Search

MemberAndré Carrington

andré carrington is a scholar of race, gender, and genre in Black and American cultural production. He is the Beatrice Shepherd Blane Fellow in the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University (2018-2019) and Associate Professor of African American literature at Drexel University. His first book, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction (Minnesota, 2016) interrogates the cultural politics of race in the fantastic genres through studies of science fiction fanzines, comics, film and television, and other speculative fiction texts. He is currently at work on a second book-length research project, Audiofuturism, on the cultural politics of race in science fiction radio drama and literary adaptation in a transatlantic context. carrington’s writing appears in journals (American LiteratureSouls, and African & Black Diaspora), books (A Companion to the Harlem Renaissance, Black Gay Genius: Answering Joseph Beam’s Call), and blogs (Black Perspectives). He is also a contributor to the forthcoming collections Digital Pedagogies in the Humanities and After Queer Studies: Literary Theory and Critical Interpretation. With cartoonist Jennifer Camper, he co-founded the biennial Queers & Comics international conference in 2015. He teaches courses in African American and Global Black Literature, Literary Theory, Black Liberation Movements, LGBT Literature & Culture, Comics & Graphic Novels, and Science Fiction. He’s also a birder.

MemberSasha Senderovich

Sasha Senderovich’s research focuses on the figure of the Soviet Jew as a multifaceted, unstable cultural construct located at the intersection of Jewish and Russian/Soviet cultures, literatures, and cinema. He considers this process of formation in two distinct settings that represent the core foci of his two ongoing research projects. His first project focuses on Russian and Yiddish literary and cultural sources during the 1920s and the 1930s, while the second considers the intersection of Russian Jewish literature and American Jewish literature, in Russian and in English, during the Cold War and post-Soviet periods. Senderovich’s first project consists of a monograph How the Soviet Jew Was Made: Culture and Mobility After the Revolution (in progress, under advance contract with Harvard University Press); and two critical editions of translated literary texts and authorship of critical apparatus, including David Bergelson’s Judgment: A Novel, translated from the Yiddish in collaboration with Harriet Murav (Northwestern University Press, 2017). Senderovich’s second project, to date, consists of two peer-reviewed articles, including in Prooftexts, a top tier journal in comparative Jewish literary studies, as well as public scholarship in publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Forward, and The New Republic.

MemberSteve Mentz

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St. John’s University in New York City. His work explores Early Modern Literature, Ecocriticism, Shakespeare, and the Blue Humanities. Most recently he is the author of Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization 1550 – 1719 (U Minn P, 2015) and co-editor of The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture (Routledge, 2016). He is a Series Editor for Environmental Humanities in Premodern Culture (EHPC) for Amsterdam University Press.

MemberChristina Boyles

Christina Boyles is an Assistant Professor of Culturally-engaged Digital Humanities in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures. She is the founder of the Hurricane Memorial project and is the co-founder of the Makers by Mail project. Her research explores the relationship between surveillance, social justice, and the environment. Her published work appears in Digital Humanities Quarterly, Bodies of Information: Feminist Debates in the Digital Humanities, American Quarterly, Studies in American Indian Literatures, The Southern Literary Journal, The South Central Review, and Plath Profiles.

TopicCFA: 2019 Penn State Global Asias Summer Institute “Digital Asias"

Penn State University invites applicants for its annual Global Asias Summer Institute, to be held June 3-7, 2019. This year’s Institute, co-directed by Joseph Jonghyun Jeon (UC-Irvine) and Jonathan E. Abel (Penn State), focuses on the topic of “Digital Asias.” Institute participants spend a week reading and thinking about the annual theme, as well as […]

MemberJohn E. Drabinski

John E. Drabinski is Charles Hamilton Houston 1915 Professor of Black Studies in the Department of Black Studies at Amherst College. In addition to authoring four books, most recently Glissant and the Middle Passage: Philosophy, Beginning, Abyss (Minnesota, 2019) and Levinas and the Postcolonial: Race, Nation, Other (Edinburgh, 2012), he has written over three dozen articles on Africana theory and French philosophy, and has edited books and journal issues on Frantz Fanon, Jean-Luc Godard, Emmanuel Levinas, Édouard Glissant, and the question of political reconciliation. He is currently finalizing a translation and critical introduction to Jean Bernabé, Patrick Chamoiseau, and Raphael Confiant’s Éloge de la créolité, and is completing a book-length study of the philosophical dimensions of James Baldwin’s non-fiction entitled ‘So Unimaginable a Price’: Baldwin and the Black Atlantic.

MemberRuth-Ellen St. Onge

I was born and raised in rural Northern Ontario and lived in Toronto for several years before relocating to the United States in 2015 to join the curatorial staff at Rare Book School. During my graduate studies, I worked at the rare book library and research centre, Joseph Sablé Centre for 19th Century French Studies, and taught undergraduate FSL and French Cultural Studies courses in the Department of French at the University of Toronto. My interdisciplinary doctoral dissertation focused on publishers of poetry in 19th century France, with particular attention paid to the careers of Auguste Poulet-Malassis, Alphonse Lemerre, and Léon Vanier. My current research has shifted towards the study of contemporary graphic novels and comic book culture.