Search

MemberSam Barber

I study the material and visual cultures of late ancient and early medieval Europe, with a special focus on iconographies and architectures of authority in the post-Roman successor states. My doctoral dissertation investigates palaces between the time of Tetrarchy and that of the Carolingians. Though a constant across this period, palaces underwent dramatic changes architecturally, conceptually, and institutionally. By viewing them simultaneously as physical architecture, as social spaces, and as nodes in ‘royal landscapes’, I use palaces as a lens for examining shifting concepts of rulership and legitimate authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. In doing so I argue that they were not simple assertions of Roman-derived sovereignty, but rather essential instruments in the reordering of political space in the post-Roman West. In addition to my dissertation, I am also interested in the history of medieval art (including its historiography); urban studies and architectural theory; and concepts of identity, ethnicity, and community in the Early Middle Ages.

MemberSteven Foster

My research intends to trace the different ways the participants of the English Reformation tried to interpret the meaning of Romans 13:1-7 and how these interpretations made sense of the present during a period of seismic change.  The Pauline proof text ‘Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God’ (Rom.13:1), has been a neglected crux in the evolution of political theology and was central in the early modern debates which concerned politico-religious allegiance.

Memberkatrina

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. Her PhD thesis (University of Melbourne, 2011) focused on the relationship between garden design and theatre in Early Modern Italy. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas. Her main project is Digital Cartographies of the Roman Campagna, which is operating in collaboration with the British School at Rome. This project brings together historical maps with modern mapping technologies to recreate the lost landscape of the Roman Campagna, and draw together data and research from a variety of disciplines, including art and architectural history, social history, cultural geography and the history of climate and ecological change.

MemberRoman Bleier

Roman studied History and Religious studies at the University of Graz. He also completed a certificate in Information Modelling in the Humanities at the Centre for Information Modelling (ZIM – ACDH). Following his studies in Graz, he did an internship at the Saint Patrick’s Confessio HyperText Stack (http://www.confessio.ie), a project of the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin, and completed a Ph.D. in Digital Arts and Humanities at Trinity College Dublin. After finishing his Ph.D. in 2015, he worked as CENDARI Visiting Research Fellow at King’s College London and as Researcher at An Foras Feasa, the Digital Humanities Centre at Maynooth University. Since May 2016 Roman is DiXiT Post-Doc Fellow at the Centre for Information Modelling – Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities at Graz University. His current research project is about canonical reference and sustainability of digital editions.

MemberKatrina Grant

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently a lecturer at the Australian National University in the Centre for Digital HUmanities Research. She is also in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas.

MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. At Michigan, Linda teaches courses in Classical Art and Archaeology and Classical Civilization. She is also a postdoctoral scholar with the Michigan Society of Fellows and a Research Affiliate with the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. In fall 2020, Linda will join the faculty of Texas Tech University as an Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology.

MemberPrem Sai Ramani

I am an undergraduate student currently studying in my final year at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada. While my academic interests are quite varied, I am primarily interested in analytical chemistry, particularly in its application to archaeological science, and classical archaeology. I have spent three seasons digging at the Roman military site of Vindolanda along Hadrian’s school with the Vindolanda Field School. During this time, I have had the opportunity to conduct research on a few leather samples in the lab. I am primarily interested in understanding the extent of the degradation of chemical information, as well as the potential to identify and confirm tanning agents and other markers of the tanning process through scientific analysis.

MemberDaniel P. Diffendale

Mediterranean, sometime Classical, archaeologist. Currently I am researching the relationship between the ancient Romans, their volcanic landscape, and their built environment as director of the “Quarry provenience and Archaeological Dating of the Roman-Area Tuffs in Antiquity” (QUADRATA) Project. I also continue to study cult places in the context of local and regional political developments, with a particular interest in the 1st millennium BCE central Mediterranean, and am working on the architectural and ritual development of the sanctuary of Fortuna and Mater Matuta in Rome’s Forum Boarium during the Middle Republic, based on my recently completed dissertation titled “The Roman Middle Republic at Sant’Omobono.”