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MemberMatthew Scarborough

…amp; T. Olander (eds) Dispersals and diversification: Linguistic and archaeological perspectives on the early stages of Indo-European pp.179-208 (Leiden: Brill).

2017. “Studies in the Linguistic Prehistory of the Boeotian Dialect” Teiresias 47.1 : 14-24.

2015. “A New Edition of IG IX,2 69″ Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 193 : 166-171.

2014. “On the Phonology a…

I was awarded my Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (UK) in March 2017 for a dissertation on the linguistic prehistory and historical dialectology of the Aeolic dialects of Ancient Greek. Since October 2015 I have been also collaborating as a research associate with the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (Jena, Germany) on a new database of Indo-European cognate relations. From Fall 2019 to April 2020 I was a sessional lecturer in Classics at MacEwan University (Edmonton, Canada). My research interests can be subdivided into a handful of related topics:

  • Greek language and linguistics (from Mycenaean to the modern spoken language)
  • Ancient Greek dialect studies (from both literary and sub-literary sources)
  • Ancient Greek epigraphy and papyrology
  • Indo-European comparative linguistics and philology (including comparative myth and poetics)
  • Homer and other Early Greek poetry
  • Etymology and the Indo-European lexicon
  • Language classification, cladistics, and subgrouping methodologies in historical linguistics

MemberAli MOUSAVI

…I studied history, art history, prehistory, and archaeology at the University of Lyon, France. I obtained my doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley….

My interests range from the history of archaeology, cultural heritage preservation, and museum studies to the art and archaeology of ancient Iranian empires, from the Achaemenids to the Sasanians. I am currently involved in the exploration of the World Heritage site of Pasargadae, the first dynastic site of the Persian empire in the sixth century B.C.

MemberMary Agnes Edsall

My interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on the literatures and practices of Christian catechesis and devotion of the European Middle Ages, with attention to memory (personal and cultural), mnemonics, rhetorical theory, and the role of images and the emotions. I have recently published on early copies of Anselm of Canterbury’s Prayers and Meditations as exemplars of practice that drew their power from the way that they reproduced the charismatic presence of their author. Forthcoming articles address the patristic prehistory of medieval Arma Christi imagery and the connections between monastic anthologies for novice formation and household devotional anthologies of late medieval England. My research interests also include Hugh of Fouilloy, an under-studied writer whose works were widely read in his time (mid-twelfth century) and beyond.
I am currently writing a book, A Road of the Affections: Rhetoric, Catechesis, and the Cultivation of the Christian Self, A.D. 1-1150. This project rewrites a paradigm long central to the discipline of medieval history and the study of medieval devotional literature: affective piety. It demonstrates that the genealogy of affective piety goes back to the arts of disciplining the passions that originated in the philosophical schools of antiquity, for philosophers who taught disciplines of the soul were also rhetoricians who sought to move and persuade. Their methods were adapted by early Christian teachers and rhetorical appeals to the emotions became a basic preaching, literary, and prayer practice of the church. This project, therefore, recovers the history of how preaching, texts, and practices were used to shape the emotions and craft Christian selves at different times and places.

MemberCaroline Heitz

… No 169371: ‘Quantifying human impacts to tease apart cultural and climatic drivers of Holocene vegetation change – QuantHum’. University of Bern, Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Prehistory / Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR). http://p3.snf.ch/project-156205
since 2017: Vegetation and settlement history of the Binntal valley, Canton Valais, Swiss Alpes http…

  I am an archaeologist working on prehistoric wetland sites and the archaeology of alpine spaces, currently based at the University of Bern in Switzerland. I did my studies in Prehistoric and Roman Archaeology, Archaeological Science, Social Anthropology and the History of Eastern Europe. Accordingly, I have a deep interest in inter- and transdisciplinarity research. In my PhD thesis titling ‘Ceramics beyond Cultures: A praxeological approach to mobility, entanglements and transformation in the northern Alpine space (3950-3800 BC)’, I combined different thing, action, cultural and social theories with qualitative and quantitative methods of archaeology and archaeometry. While this project aimed at inquiring the role of spatial mobility for transformations in Neolithic pottery production and consumption practices, my latest research is focussed on the mutuality of human-environment-relations.  

MemberPeter-Alexander Kerkhof

I am a research fellow at Leiden University and Ghent University. My current research deals with the study of personal names and settlement names in Dutch and Belgian Brabant as a window on Brabantine medieval history. My expertise lies in on the crossroads between Germanic philology, Romance philology and medieval settlement history. Notable discoveries in my career have been

  • (2018) a Romance etymology for Dutch polder
  • (2018) a Celtic etymology for Dutch straf
  • (2014) reading the word auzandils on the Gothic Bologna fragment

From 2014-2016 and from 2018-20, I was a lecturer at Leiden University , teaching academic courses on Historical Linguistics, Old High German, Old Dutch, Old Saxon, Gothic, Paleolinguistics and Morphology. I have worked from 2016-2018 at the EVALISA project at Ghent University  where I focussed on the Proto-Indo-European origin of Old Germanic and Old Romance verbs that show non-canonical subject marking. In 2018, I received a PhD from Leiden University for my research on language contact between Merovingian Gallo-Romance and Merovingian Frankish. I have a keen interest in medieval vernacular languages and the historical experiences of the medieval commoner. By training, I am a linguist and a medievalist. In recent years, I have expanded my skills to include settlement history and agricultural history. I hope to improve my digital cartography skills in the future. I have written numerous popularizing articles about Dutch etymology, the history of the Dutch language and its links to the history of French. In the past years, I have also set up a national conference for Old Germanic Studies (Junius Symposium) together with my colleague Thijs Porck and I have given multiple newspaper and radio interviews on the prehistory of Dutch. I am also involved with several heritage projects highlighting the dimension of language when disclosing historical narratives.

MemberEugenia Zuroski

Eugenia Zuroski has been a member of the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University since 2009. Gena is author of the book A Taste for China: English Subjectivity and the Prehistory of Orientalism (Oxford University Press, 2013), which argues that chinoiserie played an integral role in the formation of modern English subjectivity. Tracing a shift in the relationship between English selves and “things Chinese” from the Restoration through the early nineteenth century, this study shows how both orientalism and privatized subjectivity take shape through cultural processes of disavowing earlier ideals, including cosmopolitanism and aristocratic power. Gena has published articles in Novel: A Forum on Fiction, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Journal18. In addition to teaching courses in literatures and cultures of the long eighteenth century, she teaches introductory level undergraduate courses in short fiction and poetry and one of the core courses in the graduate Cultural Studies and Critical Theory (CSCT) program, “Foundations in CSCT.” In addition to her teaching and research, Gena serves as editor of Eighteenth-Century Fiction, winner of the 2017 CELJ Voyager Award. She has edited special issues of ECF on “Exoticism & Cosmopolitanism” (Fall 2012) and “The Senses of Humour” (Summer 2014). Most recently, she co-edited a 2-part special issue of ECF on “Material Fictions” with Michael Yonan (Dept. of Art History and Archaeology, U of Missouri), published in late 2018 and early 2019. The recipient of a SSHRC Insight Grant, Gena is currently completing a book which argues for the emergence of politically relevant forms of “funniness” in eighteenth-century literature, aesthetics, and subjectivity.  She has been invited to present portions of this project at the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities 18th/19th-Century Colloquium at Vanderbilt University; the Columbia University Seminar in Eighteenth-Century European Culture; the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies Research Seminar at the University of York, UK; the University of East Anglia Research Seminar; and in keynotes for the British Women Writer’s Conference and the David Nichol Smith Seminar. Gena serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Society of Learned Journals, the Executive Board of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Editorial Board of Scholarly and Research Communication, and the Advisory Board of the Hamilton Review of Books. She is currently the faculty co-chair of McMaster’s President’s Advisory Committee on Building an Inclusive Community (PACBIC), and an organizing member of the #BIPOC18 and #Bigger6 collectives. Her first chapbook of poetry, Hovering, Seen, was published by Anstruther Press in 2019.

MemberAshley Gardini

…8217;s of Art, emphasis Art History

San Francisco State University – Bachelor’s of Art, emphasis Art History

 

Teaching Experience:

Art history survey courses covering Prehistory to the 18th century.
Architectural history courses covering Prehistory to Contemporary architecture

 

Contact: 

agardini [at] ccsf [dot] edu
agardini [at] dvc [dot] …

Ashley Gardini is an art historian specializing in modern Italian architecture. Her initial research focused on Antonio Sant’Elia and the development of Italian Futurist architecture. That evolved into analyzing the influence of Italian Futurist architecture during both the interwar and post-World War II periods. Now she has expanded her focus to looking beyond the role of Italian Futurism. Her work was presented at the 33rd annual conference of the American Association of Italian Studies. It has since been published in both the 2017 and 2018 editions of the Yearbook of Futurism Studies. Her current active areas of research interests are:

  • Italian Futurist architecture.
  • Women in architecture during the Fascist era.
  • 1950s and 1960s Italian architecture and design.

In addition to academic research, Ashley Gardini teach both art history and architectural history at community colleges in the San Francisco Bay Area.    

MemberJane Wessel

…production of Celebrity in Eighteenth-Century England,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 60.1 (Spring 2019): 65-86.

“Possessing Parts and Owning Plays: Charles Macklin and the Prehistory of Dramatic Literary Property,” Theatre Survey 56.3 (September 2015): 268-290.

“Performing ‘A Ra-ree Show’: Political Spectacle and the Treason Trial of Stephen College,” Resto…

I am an Assistant Professor of English at the US Naval Academy. My research interests include eighteenth-century British literature, theatre history, performance studies, celebrity, and the intersections of literature and law. My book project on literary property and the eighteenth-century stage examines the attempts of playwrights, actors, and theatre managers to “own” the ephemeral and unfixed performance of their plays.

MemberJames Green

I have been a working archaeologist for almost 30 years in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States. I am experienced with all aspects of terrestrial archaeological survey, site testing, site mitigation, artifact analysis, curation, data management, historic and archival research, and report writing. I have supervised hundreds of Phase I site delineations and have crewed or supervised numerous Phase II and III prehistoric and historic site investigations. I have taught prehistoric lithic and ceramic analysis, as well as historic artifact analysis to up to 8 individuals at the corporate level. I have given knapping and prehistoric pottery making demonstrations, as well as reproducing prehistoric vessels for museums and corporate culture. I am a GIS professional who uses aerial imagery and LiDAR to analyze the terrain on a regular basis. Additionally, I have spent almost 20 years processing and analyzing offshore geophysical data.