My book, Cultivated by Hand: Amateur Musicians in the Early American Republic, brings together the history of gender, books, and labor to explore the little-known world of amateur music-making by women and men in the first generation after the American Revolution. I am currently working on a new project on Christian sacred music and settler colonialism in the eighteenth century. This project explores the territorializing role of music and sound in settler colonialism, as well as the ways in which the adoption and adaptation of Protestant hymnody by Native Americans (primarily Haudenosaunee Six Nations and Southern New England Algonquian-language group speakers). The first fruits of this research can be seen in my article on the lost music manuscript books of Joseph Johnson (a Mohegan Christian), which appeared in the Journal of the Society for American Music’s special issue on “Settler Sounds: Music, Indigeneity, and Colonialism in the Americas” (Fall 2019). My other articles have appeared in the Journal of the American Musicological Society, the Journal of the Society for American Music, the William and Mary Quarterly, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and the Journal of the Royal Musical Association (forthcoming Fall 2020), and edited collections. I teach courses on American music, women and music, popular music, and methods for the study of music history. My graduate seminars address topics in eighteenth-century studies, such as music and revolution, sacred music and settler colonialism; and methods/materials courses on music and book history, and archive studies. My approach to teaching and scholarship is fundamentally interdisciplinary. By training and inclination, I am very much a historian; I also have a background as a performer (I studied viola at Oberlin and Juilliard, where I played mostly experimental and contemporary music). Collaboration is important to me and I am in the middle of a large-scale collaborative interdisciplinary project with historian Rhae Lynn Barnes entitled American Contact: Intercultural Encounter and the History of the Book, which entails a symposium, a volume, and a digital humanities project. A second collaborative project with Dr. Barnes is on the topic “Early American Music and the Construction of Race.”  

MemberPaul Michael Kurtz

My research centers on intellectual culture in Germany from 1795 to 1920, with a focus on the history of the humanities – especially classical, biblical, orientalist, and theological scholarship. Thus far, I have concentrated on representations of ancient Judaism and their embeddedness in modern cultural, political, and religious complexes. These inquiries contribute, more broadly, to historiography, European history, and history of knowledge.

MemberSben Korsh

I am an MPhil Candidate in the History and Theory of Architecture and Urbanism at the University of Hong Kong, completing a thesis about stock exchange architecture in Hong Kong. In August 2020, I will begin a PhD in Architecture at the University of Michigan. I recently completed an appointment as the 2018-19 Emerging Curator at the Canadian Center for Architecture in Montréal, where I co-led a curatorial research project entitled Market Landscape. In the past, I have assisted on architectural exhibitions at the City Gallery of Hong Kong, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Institute for Public Architecture in New York, and UC Berkeley’s Wurster Gallery. I have edited collections for The Architecture Lobby and the Aggregate Architectural History Collaborative. I hold a BA from the City University of New York and an MS from the University of California, Berkeley, both in architectural history.

MemberSpencer Keralis

Spencer D. C. Keralis is a scholar of the past, present, and future of the book. Dr. Keralis is the Founder and Executive Director of Digital Frontiers, a conference and community that brings together the makers and users of digital resources for humanities research, teaching, and learning. Founded in 2012, the conference celebrates it’s 8th anniversary at the University of Texas at Austin in September 2019. Dr Keralis is currently Assistant Professor and Digital Humanities Librarian with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University Library. Dr. Keralis previously served as Research Associate Professor and Head of the Digital Humanities and Collaborative Programs Unit with the Public Services Division of the University of North Texas Libraries. He also served a lecturer in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication at the University of Texas at Dallas, as an adjunct instructor in the UNT Department of English, and has taught in the UNT i-School. He holds a Ph.D. in English and American Literature from New York University. His research has appeared in Book History, a special issue American Periodicals on children’s periodicals, and in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) reports The Problem of Data (2012) and Research Data Management: Principles, Practices, and Prospects (2013). Dr. Keralis’s work on labor ethics in digital humanities pedagogy is forthcoming in Disrupting the Digital Humanities, and the Modern Language Association publication Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments. Dr. Keralis has held a Mellon Fellowship at the Library Company of Philadelphia, a Legacy Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society, a Summer Residency at the Queer Zine Archive Project, and served as a CLIR Fellow in Academic Libraries with the University of North Texas Libraries. In 2017, he was honored with the Innovative Outreach Award for the Digital Frontiers project by the Texas Digital Library.

MemberVeronica Popp

Veronica Popp is an activist and writer from Chicago. She has a Bachelor’s from Elmhurst College in English and History, a Master’s in Creative Writing from Aberystwyth University and a Master’s in English with a concentration in Literary Studies from Western Illinois University. Popp is an Organizer for the United Academics Campaign, an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers. She has been published in The Collagist, PenCambria, Popular Culture Studies Journal, Journal of Fandom Studies, Journal of Popular Culture, Still Point Arts Quarterly, Gender Forum, Rag Queen Periodical, The Last Line, Bitch Media, and Bust. Popp was Essayist in Residence for Rag Queen Periodical, nominated for the Silver Pen Writers Association Writing Well Award and longlisted for the New Welsh Review Writing Awards 2017 AmeriCymru Prize. Last year, she was a Teaching Artist and Co-Editor of student writing for Young Chicago Authors. The resulting work titled The End of Chiraq will be published by Northwestern University Press this Fall. Popp also teaches composition at Elmhurst College. Her research interests include feminist film studies, queer theory, creative writing and pedagogy. Popp recently completed her first novel, The Longest Summer, out for submission to literary agents. Popp serves on the Modern Language Association Committee for Contingent Labor in the Profession and believes the feminization of adjunct labor is a growing concern. Popp has given public readings across Chicago including, Reading Under the Influence, Strange Hour, and Bring Your Own Diary.

MemberAnna Sagal

I have two ongoing research projects. The first, entitled Resisting Gardens: Pedagogy & Natural History in Eighteenth-Century Women’s Literature, examines a selection of works of literature and art by women that engage with scientific subjects; genres include periodicals, textbooks, paper mosaics (collages), paintings, and conduct of life works. Utilizing the framework of critical plant studies, this project makes the argument for a radical tradition of women’s naturalist labor that challenges prevailing models of human-nature dynamics. I have also begun preliminary research on a second project, Flora Abroad: Eighteenth-Century Women and Colonial Botany. While still in its early conceptual stages, this project traces the intellectual and artistic productions of women who studied the natural world in the Caribbean, America, Canada, and other European colonies.

MemberJohanna Mellis

I am an Assistant Professor of World history at Ursinus College, outside of Philadelphia. I teach courses in World and European history. My courses include “GOAL! Sport in World History, “Nationalism and Memory in Modern Europe,” “Empire, Patriarchy, and Race: Power and People in Modern World History,” “Cold War in Europe: Gender, Labor, and Immigrants,” and “Oral History: Collecting All Voices.” My manuscript-in-progress, titled Changing the Game: Hungarian Athletes and International Sport during the Cold War, explores an uncharted, human aspect of Cold War cultural history: how Hungarian athletes shaped the sport world from 1948-1989. Hungary’s impressive sport history and geopolitical status – it became the third-strongest world sport power under Stalinism and later served the IOC as an intermediary with more contentious Communist countries – make the Hungarian sport community a compelling case study to examine Cold War international culture. The project examines the motivations and evolving relationship between the IOC and Hungarian sport leaders on the one hand, and sport leaders and Hungarian athletes on the other. It argues that international sport was not simply an arena for Communist repression and traditional Cold War cultural and diplomatic tensions to play out. Rather, the manuscript demonstrates how athletes, sport leaders, and the IOC engaged in sporting cooperation with one another in order to achieve their respective aims from the 1960s-1980s. Athletes influenced international sport through their increased agency vis-a-vis, and cooperation with, sport leaders, who in turned worked collegially with the IOC to shape its culture and international policies in order to benefit athletes at home. In one of the first Cold War analyses grounded in athletes’ experiences and memories, I situate their voices in the international sport world by triangulating thirty-five oral histories with Hungarian athletes, coaches, and sport leaders with archival documents from Hungary, Switzerland, and the US. Although typically portrayed as helpless victims or wily resistors, the experiences of Hungarian athletes demonstrate how they asserted agency by choosing to work with sport leaders to improve their lives. Changing the Global Gamedirects scholars of Eastern Europe, Sport History, and the Cold War toward Hungary and demonstrates that histories examining international culture and the Cold War must consider the ways in which people’s actions in the less-contentious Middle Bloc states navigated and shaped the creation of both. My research has been awarded numerous prestigious grants, including the Olympic Studies Centre’s PhD Research Grant, the North American Society for sport History Dissertation Travel Grant, and a Fulbright Grant. I have also received several Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to study Hungary.