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MemberChristine Yao

Christine “Xine” Yao is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia in the Department of English. She works on intersections of affect, race, gender, and sexuality in relation to science and law through long 19th century American literature. Her research has been published in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists and American Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion. She is an award-winning instructor of literature, culture, and writing. She completed her Ph.D.  in English at Cornell University in 2016 with minors in American Studies and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Dr. Yao’s postdoctoral, PhD, and MA work has been funded by competitive national grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her archival research has been supported by travel grants to the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the College of the Library of Physicians of Philadelphia. Additional training thanks to the Center for American Visual Culture, the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth College, and the LGBT Leadership Academy at Cornell in Washington. For further information and CV, please see http://www.christineyao.com 

MemberErvin Malakaj

I am Assistant Professor of German Studies at the University of British Columbia. Prior to my appointment at UBC, I served as Assistant Professor of German and Coordinator of the German Program at Sam Houston State University. I received my Ph.D. in Germanic Languages and Literatures and Film & Media Studies at Washington University in St. Louis (2015) and hold a B.A. (2007) and M.A. (2009) in German Studies from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

I specialize in late-18th to 21st-century German media and cultural history. In particular, my research focuses on 19th-century literary cultures, film history (Imperial Germany, Weimar Germany, cinema of the 60s and 70s), narrative theory, queer theory, and critical pedagogy.

Currently, I am writing a book examining the influence of fluctuating literary markets on authorial agency and narrative form provisionally titled Fragile Literary Cultures in Early Imperial Germany. Part and parcel of this research is my work on a volume titled The Becoming and Afterlife of Literature: Agents in the German Literary Field (co-edited with Vance Byrd).

My scholarship in film studies includes a book project examining the primacy of melodramatic form in the articulation of queer experiences in popular culture and the intellectual sphere of Weimar Germany. In addition, I am completing an article, which examines the queer potential of slapstick in Ernst Lubitsch’s early comedies. This article is part of my work on an edited volume titled An Interdisciplinary Companion to Slapstick Cultures (co-edited with Alena Lyons and under advanced contract with de Gruyter).

In 2016, I co-founded the international scholarly collective “Diversity, Decolonialization, and the German Curriculum” (DDGC). Following DDGC’s inaugural conference March 2017 at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, DDGC has been institutionalized into a biannual conference (the next conference will take place Spring 2019 at St. Olaf College). I also serve as the co-editor of DDGC’s official blog.

MemberLisa Quinn

Lisa Quinn is the Director of Wilfrid Laurier University Press, in Waterloo, Ontario, where she previously built a decade of experience as an acquisitions editor. She has lectured in the graduate LIS program in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario on media theory, publishing, and the organization of information. She is currently past president of the Association of Canadian University Presses, a member of the board of directors of the Ontario Book Publisher’s Organization and Livres Canada Books. 

MemberAllison Neal

Victorianist and Neo-Victorianist interested in Victorian Literature, History, Culture and Heritage; Contemporary literature and culture, and particularly its recent negotiations with the Victorian era through neo-Victorian appropriations of the long nineteenth century; the (de)construction of identities and societal roles, adaptation theory, paratexts and their transformations; the relationship between the classes in the past and present as depicted in literature, on film and television, along with Victorian and neo-Victorian pastiche, parody, and satire. My approach to research is interdisciplinary in nature and involves drawing on critical literary analysis, historical evidence, and postmodern theories of interpretation. And I have a cat called Victoria.

MemberEugenia Zuroski

Eugenia Zuroski has been a member of the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University since 2009. Gena is author of the book A Taste for China: English Subjectivity and the Prehistory of Orientalism (Oxford University Press, 2013), which argues that chinoiserie played an integral role in the formation of modern English subjectivity. Tracing a shift in the relationship between English selves and “things Chinese” from the Restoration through the early nineteenth century, this study shows how both orientalism and privatized subjectivity take shape through cultural processes of disavowing earlier ideals, including cosmopolitanism and aristocratic power. Gena has published articles in Novel: A Forum on Fiction, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Journal18. In addition to teaching courses in literatures and cultures of the long eighteenth century, she teaches introductory level undergraduate courses in short fiction and poetry and one of the core courses in the graduate Cultural Studies and Critical Theory (CSCT) program, “Foundations in CSCT.” In addition to her teaching and research, Gena serves as editor of Eighteenth-Century Fiction, winner of the 2017 CELJ Voyager Award. She has edited special issues of ECF on “Exoticism & Cosmopolitanism” (Fall 2012) and “The Senses of Humour” (Summer 2014). Most recently, she co-edited a 2-part special issue of ECF on “Material Fictions” with Michael Yonan (Dept. of Art History and Archaeology, U of Missouri), published in late 2018 and early 2019. The recipient of a SSHRC Insight Grant, Gena is currently completing a book which argues for the emergence of politically relevant forms of “funniness” in eighteenth-century literature, aesthetics, and subjectivity.  She has been invited to present portions of this project at the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities 18th/19th-Century Colloquium at Vanderbilt University; the Columbia University Seminar in Eighteenth-Century European Culture; the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies Research Seminar at the University of York, UK; the University of East Anglia Research Seminar; and in keynotes for the British Women Writer’s Conference and the David Nichol Smith Seminar. Gena serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Society of Learned Journals, the Executive Board of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Editorial Board of Scholarly and Research Communication, and the Advisory Board of the Hamilton Review of Books. She is currently the faculty co-chair of McMaster’s President’s Advisory Committee on Building an Inclusive Community (PACBIC), and an organizing member of the #BIPOC18 and #Bigger6 collectives. Her first chapbook of poetry, Hovering, Seen, was published by Anstruther Press in 2019.

MemberBen Carver

Ben Carver teaches academic writing at the European University Institute in Florence. He writes about speculative fiction, and his recent book (Palgrave) on alternate history in nineteenth-century thought and writing has been described by Fredric Jameson as a “stimulating history of plural virtualities that demonstrates how poetic our prosaic 19th century was in fact, and how productively it confronted its own unrealized possibilities.” He is now co-editing a volume on Literary Form and Conspiracy Culture and working on various related projects.

MemberJohn Mcaleer

I am a historian of the British Empire. My work focuses on the British encounter and engagement with the wider world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, situating the history of empire in its global and maritime contexts. I am interested in the relationships, interactions and patterns of exchange created by the British Empire, and in assessing the impact of these experiences on both British and colonial societies. Before joining the University of Southampton, I was Curator of Imperial and Maritime History at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. During my time at the museum, I worked on the development and delivery of two gallery projects, focusing on Atlantic and Indian Ocean history respectively. I continue to be interested in the role of material culture and museums in representing the history of empire.

MemberCarlo Rindi Nuzzolo

I obtained my PhD degree in Egyptology at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) after completing my studies at the University of Florence and the University of Pisa. I currently work as Lead Curator of the Circulating Artefacts project at the British Museum (Department of Egypt and Sudan). The project aims to create a cross-platform alliance against the looting of pharaonic antiquities. My PhD research investigated the Graeco-Roman cartonnage manufacture (i.e. mummy masks, foot-cases, full body covers) at Ismant al-Kharab, ancient Kellis, in the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt, and identified local traits and features in the decoration, as an expression of the regional tradition. The survey and the comparison of archaeological data with the antiquities market raised issues of cultural heritage preservation and protection by establishing that a number of tombs at Kellis were looted in recent times. From 2008, I founded two research projects with the main purpose of retracing funerary artefacts in museums and private collections and documentation in libraries and archives about the Nizzoli family from the 19th century, who contributed to the creation of four Egyptian collections in Europe. I have a keen interest in Cultural Heritage, material culture, burial customs, local variations, and Digital Humanities. I am a member of the Dakhleh Oasis Project, and in 2018 I was part of the organisation of the International Conference for the 40th anniversary of the DOP.

MemberNga Bellis-Phan

Nga Bellis-Phan is a Legal Historian specialized in European Early modern Private law and Economic history (16th-19th century). After graduating from law school with a full scholarship from the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, she is now a funded PhD candidate at the Institute of Legal History – University Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas. She has been a visiting researcher to the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History (Frankfurt, Germany) in 2017 and a full-time teaching assistant in Legal History at University Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas (2014-2016) and University Paris-Nanterre (2017-2019). Her doctoral project, The theoretical and practical Legal History of Pawnbroking, from the 16th century to the 1804 French Civil Code, looks into credit networks and material culture in different social classes of Early Modern France, but also more broadly on the progressive implementation of legal regulations in a growing State to ensure legal security for both creditors and debtors, and to protect the most precarious against fatalities of usury. Since 2015, Nga is also actively involved with MarineLives, a London-based historical research project on 17th century manuscripts of the English High Court of Admiralty using Digital Humanities tools. She presented with Colin Greenstreet some aspects of the project at the DH Benelux 2018 Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands. In 2018, she became a trustee of Chronoscopic Education, which serves as the legal basis for MarineLives and its sister projects – Maphackathon, Sign of Literacy and others. Academic interests > European Legal History & Economic History (16th-19th century) Pawnbroking, Credit networks, Movable assets, Securities for debts > Digital Humanities Handwritten text automated recognition, Network analysis, Historical Mapping/GIS Full up-to-date CV (in French, July 2020): here. Contact me at: nga.bellis[at]yahoo.fr

MemberKatherine D. Harris

Katherine D. Harris, a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative LiteratureSan José State University, specializes in Romantic-Era and 19th-century British literature, women’s authorship, the literary annual, 19th-century history print culture and history of the book, textuality, editorial theory, Digital Humanities, and Digital Pedagogy. Her work ranges from pedagogical articles on using digital tools in the classroom to traditional scholarship on a “popular” literary form in 19th-century England. She chronicled her teaching adventures in the March 2011 blog, A Day in the Life of Digital Humanities, along with 200 other participants which turned into a plenary address for the 2012 Re: Humanities and an article about the successes and failures of teaching with digital tools, “TechnoRomanticism: Creating Digital Editions in an Undergraduate Classroom” (Journal of Victorian Culture April 2011). Because of this work, Harris was named to the Council on Digital Humanities for the National Institute of Technology in Liberal Education and  co-taught a week-long seminar in Digital Pedagogy at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria. In January 2012, she represented Digital Pedagogy as a panelist at the DHCommons pre-conference workshop, “Getting Started in Digital Humanities,” at the 2012 Modern Language Association ConventionHarris wrote about her pedagogical adventures over at FairMatter.com, a blog hosted by W.W. Norton Publishers. Her most recent article on digital pedagogy was published in Fall 2013 for Polymath. The latest experiment, along with co-editors Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, and Jentery Sayers, involves open peer review, GitHub, and establishing a digital pedagogy collection of teaching materials, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities along with the Modern Language Association. In keeping with her work in Digital Humanities, Harris chaired the California Open Educational Resources Council, a state-funded initiative to promote adoption of open educational resources textbooks in the University of California, California State University, and California Community College segments (113 campuses). After 3 years of state-funded work, that initiative has been converted to a program supporting adoption of OER materials on individual campuses throughout the CCC and CSU (AB 798 [Bonilla 2015]). The Council’s work culminated in a series of helpful OER resources:

Council members, including Harris, continue to submit journal articles to publicize their findings — the latest published article by Hanley & Bonilla presents initial findings based on surveys, focus groups, and a pilot project conducted on CCC, CSU, and UC faculty and students as well as the infrastructure of the CA-OER Council. In her scholarly adventures, Harris’ research on 19th-century British literary annuals resulted in a literary history of annuals: Forget Me Not: The Rise of the British Literary Annual (1823-1835) (Ohio UP, 2015), a monograph based on her articles, “Feminizing the Textual Body: Women and their Literary Annuals in Nineteenth-Century Britain” (Publications of the Bibliographical Society of America 99:4) and “Borrowing, Altering and Perfecting the Literary Annual Form – or What It is Not: Emblems, Almanacs, Pocket-books, Albums, Scrapbooks and Gifts Books” (Poetess Archive Journal 1:1). She created a legacy scholarly edition for the study of literary annuals, The Forget Me Not: A Hypertextual Archive, most of which has been re-coded into TEI and incorporated into the Poetess Archive Database edited by Professor Laura Mandell. Harris’ edited collection of Gothic short stories from the 1820s’ most popular annuals, with Zittaw Press (2012) was part of her plenary address at the Gothic Fiction Studies Conference in March 2012. Two talks that were offered during Spring 2014 at universities in New Zealand addressed some of the more interesting findings about the publishers, printers, and engravers in the business of literary annuals. In January 2013, she returned to her textual studies foundation with her presentation, “Echoes at Our Peril: Small Feminist Archives in Big Digital Humanities” at the 2013 Modern Language Convention in Boston, a talk originally given in October 2012, Scripps College as part of their Humanities Institute lecture series. In February 2013, Harris spoke at the Mellon-funded Digital Humanities Colloquium, Austin College. In Spring 2014, she returned to the road with  a talk focusing on the work of David C. Greetham at The Graduate Center, City University of New York being published in Textual Cultures 9.1 (2015). In Fall 2014, the travel continued with an invited talk on collaboration at the University of Alabama’s Digital Humanities Center and another on “archive” at the University of Tulsa, and then an appearance at the Modern Language Association Convention 2016 in Austin to co-preside over a digital pedagogy poster session. As of Fall 2019, her promotion to Full Professor and ensuing sabbatical have offered an opportunity to dig deeply into the intellectual representations of British Romanticism to continue to investigate moving beyond the Big 6 of this literary period. Her current project combines her work on SJSU’s “Deep Humanities” endeavors to conjoin Humanities and STEM curriculum on campus as well as continuing the commitment to publish in open access journals. She has spent the last few years on community-building through the Humanities, especially with her talk to the both the Book Club of California and the San Jose Museum of Art. To see her most recent and upcoming talks as well as the accompanying slides, check this page. For a full list of courses, syllabi, assignments, calendar, office hours, contact information, see Harris’ teaching page.