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MemberRichard Kirwan

Dr Richard Kirwan specialises in early modern European history with a focus on the German-speaking lands of the Holy Roman Empire. His research interests include the social and cultural history of early modern universities and the world of learning, early modern print culture, and the culture and politics of religious conversion. Dr Kirwan’s current project is a study of religious conversion, exile and migration among scholars in the Holy Roman Empire, c. 1555- c. 1648. This project is funded by the Gerda Henkel Stiftung. Dr Richard Kirwan is Lecturer in History at the University of Limerick. His research interests include the social and cultural history of early modern universities and the world of learning, early modern print culture, and the culture and politics of religious conversion. His work focuses on the German-speaking lands of the Holy Roman Empire. His current project, funded by the Gerda Henkel Stiftung, is a study of academic religious conversion, migration and exile in the Empire in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Prior to taking up his position at the University of Limerick, Dr Kirwan held posts at the University of St Andrews, the European University Institute, Florence (Max Weber Fellow), Maynooth University (IRCHSS Postdoctoral Fellow), and Trinity College Dublin.  

MemberLynn Caldwell

Lynn Caldwell has been on faculty with St. Andrew’s College in Saskatoon, Canada, since 2009, and in the fulltime position of Professor of Church and Society since 2015.  She graduated from St. Andrew’s College with an MDiv in 1995, which served as preparation for further study and work in anti-racist and anti-oppressive education including graduate studies and teaching in Sociology and Equity Studies in Education.  Her work broadly focuses on race, nostalgia and settler colonialism, particularly in contexts framed as social justice education.

MemberStefano Dall'Aglio

I am a historian at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, where I am a team member of the Venice Centre for Digital and Public Humanities in the Department of Humanities. I am a political and religious historian of early modern Italy. My interests include Public History, Digital Humanities, and archival studies. I am Senior Research Fellow at the Medici Archive Project (New York-Florence) and have held fellowships at Villa I Tatti-the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, the Institut d’Histoire de la Réformation of Geneva, the Newberry Library of Chicago, the USTC Project at the University of St Andrews, the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, and the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. From 2006 to 2010 I was a Fondazione Monte dei Paschi di Siena Fellow at the Medici Archive Project (MAP) and from 2011 to 2015 I was a Research Fellow in the ERC project ‘Italian Voices’ at the University of Leeds. I also taught at Sapienza University, Florence University of the Arts, and the University of Edinburgh. I have published several books and articles on political and religious dissent in Renaissance Florence and Italy, with a specific focus on Girolamo Savonarola and sixteenth-century Savonarolism and political opposition to the Medici. My monograph ‘The Duke’s Assassin. Exile and Death of Lorenzino de’ Medici’ (Yale University Press, 2015) won the Helen and Howard R. Marraro Prize awarded by the American Historical Association and its Chinese edition is forthcoming with China CITIC Press. My article ‘Voices under Trial. Inquisition, Abjuration, and Preachers’ Orality in Sixteenth-Century Italy’ (Renaissance Studies, 2017) was awarded a honorable mention by the Society for Renaissance Studies. I am currently working in collaboration with the Medici Archive Project on a newly discovered corpus of letters written by the prince and cardinal Leopoldo de’ Medici to his agent in Rome Ottavio Falconieri, producing both a digital online edition and a scholarly monograph.