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MemberJulia Verkholantsev

I am a scholar of cultural, religious and intellectual history, early modern and medieval literary and linguistic culture. My publications and research are concerned with the cultural space of eastern, central, and southern Europe, particularly, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Bohemia, Poland, Croatia, Hungary, and Rus. In research and teaching, I deal with topics that include the history of and approaches to language, writing, and literacy; pre-modern historical writing and historical methods; Slavic (Cyrillic, Glagolitic, and Latin) and Greek paleography and cryptography; projects and theories of universal language; and Russian medieval and modern literature and culture. As a medievalist, I am convinced that the mapping of pre-modern Europe into the modern East – West divide creates unnecessary gaps between fields of knowledge that are inherently interconnected and impedes a dialogue between scholars who find themselves working in artificially bounded sub-disciplines. In my research and professional service I try to remedy this situation. In my teaching, I examine medieval literary and historical topics in the context of modern society and help students see their importance in the development of contemporary culture, politics, and social norms. I focus on the study of reading strategies of imaginative texts that leads to the advanced understanding of literature as part of cultural history.

MemberLouise Hardiman

Louise Hardiman is an art historian specialising in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian and Soviet art. She is a graduate of the universities of Oxford, London, and Cambridge, where she completed a PhD on the history of Russian Arts and Crafts in Victorian and Edwardian Britain. Her primary research areas concern the history of the neo-national revival and Anglo-Russian cultural exchange. Hardiman teaches for universities and adult education providers on a freelance basis and lectures frequently for education institutions, galleries, and museums. She was consultant to the Watts Gallery (Guildford, UK) exhibition ‘A Russian Fairy Tale: The Art and Craft of Elena Polenova’ (2014-15).

MemberConnor Doak

I have been a lecturer in Russian at the University of Bristol since 2013. I  am currently serving as Head of Subject in the Department of Russian & Czech. In broad terms, my research explores the relationship between literature and life, art and society, language and power. My area of specialization is Russian literature, culture and society from the Romantic period to the present day. I have a particular interest in cultural manifestations of gender and sexuality, especially the treatment of masculinity in experimental texts in literature and film. I have published on queer aspects of Dostoevsky’s novels, on fatherhood in Chekhov’s short stories, and contested national identities and histories in Pushkin and Byron’s narrative poems. I am currently working on a monograph on masculinity and power in the work of Vladimir Maiakovskii. The book deconstructs the popular image of Maiakovskii as a ‘manly’ poet, a myth propagated not only by the writer himself, but by generations of critics in both Russia and the West, seduced by his work, and in possession of a powerful, but unarticulated and uncritical, gender essentialism. The book goes beyond the cliché of Maiakovskii as a manly poet, showing how he uses verse to negotiate the shifting terrain of masculinity in revolutionary Russia and the early Soviet period. My teaching covers a broad range of topics and themes in Russian literature and culture from 1800 to the present, with occasional forays into earlier periods. At upper levels, my teaching includes research-based classes such as ‘Gender in 20C and 21C Russia’, ‘Writing Revolution: Russian Literature 1910-1940’, and ‘Russia and the World since 1991’. My approach to teaching is explicitly interdisciplinary and comparative, and I regularly contribute to comparative literature and culture teaching both at undergraduate and graduate level. I also have experience teaching Russian language at all levels.

MemberCatherine Gibson

I am a researcher at the European University Institute specialising in the history of science in the Russian Empire in the long nineteenth century. I am particularly interested in how local populations understood and participated in the production of cartographical knowledge about the empire and its peoples. Co-editor of the scholarly blog Peripheral Histories? A collaborative digital history of the Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet provinces, localities, and republics. https://peripheralhistories.wixsite.com/ NEW PUBLICATION: ‘Shading, Lines, Colours: Mapping Ethnographic Taxonomies of European Russia, 1851-1875.’ Nationalities Papers (2018): 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1080/00905992.2017.1364229

MemberAntony Hoyte-West

Antony Hoyte-West is an interdisciplinary researcher focusing on multilingualism and translation studies. His research interests include historical and contemporary language policy, the institutional translation of minority languages, and the professional status of translators and interpreters. To date, he has presented his work at international conferences in a range of countries, and is the author of several peer-reviewed publications. He is also the Language Editor of Discourses on Culture, a peer-reviewed journal published by the University of Social Sciences, Warsaw.

MemberAmber Nickell

Amber N. Nickell is a Ph.D. Candidate at Purdue University. Her primary research and teaching field is “Modern Central and Eastern European History”; however, she completed minor preliminary exam fields in “Transnational Germany” and “Russian Imperial Borderlands.”  She earned a Master’s degree in American history (2013) and a Bachelor’s degree in European history (2011) from the University of Northern Colorado. She has presented her work at numerous local, national, and international conferences, workshops, and symposia and received a number of awards for her writing, research, service, and teaching. Additionally, she is a recipient of several research grants and fellowships, including the 2016 Auschwitz Jewish Center Fellowship, Title VIII Grants, and most recently the Fulbright Fellowship (Ukraine). Amber’s training as a scholar of both Europe and the United States enables her to conduct research and teach across these fields. Her methodologies transcend the national, focusing on transnational phenomena, including migration, diaspora, deportation, ethnic cleansing, genocide, human rights, and internationalism. Her command of the spatial humanities augments these strengths. Amber’s most recent publication, “Time to Show the Kremlin America’s Full House: The Committee for Human Rights in the Soviet Union, Rabbi Gedalyah Engel, and their Refusnik Adoptees, 1977-1992,” which appeared in The Transnational Yearbook, Volume 1 (Fairleigh Dickenson, 2018), serves as one example. For more details, see: https://rowman.com/isbn/9781683930037/yearbook-of-transnational-history-(2018)-volume-1 Amber’s current project, tentatively titled “Brotherlands to Bloodlands: Ethnic Germans and Jews in Southern Ukraine, Late Tsarist to Postwar” examines coexistence and confluence between the two groups in territories which now fall in Southern Ukraine and Moldova. She considers the astounding territorial, political, and demographic shifts in the region and ponders their impact on intergroup relationships. In doing so, she illuminates historical processes that transformed interactions between ethnic Germans and their Jewish neighbors from neighborly to murderous.