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MemberNatalie Berkman

Natalie Berkman is a higher education specialist, currently working as the Directrice pédagogique (Academic Manager) at SAE Institute Paris. With almost a decade of experience in pedagogy, curriculum design, research, mentoring, and academic administration, she is also currently consulting with ViaX and Crimson Education. Natalie earned her B.A. from Johns Hopkins University with a triple major in French Literature, Mathematics, and Writing Seminars in 2011 and an M.A. in French Literature from Princeton University in 2013. She completed her Ph.D. in French Literature at Princeton University with a dissertation on the mathematical methods of the OuLiPo (Ouvoir de Littérature Potentielle), recently selected as the winner of the 2019 Peter Lang Young Scholars Competition in French Studies and under contract with Peter Lang Oxford (forthcoming in 2021). Her secondary research interests include Digital Humanities, video game studies, and Italian studies.

MemberAgata Lulkowska

Interdisciplinary researcher, photographer and filmmaker. Agata Lulkowska holds a practice-based PhD in film and Latin American studies from Birkbeck, University of London. Her research focuses on the politics of visual representation among the Arhuaco community from Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia. She used collaborative filmmaking as a method. Lulkowska also holds Master’s Degree in Film and Media Studies at Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland, unfinished MA in Film Direction at Silesian University, Katowice, Poland, and a First Class Honours degree in Digital Media Arts at London South Bank University. Alongside her research work, she actively exhibits her visual work in wide international circles such as Tokyo, Paris, Amsterdam, Barcelona, London, Bologna. Lulkowska’s research addresses questions of representation, otherness, and intercultural communication. She is particularly interested in the way film and video circulate in international circles, and how the aspect of communication transcends the cultural barriers. She lived and worked on three different continents, and she is trilingual.

MemberGabrielle Cornish

Gabrielle Cornish is a PhD candidate in Musicology at the Eastman School of Music. Her research broadly considers music and everyday life in the Soviet Union. In particular, her dissertation traces the intersections between music, technology, and the politics of “socialist modernity” after Stalinism. Her research in Russia has been supported by the Fulbright Program, the Glenn Watkins Traveling Fellowship, and the Cohen-Tucker Dissertation Research Fellowship from the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. For the 2019-2020 academic year, Gabrielle will be supported by a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship as well as an honorary Alvin H. Johnson AMS-50 Fellowship from the American Musicological Society. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in the Journal of Musicology, Sounding Out!Slate, and The Washington Post. She has appeared as a guest to discuss Russian history, culture, and politics on NBC Nightly News, BBC World Service Television, and BBC Radio Newsday. In her free time, she performs Russian-to-English translation, does freelance graphic design, and makes loud (and soft) noises on drums.

MemberZachary Kaiser

In my work, which critically engages with my background as a designer working in the tech industry, I take up the mantle of the artist-as-experimenter[1]—questioning “the limits of preconstituted fields… along with the accepted criteria of judgment by which they would be held to account”[2]—in order to critique Graphic Design’s participation in the distribution of the sensible[3]—the delimiting of sensory experience that determines how we participate as political subjects. Graphic Design and User Experience Design guide us as we experience the world, allowing us to perceive some things while concealing others, and, therefore, shaping our modes of participation. In my creative work, I render the invisible visible, illuminating the politics of design in technology, as well as the ideas about the future embedded within our technologies themselves. I seek to contextualize, critique, and, maybe optimistically, modify the way that Design distributes the sensible, the way it shapes our understanding of ourselves as political subjects through our technologies, and how this circumscribes the way we imagine the future. To do so, I carve an intellectual space that utilizes a constellation of theories and methods from the fine arts, Science and Technology Studies (STS), Cultural Studies, Media Studies, and Philosophy. [1] Lyotard, Jean-François. 2003. “The tomb of the intellectual,” in Jean-François Lyotard: Political Writings. London: UCL Press, 3. [2] Hall, Gary. 2016. The Uberfication of the University. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 49. [3] Rancière, Jacques. The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible. New York: Continuum.

MemberBrian Beaton

I’m an Associate Professor at Cal Poly, a STEM campus within the 23-campus California State University (CSU) System. I helped to develop and launch Cal Poly’s interdisciplinary Science, Technology and Society (STS) program and the Center for Expressive Technologies. Before joining the faculty at Cal Poly, I was a full-time professor in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh (now the “School of Computing and Information”). I helped to develop and launch the University of Pittsburgh’s Community Informatics Research Group, as well as directed the Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology, an endowed research unit dedicated to the study of IT and society trends. CAL POLY

  • Associate Professor (2019-)
  • Director of the Center for Expressive Technologies (2015-2018)
  • Assistant Professor (2015-2019)
  • Program Coordinator & Embedded Researcher, California Cyber Training Complex (2016-2017)

SCHOOL OF INFORMATION SCIENCES,  UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

  • Assistant Professor (2012-2015)
  • Interim Director of the Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology (2013-2015)
  • Co-PI, iSchool Inclusion Institute (2014-2015) [Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant #21300668]
  • Co-Director, Community Informatics Research Group (2012-2015)
  • Faculty Affiliate, Graduate Program for Cultural Studies (2013-2015)

MemberHelen Armstrong

Helen Armstrong views design from across the spectrum of a practicing designer, a college professor and a published author. She is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design at North Carolina State University. In addition to teaching, Armstrong works as principle of her company. Strong Design. Her clients have included Johns Hopkins, T. Rowe Price, US internetworking and Euler ACI. Her work has been recognized by Print and How Magazine and highlighted in numerous design publications. She currently serves on the editorial board of Design and Culture and as a member of the AIGA National Board of Directors and is a past co-chair of the AIGA Design Educators Community Steering Committee. Armstrong authored Graphic Design Theory: Readings from the Field (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009) and co-authored Participate: Designing with User-Generated Content (Princeton Architectural Press, 2011) with Zvezdana Stojmirovic. Her new book Digital Design Theory: Readings from the Field explores works by both designers and programmers, examining the two threads of discourse—design and computation—that have rapidly merged to define contemporary graphic design.