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MemberHilary Jane Locke

I’m a recent Masters graduate, living in Sydney. My Master of Philosophy degree focused on the presence of chivalry and courtly love in the courts of Henry VII and Henry VIII. And I wish to undertake a PhD, starting in 2019, exploring the relationship between historical fiction and the public’s perceptions of history.  I have taught courses on medieval and early modern religious history as well as revolutions in history. My research interests are Tudor England, medievalism, and historical popular culture and their depictions of the past.

MemberAdele Curness

My research interests lie in the textual and material culture of Byzantine and Norman Italy, particularly relating to questions of community structure and ethnic and religious identity on the imperial frontier with Islamic North Africa. My thesis focuses especially on synthesising the Arabic sources for Byzantine Italy with their Greek and Latin counterparts, and I aim to show that, through relationships between Italo-Greek Christians and different religious and ethnic communities, the westernmost Byzantine province of Calabria was deeply connected to the Fatimid world of North and sub-Saharan Africa, certainly more so than its connection to the imperial centre at Constantinople. In this vein, my MPhil thesis analysed the construction of authority in Calabrian hagiographic texts and Arabic documents from Tunisia, observing the ways in which the highly stylised portrayal of the ‘holy man’ revealed tensions in local society between Orthodoxy, loyalty to the imperial government, and the attractions of the Islamic world. My secondary interests are the reception and portrayal of the far south of Italy in modern Italian cultural discourse and the life of Matilda of Canossa. I am interested more broadly in Byzantine and Early Medieval history, hagiography, historical geography, numismatics, and cultural history. I am always keen to debate comparative questions on the history of religious pluralism and identity in frontier societies. Outside of my academic research, I am determined to improve the accessibility of Byzantine Studies to students and lay-readers alike. I am passionate about the translation of foreign-language sources into English, and work on this myself, and about challenging the underlying Eurocentric assumptions in medieval studies that lead to Byzantine history being relegated from medieval curricula. I would be delighted to be contacted by western medievalists wishing to work collaboratively on this matter. I am the president of the Oxford University Byzantine Society.

MemberAnna Dorofeeva

I’m Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow at the Friedrich Meineke Institute, Free University of Berlin. My research interests span the cultural and intellectual history of the early and high Middle Ages, with a particular focus on book history. My most recent research output has focused on the Physiologus, the codicology of miscellany manuscripts and medieval cryptography. I’m currently working on the interaction between Caroline and Visigothic minuscule scripts in early medieval Catalonia, cataloguing the palaeographical changes that are evidence of cultural exchange and migration of written practices. If you want to get in touch, drop me an email: dorofeeva [at] zedat.fu-berlin [dot] de.

MemberPaige Bryenton

Hello, my name is Paige Bryenton and I am a 4th year History major with a minor in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Carleton University. My educational interests surround  relationships and sexuality in the medieval era. I am also interested in the Roman Empire and 18th century Britain. In my fourth year, I am trying to narrow down what I would like to study and I would like to specialize in after my undergrad. I have narrowed my scope to the medieval era, specifically relationships and sexuality. I am taking a course called Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts which I think will help build my knowledge of this field and the possible careers that could be in store for someone with a History degree. Some hobbies I have include playing board games. Some favourites include Settlers of Catan, Lords of Waterdeep, and Mysterium. I also play Dungeons & Dragons and enjoy the fantasy culture surrounding that which ties into my love of history quite well.

MemberOlivia Richmond

I’m in my fourth year in History at Carleton. I moved to Ottawa three years ago from Kitchener, ON. This year, I am developing digital history skills by working with my classmates on digitizing Late Medieval folio pages and learning the mystic arts involved in digital codicology. My usual interests include medieval women, medieval Christianity and monasticism , disability studies, and sexuality and gender. This year I am working on an Honours research project, which will be a year long endeavour into late medieval convents, considering what images they were exposed to and how the cloister impacted the lives of the nuns living there.

MemberKatrin Boniface

Kat Boniface is a PhD student at the University of California, Riverside, studying horses and horsemanship in early modern Europe. She earned her MA in medieval history, with Distinction, from California State University, Fresno in 2015. Her Master’s thesis was on the social symbolism of the horse, and the disconnect from its practical value that developed in the late middle ages. She graduated from Stony Brook University, in New York, in 2013 with honors in history and a second major in English, both focusing on medieval Europe. She is the founder and current President of the Equine History Collective. Prior to returning to academics, she earned a trade degree in horse training from Meredith Manor International Equestrian Centre, along with a teaching certification, and ran an equine program in Maryland. Current research areas include medieval and early modern equine nutrition, changing definitions of “humane” treatment in animal training, and genetic history. Her dissertation, “Manufacturing the Horse,” examines how the heritability of traits in livestock was understood prior to Mendel and Darwin.

MemberJonathan Herold

My field of research is the study of pragmatic aspects of early medieval literate culture, particularly early record-keeping practices and modes of memorialization.  My doctoral thesis (Centre for Medieval Studies in the University of Toronto, 2008) is an analysis of the composition and preservation of Worcester Cathedral’s Conquest-era archive.  I currently teach undergraduate courses on the Vikings in European History and Culture (University of Trinity College of the University of Toronto), the History of Early and Later Medieval Europe and the History of Anglo-Saxon England (Glendon College of York University); I have also taught in the Department of History of Trent University-Oshawa.  I have contributed electronic text markup and data development for Professor A. P. M. Orchard’s “Mapping Anglo-Saxon Poetry Project” (University of Toronto) and pre-Conquest English charter data to Professor Michael Gervers’ DMC-DEEDS Project.

MemberKatherine Cross

I am a historian of the Early Middle Ages interested in ethnic identity, religious conversion, and comparative approaches. I have just published my first book, Heirs of the Vikings: History and Identity in Normandy and England, c. 950 – c. 1015 (YMP, 2018), and recently co-curated Imagining the Divine: Art and the Rise of World Religions at the Ashmolean Museum.