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DepositThe Middle Ages as Identity Marker in Heavy Metal: The Spanish Case

Medievalism is not alien to heavy metal music. It is actually a prominent feature of two of its most successful subgenres, power metal and pagan metal, and it recurs in the aesthetics and the lyrics of most classical heavy metal bands. Warriors, knights, sorcerers, minstrels, and the whole cast of contemporary popular medievalising literature and cinema alternate with Germanic mythology, traditional ballads, epic poetry, Crusaders, Vikings, and many other supposedly more historical topics. The reasons behind this fascination of heavy metal for the Middle Ages are not understudied, celebratory masculinity and a longing for a simpler, nobler, and more fulfilling lifestyle being the most cited causes. However, these two motives do not explain the apparent urge to naturalise the Middle Ages that can be felt nowadays. Bands move away from the generic medievalism of the old days and colour it with their own regional medieval cultural heritage. This paper explores the naturalisation process of heavy metal medievalism and its consequences through the case study of Spanish bands. First, it will determine which aspects of the Hispanic medieval cultural heritage are vindicated and why. Second, it will analyse how they are received within Spanish society and outside. Last, it will read the conclusions of both previous sections against the background of the current problematic of the appropriation of the Middle Ages by nationalistic and racist far-right groups, that is, the creation of a “Western male white identity”.

TopicCFP: Transformation & Continuity in Cuba Int'l Conference March 20-21, 2020

The main theme for Kennesaw State University’s Year of Cuba International Conference invites interdisciplinary approaches to the multiple, enriching, and conflicting intersections taking place in this country. This forum serves as a platform to engage in scholarly conversations that will contribute to understanding the complexities of Cuba, generating new forms of engagement and learning, and appreciating […]

MemberNatasha Bailey

I am a cultural and gender historian, whose work focuses primarily on indigenous Nahua women in central Mexico during the early colonial period (early C16-mid C17). In my doctoral research I look at the participation of Nahua women in producing and selling the alcoholic beverage pulque and how their domination of the trade offered opportunities to negotiate their social position within a colonial state. My doctoral project brings together scholarship from gender history, indigenous history and drinking studies, pursuing an innovative methodology that combines source materials in Spanish, Nahuatl and visual languages.

MemberKevin Sedeño-Guillén

Dr. Kevin Sedeño-Guillén is a visiting assistant professor in the Spanish and Portuguese department at Colorado College. He is a Latin Americanist with an emphasis in colonial Latin America and a comparative focus in the Caribbean and Andean regions. His main area of expertise is the historiography of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish-American literary criticism. He has experience teaching Spanish Language at all levels, but he has a special concentration on academic and creative writing coaching. He has widely published on Reinaldo Arenas, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, Pedro Blas Julio, Rómulo Bustos Aguirre, Alejo Carpentier, Gabriel García Márquez, José Lezama Lima, Dulce María Loynaz, Rafael María Merchán, Manuel del Socorro Rodríguez, and María Zambrano, among other authors. He co-edited the collection of essays La narrativa de Mayra Montero: hacia una literatura transnacional caribeña (2008). Sedeño-Guillén’s research has been generously supported by the Biblioteca Nacional de Colombia, Cuban Heritage Collection of University of Miami, University of Kentucky Graduate School and Ibero-American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies. He is currently working to transform his dissertation, Modernidades contra-natura: crítica ilustrada, prensa periódica y cultura manuscrita en el siglo XVIII americano, into a book.

DepositLa colección Fernández Rivero de fotografía antigua

The Fernández Rivero Collection of old photography is a collection of original photographic objects of more than 45,000 pieces of different types. The CFRivero has been formed with a historicist approach so that it could cover museum and teaching purposes. About two thirds of his pieces are from the 19th century, of which most could be described as a fundamental part of the Spanish photographic heritage of this period. It is therefore a collection primarily of Spanish historical photography, although it also contains notable representative examples of photography from France, the United Kingdom and other countries, in addition to two special sections: stereoscopic photography and photography related to Malaga and its province. The owners have been developing a wide dissemination and investigation of the photographic phenomenon, especially focused on the 19th century. / La Colección Fernández Rivero de fotografía antigua es una colección de objetos fotográficos originales de más de 45000 piezas de diversa tipología. La CFRivero se ha formado con un criterio historicista de manera que pudiese cubrir fines museísticos y didácticos. Alrededor de dos tercios de sus piezas son del siglo XIX, de las cuales la mayor parte podrían describirse como parte fundamental del patrimonio fotográfico español de este periodo. Es por tanto una colección fundamentalmente de fotografía histórica española, aunque contiene también notables ejemplos representativos de fotografía de Francia, Reino Unido y otros países, además de dos secciones especiales: fotografía estereoscópica y fotografía relacionada con Málaga y su provincia. Los propietarios vienen desarrollando una amplia labor de difusión e investigación del fenómeno fotográfico, centrado especialmente en el siglo XIX.

MemberYolanda Padilla

I am an interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersections of Latinx, American, and Latin American studies, with an emphasis on transnational approaches to these fields. My scholarship is animated by two commitments. First, I aim to recover and foreground the voices and forms of knowledge produced by colonized and dispossessed peoples. Second, I am dedicated to examining the transnational and historically informed presence and contributions of Latinx people to the making of the U.S. nation. To these ends, my work foregrounds the continuous life of Mexican Americans within and around the United States, especially through an analysis of their literary and cultural expressions, a focus on Spanish-language print culture materials, and by seeking out archives that illuminate Mexican American struggles over inequalities. I also examine Mexico’s continuing role as a protagonist in the making of Mexican American political subjectivities. By this I mean that I consider Mexican Americans’ continuing commitment to Mexican politics and culture even as their lives were embedded in the U.S. imperial order as a consequence of the U.S.-Mexican war. Such work not only provides a historical grounding for contemporary Chicanx identities, it adds an attention to the long history of their roles as dynamic agents in multiple nations, and to the influence of other national projects in the U.S. national space.   I am currently working on a book manuscript that grapples with such issues by studying Mexican American engagements with the Mexican Revolution. Titled “Revolutionary Subjects: The Mexican Revolution in Mexican American Cultural Politics, 1910-1959,” the book argues that Mexicans in the United States responded to the political and social exigencies arising from the Revolution in ways that were influenced by their conditions as members of an embattled and emerging ethnic group. These engagements resulted in a geopolitically-grounded border knowledge that imagined Mexican American relationships to and critiques of the United States in ways that were mediated by their engagements with Mexican politics and culture. This project allows for a continued examination of how Mexican Americans have been excluded from the United States, but adds a focus on how they have operated as dynamic parts of multiple nations and of transnational phenomena. I have published essays related to this work in Women’s Studies QuarterlyCR: The New Centennial Review, and in the volume Open Borders to a Revolution: Culture, Politics, and Migration (eds. Jaime Marroquín Arredondo, Adela Pineda Franco, and Magdalena Mieri).   Moreover, my research emphasizes the collective effort of recovering and examining little-known source materials that are vital to continued innovation of thought. Most of the literary works I examine in my book manuscript were originally written in the early twentieth century and have been recovered recently. I have engaged most directly in the process of recovery through my work on Spanish-language newspapers in the U.S. Southwest—an archive I draw from extensively in my scholarship. My work on early twentieth-century newspaper and literary writings by Mexicans in the United States led to my appointment as a contributing editor for the Heath Anthology of American Literature in 2011. I am also on the national advisory board for the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Project directed by Nicolás Kanellos and based at the University of Houston.

MemberPeter J Garcia

Dr. Peter J. García is Professor at California State University Northridge where he teaches in Anthropology, Music, and Chicana and Chicano Studies. His research in U.S. Latinx and Mexican  borderlands focuses on indigenous and settler music-culture intersectionalities and contact zones between and among New Mexican, Northern Mexican and Southwest  Native American (indigenous) communities and immigrant barrios on both sides of the US/Mexico border. García is also faculty advisor, directs and performs  with the CSUN Latin/x music ensemble and Mariachi “el Matador.”  García was Fulbright García-Robles grantee to Mexico in 2007 and continues ethnographic research on the annual peregrinacion (pilgrimage) in Magdalena de Kino (Sonora).

MemberAlice Tavares

Alice Tavares holds a PhD in History, Medieval Age specialty, at University of Lisbon (Portugal). I also hold a Master in Regional and Local History and I graduated in History at the College of Letters of the University of Lisbon. My two thesis devoted to Common Law in the Middle Age. Besides she got the Homologation of the Degree in History by the Faculty of Letters of the University of Lisbon to the Official Spanish University Degree in History by the Ministry of Education and Science – General Technical Secretariat. Subdirectorate General of Titles, Convalidations and Homologations, with Series A Nº0356242 / 2007 / H05163. Currently, Alice Tavares is a research in History at New University of Lisbon. I was involved in many national and international research projects, as a project, partner in the framework of the Horizon Research and Innovation Program (H2020) of the European Comission and national programs. I worked in very projects about Heritage; merchants, networks business, culture and art Sephardic Jewish; Local and National Justice in The Middle Age and Early Modern Age. Your last project was about the múdejar in Portugal (architecture and historical perception), of Instituto de Estudios Turolenses (Teruel, Aragón -Spain). I was publishing books chapters and articles in peer reviewed journals (Scopus/Web of Science), dictionary and catalogue entries, reviews in Portugal, Spain, Romania, Brazil, Chile and Italy about animals (birds, fisheries, transport animals), Sephardic Jewish and Common Law. I have very interesting nacional and internacional dissemination of my research. I was also collaborated with journals and the Blog, Lugares con Historia. Since 2017, I was Scientific Correspondent in the Progressus Journal (Siena, Italy).

MemberMariana Strassacapa Ou

I am a converted Londoner, originally from São Paulo. After working a few years in Sao Paulo as an architect and graphic designer, I came to the UK to pursue a master’s in Library Science. Having received my degree from City, University of London, I worked with cataloguing and digitisation of special items, such as pamphlets and posters, from the incredible archives of the Marx Memorial Library. I love all aspects of research work. My main interests at the moment: archive studies, library and archive history, digital archives, Spanish civil war. History, social history, and philosophy are passions that leave traces on everything I write and do. I am currently reading: a history of lighthouses, a global history of work, and a collection of British classic ghost stories