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MemberMartine van Elk

Martine van Elk is a Professor of English at California State University, Long Beach. Her research interests include early modern women, early modern drama, Shakespeare, and the history of vagrancy. She has written articles on these subjects and most recently published a book on early modern Dutch and English women writers. She also runs a blog on early modern women.

MemberHamish Cameron

In keeping with his research and teaching interests, Hamish Cameron is an itinerant historian hailing from a far-flung colony of a former empire. Thematically, he studies movement, borderlands, networks, geography and imperialism. Geographically, he explores the Eastern Mediterranean, Southwest Asia/the Near East and Rome. Chronologically, he investigates the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Philologically, he enjoys cultural allusions and tricola. No, tetracola… Wait, I’ll come in again… Hamish received his PhD in Classics from the University of Southern California in 2014 where he wrote a dissertation examining the representation of “Mesopotamia” as a borderland in Imperial Roman geographic writing of the first four centuries CE. His monograph on the subject has now been published: Making Mesopotamia: Geography and Empire in a Romano-Iranian Borderland (Brill 2019). He received his MA from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand in 2006 with a thesis on the arrival of Roman power in Cilicia. He also holds a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Science and Technology (2011) from the USC Spatial Sciences Institute. He has participated in two survey seasons in Greece and in specialist conferences on digital geography, borderlands, networks, religion, and Cilicia. Hamish has taught classes in History and Classical Languages dealing with topics from the Bronze Age to the Information Age. He is interested in the applied methodologies of digital humanities, especially digital geography, the digital dissemination of academic information, and the pedagogy of tabletop games. He also designs boardgames and roleplaying games.

MemberClaus Tieber

…s Sehen, Yash Raj Films in: Wulff, Hans Jürgen (Hg.): Lexikon der Filmbegriffe. Online: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de (22.10.2012)

 

Contributions to Discussions about Education Policy

Von Ketten- und anderen Verträgen: Zur Lage der Hochschullehrenden in Österreich (gemeinsam mit Thomas Schmidinger), in: Österreichische HochschülerInnensch…

Principle investigator of several research projects. Habilitation (post-doc thesis) about the history of the American screenplay (Schreiben für Hollywood. Das Drehbuch im Studiosystem. Münster et al: Lit Verlag 2008), Publications about storytelling in silent cinema (Stummfilmdramaturgie. Erzählweisen des amerikanischen Feature Films 1917 – 1927. Münster et al: Lit Verlag 2011), Hindi cinema and filmmusic. Teaches film studies at universities in Vienna, Brno, Kiel and Salamanca

MemberRoss Wilson

Dr Ross Wilson is a Senior Lecturer in the History department at the University of Chichester. He holds a BA (Hons) in Archaeology, an MA by Research in Archaeology and History (York, 2004) and a PhD in Archaeology and History (York, 2008). His doctoral thesis examined the experience of British soldiers on the Western Front and the representation of this experience within contemporary politics, media and culture. My research background is varied, taking approaches from archaeology, anthropology, literature and sociology to examine aspects of modern history and its representation in the present. I have research interests in modern British history and the history of the United States and I have written widely on issues of conflict, consumerism, identity, enslavement, literature, museums, heritage, urbanism, landscapes and material culture. In 2012, Routledge published my first book, Landscapes of the Western Front: Materiality during the Great War, which provided an anthropologically-informed examination of the British soldiers on the battlefields of France and Flanders during the First World War. This work then developed into an assessment of how the Great War (1914-1918) is valued and used across contemporary British society. This analysis of cultural history and heritage assesses how individuals and communities use the memory of the conflict to understand current political and social contexts. This work, Cultural Heritage of the Great War in Britain, was published by Routledge in July 2013. I continued my examination of the experience of the First World War with the 2014 publication with Routledge, New York and the First World War: shaping an American city. This work examined how the conflict of 1914-1918 had a dramatic effect on the citizens of New York, ensuring that a city of immigrants, which was perceived as a potential threat within the wider United States, was reformed during the war as a metropolis which was dedicated to the principles of the nation. In 2016, I published The Language of the Past with Bloomsbury. This study examined how we use references to the past to establish ideas and values in the present. From dinosaurs, cavemen, Egyptian pharaohs, Roman Emperors, medieval feudalism, Victorian culture and the Wild West, we incorporate the past as a metaphor, allusion or simile to guide us towards the future within contemporary society. I have developed my work within heritage studies and modern history with a book with Routledge in 2017, Natural History: heritage, place and politics. This assessed how the representation of natural history in museums, heritage sites, the media and within popular discourse, can be used to address how we relate to and understand our environment. In conjunction with this research, I have also been involved with the 1807 Commemorated project at the University of York which provided one of the major assessments of the marking of the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in British museums in 2007. This work was published by Routledge in 2011 as Representing Enslavement and Abolition in Museums: Ambiguous Engagements. My current research examines the history and heritage of health and safety, the media representation and memory of the First World War, the history of New York, the role of ‘natural heritage’, digital heritage, memory studies and the role of museums and heritage sites as a mode of social and political reform.

MemberJoel Neville Anderson

Joel Neville Anderson is a PhD Candidate in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester, where he received the Dean’s Dissertation Fellowship. His research is focused on the institutional mediation of personal documentary in the neoliberal era, working in experimental film and video, community media, environmental justice, film festival studies, and Japanese cinema. Anderson’s writing has appeared in scholarly journals, anthologies, and magazines including Millennium Film Journal, Studies in Documentary Film, International Feminist Journal of Politics, Afterimage: The Journal of Media Arts and Cultural Criticism, Hyperallergic, Senses of Cinema, and Film on the Faultline. He has taught theory, history, and production courses at the New School, SUNY Purchase College, and the University of Rochester, as well as workshops at the Museum of the Moving Image, Jacob Burns Film Center, and Downtown Community Television Center. He curates JAPAN CUTS: Festival of New Japanese Film, the largest festival of contemporary Japanese cinema in North America at Japan Society, New York since 2013, and formerly programmed the avant-garde film series On Film in Rochester. He produces the Society for Cinema and Media Studies podcast Aca-Media, and previously served as managing editor and editorial board member of InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture. He is based in Jamaica, Queens.