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MemberAndrew Newman

Originally from Queens, NY, I’ve been teaching at Stony Brook since 2005. I’m the author of Allegories of Encounter: Colonial Literacy and Indian Captivities (2019) and On Records: Delaware Indians, Colonists, and the Media of History and Memory (2012). As a 2019 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, I’m working on a cultural history of high school English, The High School Canon: Literature and American Life, from the Cold War to the Common Core. Please contact me at andrew.newman@stonybrook.edu.

MemberCaroline Wilkinson

I received my MFA at Washington University in Saint Louis and my Ph.D. in English, with Creative-Writing dissertation, at University of Tennessee where I am a post-doctoral lecturer. I study poetics and the Victorian Novel with an emphasis on place, the environment, and labor. My articles have appeared in Dickens Studies Annual and George Eliot-George Henry Lewes Studies. My fiction and poetry explore the rural landscape and labor, subjects I see as underrepresented in contemporary writing. My current novel project, Present Blusters, explores the hidden past of the Hudson Valley through the story of a woman who, after getting Lyme disease, sees ghosts on the rundown estate where she lives. One chapter is forthcoming in Witness, while another has appeared in cream city review as the winner of the A. David Schwartz Fiction Prize.

MemberKaren Cook

I am assistant professor of music history at the Hartt School of Music, Dance, and Theater at the University of Hartford in West Hartford, Connecticut. My main areas of focus are on late medieval notation, theory, and performance; medievalism; and contemporary pop music, jazz, and music in media such as film, television, and video games. Additionally, I am an active singer, performer, and conductor of both early and contemporary music.

MemberFrancisco Barrón

Doctorante en Filosofía por la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la UNAM. Ha participado en varios proyectos de investigación como: “Memoria y Escritura”, “Políticas de la memoria”, “La cuestión del sujeto en el relato”, “Diccionario para el debate: Alteridades y exclusiones”, “Estrategias contemporáneas de lectura de la Antigüedad grecorromana” y “Herramientas digitales para la investigación en humanidades”. Se ha dedicado al estudio del pensamiento griego antiguo, francés contemporáneo y de los filósofos alemanes Friedrich Nietzsche y Walter Benjamin. Sus intereses son las relaciones entre la estética y la política, y los problemas especulativos sobre la relación entre la técnica, el arte, el lenguaje y el cuerpo. Miembro del comité ejecutivo de la Red de humanistas digitales.

MemberJordan Rosenblum

My research focuses on the literature, law, and social history of the rabbinic movement. In particular, I am interested in how rabbinic food regulations enact and maintain distinct identities. I am currently writing a book entitled Rabbinic Drinking: What Beverages Teach Us About Rabbinic Literature (University of California Press; forthcoming in February 2020) and co-editing a volume entitled Feasting and Fasting: The History and Ethics of Jewish Food (New York University Press; forthcoming in December 2019).

MemberAlmas Khan

As an intellectual historian, I analyze how modernism in American law and literature has shaped the quest for equal citizenship. Drawing on my Ph.D. in English and my J.D. with a focus on constitutional history, I interrogate how creative forms of legal dissent – ranging from judicial opinions to lyric poems – have sparked constitutional reimagination in the context of African American, working-class, and women’s experiences. My current book project, An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship, construes legal realism (a progenitor of critical race theory) and literary realism as a major post-Civil War movements connecting disciplinary critiques to equitist politics. I have additional interests in British literary modernism and postcolonial studies, having composed articles on Joseph Conrad’s and Virginia Woolf’s texts. My literary and legal scholarship has been published in several anthologies and journals, including Critical Insights: Social Justice and American Literature; Critical Insights: Inequality; Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History; the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry; and the Chicago Journal of International Law. Forthcoming articles include “Black Lives Matter and Legal Reconstructions of Elegiac Forms” and “Applied Legal Storytelling: Toward a Stylistics of Embodiment.” I have also published widely on writing studies pedagogy through the lens of critical theory, drawing on extensive experiences teaching literature, law, and composition. My pedagogical scholarship has appeared in the Washburn Law JournalPerspectives: Teaching Legal Research & WritingThe Law Teacher, and the anthology Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t. When not immersed in literature, law, history, and philosophy, I explore modernist-inflected alternative music, fashion, interior design, landscapes, gardens, and other aesthetic phenomena suiting my fancy.

MemberMartine van Elk

Martine van Elk is a Professor of English at California State University, Long Beach. Her research interests include early modern women, early modern drama, Shakespeare, and the history of vagrancy. She has written articles on these subjects and most recently published a book on early modern Dutch and English women writers. She also runs a blog on early modern women.

MemberStephanie J. Lahey

Stephanie J. Lahey is a SSHRC-funded PhD candidate at the University of Victoria, Canada, where she holds the Howard E. Petch Research Scholarship and a University of Victoria Fellowship. Her doctoral dissertation—a mixed-methodology, corpus-based study of the use of parchment ‘offcuts’ (low-quality byproducts of parchment manufacturing) in manuscripts produced in later medieval England—is jointly supervised by Dr. Iain Macleod Higgins (Victoria) and Dr. Erik Kwakkel (UBC iSchool). A recent Guest Researcher at Universiteit Leiden, she is the Editorial Assistant of Early Middle English, teaches at DHSI and at the University of Victoria, and serves on the Public Relations and Outreach Committee of the Canadian Society of Medievalists / Société canadienne des médiévistes. Her research interests include medieval codicology, palaeography, and manuscript production; parchment-manufacturing and use; medieval legal, technical, and reference literatures; quantitative and digital humanities; and public humanities.