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MemberKate Brasseur

I am a graduate student at Carleton University working on my Master’s of History. I love medieval history, and since my undergrad have taken on the role of cataloguer-at-large, seeking out medieval materials in Ottawa in order to publish a catalogue of medieval content held in Canada’s capital city. The website, far from perfect, became the final project for my undergraduate thesis. (**The site is no longer private, please check it out!). This fascination with all things medieval began in January 2017, when I was given the opportunity to solve a mystery — a medieval manuscript lay open at the front of Carleton’s Archives and Research Collections (ARC) seminar room, its origins and contents still unknown. I was quickly drawn to paleography, and found myself immersed in the study of letter forms and abbreviations. After months of studying medieval codicology, taking Latin, French, and German courses, and frequenting archives more often than the cafe near my house, I decided not to look back. That is when I joined the Medieval and Early Modern Society and by the following September I became the club’s president. Nowadays you can find me in my office or at ARC working away at my thesis project which I hope to complete by Spring 2020. Check out my personal hcommons website to follow the progress of my work and learn about the wonderful tools that digital humanists are developing for medieval studies. And be sure to click the link to the Medieval Book website which charts the progress of the students of HIST 4006: Digitizing Medieval Archives as we create a physical exhibition for ARC’s manuscript books and folios and a corresponding digital exhibition to enhance the experience through soundscapes, an interactive paleographical tool, chant recreations, and high definition images.  

MemberTom White

I am currently finishing a monograph on late medieval manuscripts and their treatment from the medieval period to the modern day. ‘Working Theories of the Late Medieval Book: Manuscript Study in a Digital Age’ explores the figurative, interpretive and theoretical possibilities of manuscript study, with a particular focus on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, vernacular romance, bookmaking recipes, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Book of Sir John Mandeville, and Thomas Hoccleve’s Series. Drawing on contemporary theory, this project looks to position manuscript studies in relation to the fields of media archeology and critical infrastructure studies. I’ve published some of this work in the journal Exemplaria and some has also appeared on the Birkbeck Material Texts Network Blog. I also write on political ecology, renewable energy, and the role of visual culture in a time of climate crisis. A recent article on these topics–part of a new project tentatively titled Three Energy Stories: Humber, Clyde, Thames–appeared in the Open Library of Humanities. I am contributing editor of the Glasgow Review of Books and have contributed to MAP Magazine, The Trouble, the LRB Blog, the History Workshop Blog, and the British Library Discovering Literature resource.

MemberEmily Joyce Guigue

I have been interested in history for as long as I can remember and always knew it would be something I wanted to pursue. I am in my fourth year of an undergraduate combined major of history and classics with a minor in philosophy.  My research interests cover a large array of topics. If I were to try to narrow it down to a handful of key points of interest, I would have to say the conscription debates in Canada during World War One, ancient Greek pottery, and stoicism are three areas of research I thoroughly enjoy. As you can tell, these subjects are all vastly different from one another.  In an ideal world, I wish to pursue a masters degree in public history or library and archival studies. I am currently taking a course on medieval manuscripts and while it differs quite substantially from each of my research interests, I enjoy learning new things. I saw this course as the perfect opportunity to do so. I look forward to developing an understanding of part of the medieval world through my manuscript as well as opening it up to a larger public that otherwise would not have access to it. I often spend the majority of my days on campus buried in course material. When I am not working on assignments, I can be found at work at the Carleton library, reading a book, or on a run.

MemberHannah Busch

Hannah Busch is a Ph.D. candidate in the project Digital Forensics for Historical Documents at Huygens ING in Amsterdam. In her thesis, she focuses on the application of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for the study of medieval Latin paleography. Hannah studied German-Italian studies (B.A./Laurea Triennale) at the Universities of Bonn and Florence, followed by the completion of a M.A. in Textual Scholarship at the Free University of Berlin. Prior to moving to the Netherlands in 2018, she worked as research assistant at the Trier Center for Digital Humanities, where she was a member of the eCodicology-project. Her research interests include large scale digitization of medieval manuscripts, and  experimenting with the application of computational methods that can support and enhance the work of manuscripts scholars. She is member of the Digital Medievalist Postgraduate Subcommittee, and the editorial team of the German science blog Mittelalter – Interdisziplinäre Forschung und Rezeptionsgeschichte.