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DepositThe Diving Bell and the Butterfly: Locked-In Syndrome and the (Un)Ethics of Narrative as Personhood

This is a slightly revised version of the paper I gave for the Out of Narrative Bounds panel organized by the forums TC Medical Humanities and Health Studies and TC Age Studies. This panel was chosen as representative of the presidential theme, Boundary Conditions. In this paper I use Jean-Dominque Bauby’s memoir, The Diving-Bell and the Butterfly, to examine ethical issues pertaining to auto/biography studies’ and medical humanities studies’ centralization of the capacity to produce embodied narrative to understandings of identity and personhood.

MemberSabina Knight

philosophy and literature in comparative perspective; early Chinese thought and contemporary Chinese fiction; medical humanities; modern and traditional Chinese literature, literature and medicine, comparative literature (Chinese, French, Russian, Japanese, and North American), literary theory, theories of narrative; East Asian humanities; poetry; ecocriticism; nineteenth-, twentieth- and twenty-first-century Russian literature.

TopicUsing Humanities Content and Approach to Shape Conversations about Healthcare

Howdy, I’m new to the group and thought I’d introduce myself by sharing an article about some of the medical humanities work I’m doing:  “Finding Purpose: Honing the Practice of Making Meaning in Medicine,” is about using poetry to facilitate discussions among physicians, among “interprofessional health care teams,” and between healthcare practitioners and patients. It’s […]

MemberAmy Rubens

I have research and teaching interests in the medical humanities, particularly scenes of contagious disease in American and African American literature from 1870-1940. In addition, I research and write about memoir, professional writing, and writing in digital environments. I’m a former contributing author for GradHacker and am the designer/administrator for my departmental website and blog.In my spare time, I blog at my own site, hike, backpack, and care for two dogs and two cats.

MemberTiffany DeRewal

Ph.D. Candidate in English at Temple University (18th-19th c. American Literature and Medical Humanities) and Writing Instructor at Rowan University I am pursuing a PhD in English literature at Temple University. My dissertation, “The Resurrection and the Knife: Protestantism, Nationalism, and the Invention of the Cadaver During the Rise of American Medicine” focuses on the intersection between gothic fiction, medical historiography, and religious ideology in the early American republic, with particular attention to the cadaver as it is created in cultural, medical, and spiritual discourse. This research unites my interests in the social history of medicine and the dynamics of the religious imagination in the 18th and 19th century United States. Research Interests: 19th c. American literature, literature and history in the early American republic, the medical humanities, gothic literature, spirituality and science Teaching Interests: writing across disciplines, writing with technology, digital research methods and pedagogy

MemberTana Jean Welch

Tana Jean Welch is a poet and scholar of contemporary American poetry. She received her Ph.D. in Literature from Florida State University in 2013, specializing in medical humanities, American poetry and poetics, multiethnic literature, posthumanism, new materialism, and gender theory. She is currently Assistant Professor at the Florida State University College of Medicine where she teaches courses in literature, writing, and humanities and serves as the managing editor for HEAL: Humanism Evolving through Arts and Literature. Her critical work has been published in MELUSThe Journal of Ecocriticism, and Academic Medicine. Her poetry has been published in The Southern ReviewPrairie SchoonerThe Gettysburg Review, and other national literary journals. Her first collection of poetry, Latest Volcano, was the winner of the 2015 Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize.