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MemberConnor Doak

I have been a lecturer in Russian at the University of Bristol since 2013. I  am currently serving as Head of Subject in the Department of Russian & Czech. In broad terms, my research explores the relationship between literature and life, art and society, language and power. My area of specialization is Russian literature, culture and society from the Romantic period to the present day. I have a particular interest in cultural manifestations of gender and sexuality, especially the treatment of masculinity in experimental texts in literature and film. I have published on queer aspects of Dostoevsky’s novels, on fatherhood in Chekhov’s short stories, and contested national identities and histories in Pushkin and Byron’s narrative poems. I am currently working on a monograph on masculinity and power in the work of Vladimir Maiakovskii. The book deconstructs the popular image of Maiakovskii as a ‘manly’ poet, a myth propagated not only by the writer himself, but by generations of critics in both Russia and the West, seduced by his work, and in possession of a powerful, but unarticulated and uncritical, gender essentialism. The book goes beyond the cliché of Maiakovskii as a manly poet, showing how he uses verse to negotiate the shifting terrain of masculinity in revolutionary Russia and the early Soviet period. My teaching covers a broad range of topics and themes in Russian literature and culture from 1800 to the present, with occasional forays into earlier periods. At upper levels, my teaching includes research-based classes such as ‘Gender in 20C and 21C Russia’, ‘Writing Revolution: Russian Literature 1910-1940’, and ‘Russia and the World since 1991’. My approach to teaching is explicitly interdisciplinary and comparative, and I regularly contribute to comparative literature and culture teaching both at undergraduate and graduate level. I also have experience teaching Russian language at all levels.

MemberOscar Martinez-Peñate

Lic. en Relaciones Internacionales en la Universidad Autónoma de Centro América (UACA), Costa Rica; MA en Ciencia Política en L’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Canadá; MA en Gobernabilidad Democrática y Alta Gerencia Pública en el Instituto Universitario de Investigación José Ortega y Gasset Adscrito a la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España; D octor en Ciencias Sociales en la Universidad de El Salvador (UES). Docente universitario e investigador académico.

MemberMaria Manuel Borges

Maria Manuel Borges is an Associate Professor in Information Science at the University of Coimbra and co-coordinator of the Digital Humanities Group at the Centre for 20th Century Interdisciplinary Studies – CEIS20 of the University of Coimbra. She is the Head of the Department of Philosophy, Communication, and Information. She is also the coordinator of PhD and Graduation courses in Information Science of the University of Coimbra. She has supervised several PhD and Master theses. She is a member of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics, Association of Digital Humanities (AHDig), and BAD, the Portuguese Association of Librarians and Archivists. She is also a member of the editorial board of national and international journals and Associate Editor of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). She is a member of the Interministerial Working Group, sub-group Research Assessment, whose mission is, among others, to advise the Portuguese Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education about the strategic orientation for the National Open Science initiative sub-group Evaluation of Science. She is also a member of the Research Data Alliance and a member of the board supported by the University of Coimbra of the node RDA.pt. Her current research interests are on scholarly communication with a focus on open access, research evaluation, digital preservation, digital libraries, and copyright.

MemberMartin Paul Eve

Martin Paul Eve is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. Previously he was a Lecturer in English at the University of Lincoln, UK and an Associate Tutor/Lecturer at the University of Sussex, where he completed his Ph.D. Martin specialises in contemporary American fiction (primarily the works of Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and David Foster Wallace), histories and philosophies of technology, and technological mutations in scholarly publishing. He is the author of four books, Pynchon and Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Foucault and Adorno (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014: 9781137405494), Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future (Cambridge University Press, 2014: 9781107484016), Password (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016: 9781501314872), and Literature Against Criticism: University English & Contemporary Fiction in Conflict (Open Book Publishers, 2016: 9781783742738). From 2015-2020, Martin is a member of the UK English Association’s Higher Education committee. In addition, Martin is well-known for his work on open access and HE policy, appearing before the UK House of Commons Select Committee BIS Inquiry into Open Access, writing for the British Academy Policy Series on the topic, being a steering-group member of the OAPEN-UK project, the Jisc National Monograph Strategy Group, the SCONUL Strategy Group on Academic Content and Communications, the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Access Steering Group, the Jisc Scholarly Communications Advisory Group, the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation advisory board, the California Digital Library/University of California Press’s Humanities Book Infrastructure advisory board, and the HEFCE Open Access Monographs Expert Reference Panel (2014) and founding the Open Library of Humanities.

MemberMichael Paskevicius

I am currently an assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Victoria. My research focuses on learning design practices, the development of digital literacies, and supporting personal knowledge management in an environment of rapid technological change. I have worked in higher education institutions across Southern Africa and Western Canada since 2005, supporting collaborative, creative, and personalized approaches to learning. As an advocate for openness in education, my research explores the integration of open source tools, open educational resources, and the development of open educational practices among educators. My work supporting and advancing open education has been recognized with an Award for Excellence in Open Education from BCcampus. I am a member of the Global Open Education Graduate Network (GO-GN), held a Digital Learning and Social Media Research Fellowship (2016), and helped facilitate the African Health Open Educational Resources (OER) Network (2009-2012).

MemberLucy Barnes

I’m Editor and Outreach Co-Ordinator at Open Book Publishers, a leading independent not-for-profit Open Access book publisher, founded and run by academics. I work with ScholarLed, a consortium of five academic-led, not-for-profit OA book presses of which Open Book Publishers is a founder member, and I do outreach work for the COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) project, which is building open, community-governed infrastructure to develop and strengthen Open Access book publishing. I’m also completing a PhD on theatrical adaptations of nineteenth-century novels and poetry. Cover photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash.