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MemberKaren Grumberg

Karen Grumberg is Associate Professor in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies and the Program in Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at Austin, where she also serves as Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. She is the author of Space and Place in Contemporary Hebrew Literature (Syracuse UP, 2011). Her second book, Hebrew Gothic: History and the Poetics of Persecution, is currently under review.

MemberSean Hannan

Sean Hannan (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 2016) is an Assistant Professor in the Humanities at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. His research focuses on the intellectual history of Christianity, with emphases on late antiquity, North Africa, and the philosophy of time. While his doctoral project dealt with temporality in the works of Augustine of Hippo, his current research broadens out to incorporate alternative accounts of time drawn from antiquity and the Middle Ages. At MacEwan, he has a mandate to make use of methods from the digital humanities when teaching courses on ancient, medieval, and early modern history.

MemberThomas J. Nelson

I am a Research Fellow in Classics at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. My research focuses on the poetics and politics of Greek poetry from the archaic period to the Hellenistic world. I’m currently writing a book on the ‘pre-Alexandrian footnote’ and other markers of intertextuality in archaic and classical Greek literature. I explore how the earliest known Greek poets self-consciously acknowledged the familiarity of their subject matter and signalled their references to tradition – placing markers in their works for alert audiences to recognise. This kind of signposting is often considered the preserve of later literary cultures, closely linked with the development of libraries, literacy and writing. But I argue that these same devices were already deeply engrained in our earliest oral archaic Greek poetry. My other major research interest lies in the field of Hellenistic poetry, where I’m especially interested in the fragments and traces of poetic traditions beyond Ptolemaic Alexandria. In particular, I’m currently studying Attalid and Seleucid poetic traditions, as well as Hellenistic epic fragments more generally. As a student, I completed my PhD at Trinity College, Cambridge, supervised by Professor Richard Hunter; before that, I studied at the University of Oxford, completing both my BA and MSt at University College. I’ve co-organised a number of conferences, including ‘Hellenistic Poetry Beyond Callimachean Aesthetics’ (September 2016), the Cambridge AHRC DTP’s Conference on Time and Temporality (September 2016), and the Cambridge Laurence Seminar on Collaboration and Ancient Literature (June 2020). For the 2019 CA/FIEC conference, I also organised a panel entitled ‘Poetics Between Greece and the Near East’ (July 2019). Teaching materials for my undergraduates is available at http://www.thomas-j-nelson.co.uk/teaching.html. I’m very open to any kind of collaborative research and happy to be contacted about any ideas for collaboration, however preliminary.

MemberAnne Fuchs

Anne Fuchs studied German and English Literature at the University of Konstanz, Trinity College Dublin and the Freie Universität Berlin. Her PhD examined the role of humour in the works of the Swiss writer Robert Walser. Between ‌1992-2010 she was Lecturer, Senior Lecturer and then Professor of Modern German Literature and Culture at University College Dublin where she co-founded the UCD Humanities Institute in 2002, funded by the Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions in Ireland (PRTLI 3). From 2002 – 2007 she was Principal Investigator of the five-year Research Programme “German Memory Contests since 1945”, funded by PRTLI3. In 2005/6 she received an IRCHSS Senior Research Fellowship, which enabled her to carry out research for her fourth monograph Phantoms of War in Contemporary German Literature, Films and Discourse. The award of a UCD Senior Fellowship in 2010 helped her to complete her research on After the Dresden Bombing: Pathways of Memory, 1945 to the Present. In 2011 she accepted the Chair and Professorship of German at the University of St Andrews before moving to Warwick in January 2012. She was a Fellow of the Max Planck research group Memory and History, University of Constance and guest researcher at the Kulturwissenschaftliche Kolleg, Universität Konstanz in 2014. She returned to UCD in September 2016 to assume the Directorship of the UCD Humanities Institute. She is a Member of the Royal Irish Academy and in 2014 she was elected a Fellow of the British Academy.Research interests
Memory studies (in particular German politics of memory since 1945); German literature in the 20th and 21st centuries; German-Jewish literature; Modernism; the cultural history of walking; time and temporality in the digital era.Her current research concerns the experience of historical acceleration at the beginning of the 21 century. The inability to determine the speed of social and economic developments through conventional legislation and planning in western democracy was underlined by the events in the wake of the financial crash of 2008. Indeed, the premium placed on speed and the constant drive towards innovation raise the question of how cultural connectedness to places and traditions can be assured under such radically new conditions. She was co-organiser (with Jonathan Long, Durham University) of an international conference on Faster than Light? Historical Experience, Placed Identity and Memory in the Age of Historical Acceleration which was held at the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Warwick from 7 – 9 March 2012. And The Longing for Time: Ästhetische Eigenzeit in Contemporary German Literature, Film and Art, held at the Kulturiwssenschaftliche Kolleg, Universität Konstanz , 15-17 May 2014 in collaboration with Prof. Aleida Assmann.