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MemberCaroline Edwards

20th and 21st Century Literature Science Fiction, Utopian Literature, Utopian Studies Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School Philosophy of Time Environmental Humanities, Petrocultures, Energy Humanities Open Access Publishing Dr Caroline Edwards is Senior Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature in the Department of English & Humanities at Birkbeck, University of London, where she is actively involved with Birkbeck’s Centre for Contemporary Literature. Her research focuses on the utopian imagination in contemporary literature, science fiction, apocalyptic narratives, and Western Marxism. She is author of Utopia and the Contemporary British Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2019), which examines temporal experience and utopian anticipation in contemporary texts by British writers including Hari Kunzru, Maggie Gee, David Mitchell, Ali Smith, Jim Crace, Joanna Kavenna, Grace McCleen, Jon McGregor and Claire Fuller. Her work on contemporary writers has also led to two co-edited books: China Miéville: Critical Essays, co-edited with Tony Venezia (Gylphi, 2015) and Maggie Gee: Critical Essays, co-edited with Sarah Dillon (Gylphi, 2015). Caroline is currently working on her second monograph, Arcadian Revenge: Utopia, Apocalypse and Science Fiction in the Era of Ecocatastrophe, which considers how fictions of extreme environments (such as Mars, Antarctica, the deep sea, and the centre of the Earth) have allowed writers to imagine creative responses to real and perceived disasters about climate change, from the late 19th century to the present day. Caroline has written a number of journal articles for publications such as TelosModern Fiction StudiesTextual PracticeContemporary LiteratureASAP/Journal, the New Statesman and the Times Higher Education Supplement. Her book chapter contributions on science and utopian fiction and contemporary literature include chapters for The Cambridge Companion to British Fiction, 1980-2018 (ed. Peter Boxall), The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, 2nd edition (ed. Niall Harrison, Farah Mendlesohn and Edward James), Science Fiction: A Literary History (ed. Roger Luckhurst, for the British Library Press), The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction (ed. Daniel O’Gorman and Robert Eaglestone), British Literature in Transition, 1980–2000: Accelerated Times (ed. Eileen Pollard and Berthold Schoene, Cambridge University Press, 2019) and the Palgrave Handbook of Utopian and Dystopian Literature (ed. Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor, Fátima Vieira and Peter Marks). In addition to her public engagement work, Caroline has also been invited to lecture at a number of academic and public institutions, including Harvard University, the European Commission in Brussels, the LSE, King’s College London, the National Library of Sweden, the University of Durham, the Academy of the Fine Arts in Vienna, UCL, the University of Cardiff, the Royal Irish Academy, SOAS, the University of Warwick, the Literary London Society, the British Library, Queen Mary, University of London, and the Institute of English Studies. She has given media interviews for the BBC, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Times Higher Education, the Austrian national broadcaster Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF) and the Guardian. She is regularly involved in public speaking and has been invited to share her research in events at the Wellcome Trust, the Institute of Contemporary Arts, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 3, Hillingdon Literary Festival, the Museum of London, BBC One South East, the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, and the LSE Literary Festival. Caroline is known for her advocacy in open access publishing. She is Founding and Commissioning Editor of the open access journal of 21st-century literary criticism, Alluvium, and is Founder (with Prof. Martin Eve) and Editorial Director of the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) – a leading open access publishing platform for humanities journals, which is also working with numerous international partners including: Harvard University Press, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Open Book Publishers, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Public Knowledge Project, the Wellcome Trust, the British Library, the Creative Commons, RCUK, Jisc Collections, and the Modern Languages Association. As part of her campaigning for open access and work in publishing, Caroline regularly gives invited keynote talks and lectures at open access conferences and publishing events. Caroline supervises several PhD research students working on contemporary literature and science fiction, as well as digital humanities, projects. She welcomes PhD applications on the following topics: 21st-century literature, utopian and dystopian narratives, science fiction (particularly feminist SF, ecocatastrophe narratives, the New Weird, and contemporary slipstream), apocalyptic literature and culture, literary and critical theory, Western Marxism and the philosophy of the Frankfurt School. Caroline was on grant-funded leave from teaching for 2015-2018. Between 2013 and 2015, she was Director of the MA Contemporary Literature and Culture and taught on the BA English, MA Contemporary Literature and Culture, MA Modern and Contemporary Literature and MA Cultural and Critical Studies. Caroline joined the department in September 2013, having previously worked as Lecturer in English at the University of Lincoln (2011-2013), Tutor in English Literature at the University of Surrey (2010-2011) and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Nottingham (2008). She was made a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in 2016 and was a founding Secretary of the British Association for Contemporary Literary Studies (BACLS). Contact details: Email: caroline.edwards@bbk.ac.uk Twitter: @the_blochian Website: http://www.drcarolineedwards.com/

MemberJonathan Best

Jonathan L. Best holds a Ph.D. in Practical Theology from St. Thomas University in Miami, FL. His dissertation is titled: A Postmodern Theology of Ritual Action? An Exploration of Foot Washing among the Original Free Will Baptist Community. Jonathan also holds a M.Div. from Campbell University and a B.S. in History from the University of Mount Olive.    Jonathan is also the founder of Best Academic Editing. An editing service specializing in dissertation and theses writing. Explore his services here: http://www.bestacademicediting.com Jonathan is an ordained ministry of the Original Free Will Baptist Convention

MemberSusan Oosthuizen

…r Management for Sustainable Pastoral Productivity on Early Medieval Commons: The peat wetlands of eastern England, c.600-900’

In preparation, Oosthuizen, S. ‘Landscapes of Otherness in Early Medieval England, c400-800AD’

In preparation, ‘Memory Across the Longue Durèe: Early Anglo-Saxon landholdings in 13th-century fenland’

2016. Oosthui…

I am Emeritus Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of Cambridge. My current research focuses on the origins of the English, collective governance in early medieval and medieval England, and on transformation and continuity in the Anglo-Saxon rural landscape, particularly as evidenced in fields, pastures and settlement. A list of my most recent books and papers can be found alongside this profile. I am a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and of the Royal Historical Society, and an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge.

MemberMaja Milatovic

Dr Maja Milatovic is Manager, Student Engagement and Internships, at the College of Global Studies, Arcadia University, Australia. Maja holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Edinburgh (UK), a Master of Arts in Postmodern Fiction from Aberystwyth University (UK) and a Qualified Teacher degree in English and French Language and Literature from the University of Zadar (Croatia). She has previously published on international education, pedagogy, and equality and diversity issues in higher education. Her current research interests are located at the intersections of international education, human rights and pedagogy, with a special focus on disaster risk education and the role of teaching methodologies in preparedness and response activities.

MemberChristina Spiker

My name is Christina Spiker and I am a scholar of modern Japanese art and visual culture. I am currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN. I received my Ph.D. in Visual Studies at the University of California, Irvine. My work is concerned with the histories and theories of globalization, modernity, travel, and exchange in modern and contemporary Japan. In my doctoral dissertation, I investigated the visual encounters between the indigenous Ainu in northern Japan and Euro-American/Japanese tourists, artists, and anthropologists at the turn-of-the-twentieth century. In my work, I pay close attention to the reproduction and circulation visual culture in media such as postcards, illustrations, and newspapers. I enjoy working with archival material in addition to experimenting in the digital humanities. Recently, I have become interested in expanding my research in issues of representation to include more contemporary media, such as animation and video games.

MemberMatthew Bokovoy

I am senior acquiring editor in the fields of Native American and Indigenous Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Ethnography, History of Anthropology, Non-fiction of the American West, and Literary Memoir of the American West. I conceived the major, social science documentary project, The Franz Boas Papers: Documentary Edition (25 vols.) with my colleagues at University of Nebraska Press, Regna Darnell of University of Western Ontario, and Martin Levitt of American Philosophical Society, funded by $2.5 million CAD from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. I am an American and European historian (PhD, Temple University, 1999) in intellectual, social, and cultural history of the 19th and 20th Century that writes about urban history, architecture and urban planning, historical memory, anthropological race theory, history of science, intellectuals and war, and California and US Southwest history. My work has been published in scholarly journals such as the Journal of the American Planning Association, Reviews in American History, AHA Perspectives, and the New Mexico Historical Review. I am author of The San Diego World’s Fairs and Southwestern Memory, 1880-1940 (University of New Mexico Press, 2005), a finalist for the San Diego Book Award. My reviews have been published in American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Journal of Religion, Journal of American Ethnic History, Pacific Historical Review, Western American Literature, Western Historical Quarterly, and New Mexico Historical Review. I am currently working on a new book, entitled “Manic-Depressive Illness: An Intellectual History of Bipolar Disorder from Hippocrates to Biological Psychiatry.” I play lead guitar in Red Cities (Lincoln, NE), a garage punk band on Modern Peasant Records. The Big Takeover Magazine said: “On breakneck blasters like ‘Worker Song’ and ‘Come Now Baby,’ Red Cities’ unashamedly summon slashing ‘Search and Destroy’ simulating riffs – tension-building, jet engine-explosive punk that exhilarates.” I am also a producer for Modern Peasant Records, having sponsored The Sinners’ Drunk on the Lord’s Day (MPR-013) and John Wayne’s Bitches’ Bitched Out (MPR-011). I blog about the history of punk rock, hardcore, and indy rock at the music podcast Doc Rockavoy’s Indy Music Garage.

MemberHelga Müllneritsch

I recently completed my PhD in German Studies at the University of Liverpool. My thesis, Memory, Education, Circulation, Prestige: Form and Function of the Austrian Manuscript Cookery Book in the Long Eighteenth Century, focuses on the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century manuscript cookery book as object, its function, and female authorship and ownership. My publications in the history of food and cookery include ‘The ‘Who’ of Manuscript Recipe Books: Tracing Professional Scribes’, in Sjuttonhundratal: Nordic Yearbook for Eighteenth-Century Studies (2017) and ‘The Roast Charade: Travelling Recipes and their Alteration in the Long Eighteenth Century’, in Tim Berndtsson et al (eds.), Traces of Transnational Relations in the Eighteenth Century (Uppsala 2015).