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MemberSasha Senderovich

Sasha Senderovich’s research focuses on the figure of the Soviet Jew as a multifaceted, unstable cultural construct located at the intersection of Jewish and Russian/Soviet cultures, literatures, and cinema. He considers this process of formation in two distinct settings that represent the core foci of his two ongoing research projects. His first project focuses on Russian and Yiddish literary and cultural sources during the 1920s and the 1930s, while the second considers the intersection of Russian Jewish literature and American Jewish literature, in Russian and in English, during the Cold War and post-Soviet periods. Senderovich’s first project consists of a monograph How the Soviet Jew Was Made: Culture and Mobility After the Revolution (in progress, under advance contract with Harvard University Press); and two critical editions of translated literary texts and authorship of critical apparatus, including David Bergelson’s Judgment: A Novel, translated from the Yiddish in collaboration with Harriet Murav (Northwestern University Press, 2017). Senderovich’s second project, to date, consists of two peer-reviewed articles, including in Prooftexts, a top tier journal in comparative Jewish literary studies, as well as public scholarship in publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Forward, and The New Republic.

MemberAndré Carrington

andré carrington is a scholar of race, gender, and genre in Black and American cultural production. He is the Beatrice Shepherd Blane Fellow in the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University (2018-2019) and Associate Professor of African American literature at Drexel University. His first book, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction (Minnesota, 2016) interrogates the cultural politics of race in the fantastic genres through studies of science fiction fanzines, comics, film and television, and other speculative fiction texts. He is currently at work on a second book-length research project, Audiofuturism, on the cultural politics of race in science fiction radio drama and literary adaptation in a transatlantic context. carrington’s writing appears in journals (American LiteratureSouls, and African & Black Diaspora), books (A Companion to the Harlem Renaissance, Black Gay Genius: Answering Joseph Beam’s Call), and blogs (Black Perspectives). He is also a contributor to the forthcoming collections Digital Pedagogies in the Humanities and After Queer Studies: Literary Theory and Critical Interpretation. With cartoonist Jennifer Camper, he co-founded the biennial Queers & Comics international conference in 2015. He teaches courses in African American and Global Black Literature, Literary Theory, Black Liberation Movements, LGBT Literature & Culture, Comics & Graphic Novels, and Science Fiction. He’s also a birder.

TopicCFA: 2019 Penn State Global Asias Summer Institute “Digital Asias"

Penn State University invites applicants for its annual Global Asias Summer Institute, to be held June 3-7, 2019. This year’s Institute, co-directed by Joseph Jonghyun Jeon (UC-Irvine) and Jonathan E. Abel (Penn State), focuses on the topic of “Digital Asias.” Institute participants spend a week reading and thinking about the annual theme, as well as […]

MemberSteve Mentz

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St. John’s University in New York City. His work explores Early Modern Literature, Ecocriticism, Shakespeare, and the Blue Humanities. Most recently he is the author of Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization 1550 – 1719 (U Minn P, 2015) and co-editor of The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture (Routledge, 2016). He is a Series Editor for Environmental Humanities in Premodern Culture (EHPC) for Amsterdam University Press.

MemberChristina Boyles

Christina Boyles is an Assistant Professor of Culturally-engaged Digital Humanities in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures. She is the founder of the Hurricane Memorial project and is the co-founder of the Makers by Mail project. Her research explores the relationship between surveillance, social justice, and the environment. Her published work appears in Digital Humanities Quarterly, Bodies of Information: Feminist Debates in the Digital Humanities, American Quarterly, Studies in American Indian Literatures, The Southern Literary Journal, The South Central Review, and Plath Profiles.

MemberAimi Hamraie

The cover image above shows a black and white sketch drawing of a building exterior, a “proposal for ramped entry” to a court house building in North Carolina drawn by disabled architect Ronald Mace in 1980. The building’s entry has two steps to its glass doors, but a ramp to the side facilitates entry to the same doors by wheels. Two people stand in apparent conversation in front of the doors, their bodies arranged in similar manner to the building’s vertical geometries: columns flanking the doors, as well as serving as aesthetic elements at the upper level. This design was unbuilt. Like the sketch, my work focuses on the relationship between bodies and built environments. I am assistant professor of Medicine, Health, & Society, affiliated faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies, and director of the Mapping Access project and Critical Design Lab at Vanderbilt University. My interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on the historical and ethnographic study of bodies and built environments, applying frameworks from critical and crip disability studies, feminist technoscience studies, and critical design studies. My first book, Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability, studied the twentieth century shift from design for the average user to design for non-average users culminating in the movement toward Universal Design. My second book project, Enlivened City: public bodies, healthy spaces, livable worlds, examines the biopolitics of global livable cities design. I also direct Mapping Access, a participatory data collection and mapping project focused on promoting accessibility in built environments. Finally, I am a certified permaculture designer working at the intersections of food justice, sustainability, and urban development.