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MemberJacquelyn Clements

I recently completed a project as a Metadata Assistant at the Getty Research Institute, where I worked on digital projects related to the Getty Provenance Index (GPI) remodel. This includes the standardization and reconciliation of data from the GPI as we transitioned to a Linked Open Data model, virtually uniting millions of records pertinent to the study of the history of collecting, provenance, and the art market. Through data cleaning and management, I helped facilitate art historical research both now and for the future. My most recent project assisted in the production and publication of data related to the German Sales II Project (1900-1929). My academic interests range from the topography, sculpture, and vase painting of Classical Greece – I wrote my dissertation on Athenian autochthony and identity during the Peloponnesian War – to research pertaining to the provenance of Greek and Roman antiquities and the history of travel, collecting, and display of works of ancient art. I have also recently taught an online course on Provenance Research for Johns Hopkins University’s Masters in Museum Studies program.

MemberAndrew Tobolowsky

I study the Hebrew Bible, so far, primarily as someone interested in how it presents the history of ancient Israel, and how this vision may have been constructed. My work has often drawn, and I suspect often will draw, on comparisons from the study of Greek myth in order to interrogate existing models. So, for example, in my first book, the Sons of Jacob and the Sons of Herakles, I argued that the resemblance between the genealogical tradition that made Jacob the father of the twelve eponymous ancestors of Israel and Greek traditions about Hellen, the Panhellenic ancestor, and Herakles, suggests something quite different than most studies of biblical tribal discourse presume. Rather than efforts to preserve a very distant past, biblical tribal lists and descriptions may be, as they are in Greek myth, the medium through which later efforts to redescribe and redeploy that past were advanced. I have also published on the books of Samuel and Judges, and on comparisons with Ugaritic myth.

MemberSharmishtha Roy Chowdhury

I am interested in the connections between digital technology and the communication of historical knowledge. The digitizing, cataloging, and archiving of vast amounts of historical texts has transformed the way we research and produce writing about history. The only way to find out which direction we are headed in is by jumping into the fray and experimenting with the vast array of (changing) digital tools and platforms for communicating research in history. Student creativity in digital projects is a joy to behold.

MemberTravis Proctor

I am an Assistant Professor of Religion at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio. I teach courses in Christian Origins & History, Religion & Gender, Religion & Nature, and the interrelated histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. My current research explores early Christian theorizations of nonhuman bodies – particularly those of evil “demons” – and how such conceptualizations impacted the construction and ritual performance of the early Christian body. My other research interests include topics in gender/sexuality studies, ecocriticism, posthumanism, and ritual studies.