Search

MemberAyse Cavdar

Graduated from Ankara University, Journalism Dept. Received a Masters’ degree in history, from Bogazici University.  Completed her Ph.D. thesis entitled “the Loss of Modesty: The Adventure of Muslim Family from Neighborhood to Gated Community” at the European University of Viadrina, in 2014 (supported by Global Prayers Project initiated by MetroZones). Worked for Helsinki Citizens Assembly’s project entitled “Citizens Network for Peace, Reconciliation and Human Security” in Western Balkans and Turkey. She served as a visiting scholar at the Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps Universiy, Marburg, in 2016. She has been a postdoc fellow in Käte Hamburger Kolleg/Center for Global Cooperation Research, in Duisburg, during 2018. She is recently a visiting scholar at CNMS, Philipps University, Marburg.

MemberJakub Drabik

One central element of my interest has been the history of fascism, particularly British and Czech fascism. My work, however, covers a broad range of topics, including European fascisms, British and Czechoslovak history as well as the history of Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th Century. I am currently writing a book on Fascism (definition, history, manifestations) that should be published in 2018 as the first publication of its kind in Slovak language. I am also currently working on the study on the continuities and discontinuities of political elites in Czechoslovakia after the Soviet invasion and crushing of the Prague spring in 1968. One of my side projects is also focused on Czech/Czechoslovak fascism, which has been much overlooked in Western historiography I have completed my doctorate at Charles university in Prague and spent the academic year 2012/2013 as a visiting research scholar at Oxford Brookes working on my dissertation with professor Roger Griffin. Apart from that I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to spend some time as a visiting research scholar at Wroclaw university in 2014 and enjoyed numerous research visits in London, Sheffield, Birmingham, Coventry, Bolton, Budapest etc. Since then I have published two books on BUF and Oswald Mosley (in Czech) and numerous scholarly articles on fascism, fascist propaganda and BUF. I am currently working at the Institute of History, Slovak Academy of sciences in Bratislava and as an external teacher at the Masaryk university in Brno. I also work as a deputy editor-in-chief at HistoryWeb.sk and regularly write for Slovak dailies. Supervisors: Prof. Roger Griffin, Prof. Martin Kovář a Dr. Jaromir Soukup

MemberKoca Mehmet Kentel

I am an urban and environmental historian of late Ottoman Istanbul, and the Research Projects Manager at Istanbul Research Institute. I am also the Associate Editor of YILLIK: Annual of Istanbul Studies. I received my Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Washington in December 2018 with my doctoral dissertation, “Assembling ‘Cosmopolitan’ Pera: An Infrastructural History of Late Ottoman Istanbul. I am very much interested in public scholarship and exhibition curation. I am the curator of the recently opened exhibition Hafıza-i Beşer: Osmanlı Yazmalarından Hikâyeler // Memories of Humankind: Stories from the Ottoman Manuscripts, at the Istanbul Research Institute (October 18, 2019 – July 25, 2020). I was the Co-Curator for The Characters of Yusuf Franko: An Ottoman Bureaucrat’s Caricatures exhibition, held at Koc University’s ANAMED from January to June, 2017. I authored the exhibition texts and I was the main curator behind http://www.yusuffranko.ku.edu.tr. The exhibition will travel to Beirut in 2020. My doctoral research and writing were supported through fellowships and scholarships by International Journal for Urban and Regional Research Foundation, University of Washington’s Simpson Center, Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations, University of Washington Hall-Ammerer-Washington Research Foundation, University of Washington Graduate School, and University of Washington Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations Department. Between 2015-2017, I was the Head Librarian of Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations in Istanbul. My work as the Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED) Head Librarian involved in managing the library’s collection development, organizing library events, coordinating the library’s future plans with Koç University Library and ANAMED managements, and supporting both institutions by the library’s resources and services, as well as through my personal skills. In my capacity as ANAMED Head Librarian, I also co-coordinated BiblioPera: Beyoğlu Research Centers Network from September 2015. Supported by Istanbul Development Agency, BiblioPera brings together 9 research centers located in Beyoğlu, Istanbul. The project was awarded the 1st Prize at Koç University’s Most Successful Employees Awards 2016.

MemberMichael David-Fox

Michael David-Fox is a historian of modern Russia and the USSR, whose work has ranged from cultural and political history to transnational studies and modernity theory. At the outset of his career, he became one of the first foreign researchers to work in formerly closed Communist Party archives during the collapse of the Soviet Union. He went on to become a founding editor of Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History [https://kritika.georgetown.edu/], now based at Georgetown, a transformative journal that has helped to internationalize the field of Russian Studies. For this, he received the 2010 Distinguished Editor Award from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. In a series of books, nine edited volumes, twelve edited special theme issues of journals, and over forty-five articles and chapters, David-Fox has probed unexpected connections between culture and politics, institutions and mentalities, and domestic and international shifts. His latest work explores covert entanglements across borders, ideologies, and cultures. He has strong interests in transnational and comparative history and in the history of Russian-German relations, broadly conceived, as well as in the history of the Russian Revolution and Stalinism. David-Fox received his A.B. from Princeton and his PhD from Yale. He is author of Revolution of the Mind: Higher Learning among the Bolsheviks, 1918-1929 (1997); Showcasing the Great Experiment: Cultural Diplomacy and Western Visitors to the Soviet Union, 1921-1941 (2012, translated into Russian and Chinese, a Choice Outstanding Academic Title); Crossing Borders: Modernity, Ideology, and Culture in Russia and the Soviet Union (2015, under translation into Russian, winner of the 2016 Historia Nova Prize for Best Book in Russian Intellectual and Cultural History). David-Fox has been a Humboldt Fellow (Germany), a visiting professor at the Centre russe, EHESS (France), and was awarded the title of honorary professor from Samara State University (Russia). He has been a visiting scholar or fellow at the W. Averill Harriman Institute at Columbia University, the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies, the Mershon Center for Studies in International Security and Public Policy, the National Academy of Education, the Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University, the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (2017). His current book project, “Smolensk under Nazi and Soviet Rule,” is a study of the exercise of power in a Russian region under Stalinism and the German occupation during WWII. Aiming squarely at the place where regional history meets the grand narrative, it cross-fertilizes three rapidly evolving fields: the study of Stalinism, German occupation on the Eastern Front during World War II, and the Holocaust. Since 2013, David-Fox has served as scholarly advisor to the International Centre for the History and Sociology of World War II and its Consequences at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow.

MemberSamantha Lomb

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Foreign Languages at Vyatka State University in Kirov, Russia, where I have been teaching since 2012. I completed my PhD in History at the University of Pittsburgh in 2014. My research focuses on the Stalinist 1930’s. My first publication, “Personal and Political: A Microhistory of the “Red Column” Collective Farm, 1935-36,” was published in January 2016 in The Carl Beck Papers in Russian and East European Studies.  In addition to this monograph, my book, Stalin’s Constitution: Soviet Participatory Politics and the Discussion of the 1936 Draft Constitution, was published in  November 2017 by Routledge.  The book uses a regional focus to examine the discourse between the central state leadership and citizens about the new Soviet social contract, the 1936 Soviet Constitution.

MemberStephanie Spoto

Stephanie Spoto is a lecturer at California State University, Monterey Bay in the department of Humanities and Communication, teaching literature, feminist theory, and writing. In 2013 she was an International Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Advanced Study – Sofia.  Her research project is “William Lithgow (1582–1645) and Early Modern Scottish Journeys to Eastern Europe”. Education: Stephanie finished her B.A. in English at the University of California in Irvine in 2006, writing her undergraduate thesis on gender and censorship in Milton’s Paradise Lost. She began her PhD at Edinburgh, and was awarded the Centre for Renaissance Studies Research Grant (2009).  At Edinburgh University, she taught first-year English Literature, and has been a reviewer and Reader for the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in Fiction (2010), Biography (2011) and has reviewed for the Forum Postgraduate Journal (2011).  Her dissertation passed with minor corrections, and she graduated in June 2012. She also works as a bookdealer, and enjoys baking cakes and riding her bicycle. Research Interests: Stephanie’s dissertation chronicled the history of European occult philosophy, focusing on Hermeticism and demonology, in order to create a theory of gender within English seventeenth century demonological studies. She is currently working on two research projects:

  • Scottish perceptions of Islam in the seventeenth century
  • A comparative analysis of seeing and recognition in the work of Sartre, Wittgenstein, and Fanon

Her other research interests include anarchism, feminist and queer theory, monstrosity, intersectionality, and teaching methods.

MemberTatiana Klepikova

Tatiana Klepikova is a Faculty of Arts & Science Postdoctoral Fellow at the Women & Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto, where she is working on her postdoctoral project about contemporary Russian queer theater and drama. She defended her Ph.D. in Slavic Literary Studies at the University of Passau, Germany, in 2019, after obtaining degrees in Teaching Foreign Languages (English and Spanish) in Yaroslavl (Russia), and Russian and East-Central European Studies in Passau. She is co-editor of several collections of interdisciplinary essays on privacy, including Outside the “Comfort Zone”: Private and Public Spheres in Late Socialist Europe (forthcoming in 2020 by De Gruyter). Tatiana’s work strives to capture and elucidate sites, experiences, and articulations of “marginality” in Russian cultural imagination, especially in literature, media, and the arts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. A meeting point of hegemonic and alternative discourses, “marginality” as a social, political, and cultural construct fascinates her by the multiplicity of meanings and readings that may be (counter-)coded in it. It thereby has immense potential to reveal the structures of power, control, and difference that have to do not only with political oppression, but also with imaginativeness and agency, which are often overlooked in connection to (neo)authoritarian settings like Russia. Tatiana’s broader research interests include Soviet and contemporary Russian history and culture, political art, cultural privacy studies, queer studies, performance studies, and histories and cultures of LGBT communities in Eastern Europe.

MemberVictoria Phillips

Victoria Phillips is the author of Martha Graham’s Cold War: The Dance of American Diplomacy, which explores the international political life of Martha Graham to promote the United States on in over thirty nations for every presidential administration from Franklin D. Roosevelt through George H.W. Bush. She has begun her next work, a political biography of Eleanor Lansing Dulles in divided Cold War Europe, 1945-1961. Through Columbia University’s Cultural Initiative at the European Institute, Victoria runs the Cold War Archival Research Project (CWAR) and takes advanced students from Columbia, the London School of Economics, and West Point Military Academy to archives in the US and Europe to conduct primary research on Cold War power, and the intersection of soft and hard. She was a Lecturer in History at the European Institute and Department of History, Associated Faculty at the Harriman Institute, visiting professor at the Institute of International Relations at Corvinus University of Budapest and a Distinguished Fellow at its Institute for Advanced Studies, and will continue in 2020 as a Visiting Fellow in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics.    Her articles have appeared in such varied publications as the New York TimesAmerican Communist History, Grant’s Interest Rate Observer, Dance ChronicleBallet News, and Dance Research Journal. She has curated several public exhibitions in the United States and Europe, and has lectured at renowned universities, colleges, high schools, arts academies, and international institutes. At present she serves on the boards of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the European Institute at Columbia University, The British Academy of Dance Scholars, and the Historic Dance Theatre. She is on the editorial boards of American Communist History and Dance Chronicle. Her primary research is held at the Library of Congress as the Victoria Phillips Collection. She is the Chair of the SHAFR Task Force on Remote Research in response to the current COVID crisis.  

MemberRyan T. Goodman

My research explores the intersection of gender and political culture in England and surrounding realms in the transition from the early to central (or ‘high’) middle ages, c. AD 900-1200, with a particular focus on the relationship between the ideals and practice of masculinity and kingship. I recently completed my PhD in Medieval History at the University of Manchester. My dissertation was entitled ‘”In a Father’s Place”: Anglo-Saxon Kingship and Masculinity in the Long Tenth Century.’ I completed my BA in History and Medieval & Renaissance Studies (2008) and my MA in European History (2012) at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC, where my MA thesis explored ‘The Role of Royal Power in the Formation of an Anglo-Saxon State, circa 400-900 AD.’ I previously served, from 2012–2015, as a Teaching Instructor in East Carolina University’s Department of History, as part of the Italy Intensives study abroad program based in Certaldo, Tuscany. While there, I also served as the program’s Academic Coordinator and Writing Center Director, as well as the Scholarship Committee Chair, Student Life Director, and Social Media Coordinator.

DepositRoman Jakobson and the Transition of German Thought to the Structuralist Paradigm

This short paper, rather than providing a thorough analysis of the very broad theme entailed by its title, aims only to programmatically outline the contours of a general framework for future research on structuralism and its genealogy. In essence, I wish to argue that mainstream approaches to structuralism’s history need to be significantly broadened, not only to better account for the contributions of Eastern and Central European thinkers, but also to take into full consideration structuralism’s deep, complex and rich roots in 19th Century German thought. To make this point, I will succinctly compare three distinct historiographical models of structuralism (“French”, “East-West”, “Jakobsonian”), each of which provides a very rough and selective, yet highly contrastive map of the intellectual and personal networks that underpinned structuralism’s development up to World War II. Thanks to this basic comparative exercise, I hope to highlight the reductionistic, limiting nature of the first two models with regards to the more complete (if not exhaustive or definitive) third one and to cast further light on Jakobson’s crucial function as a communicator, synthesiser and passer of ideas between scholars, disciplines and intellectual traditions.