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MemberEmily Jay

I’m an artist, curator, and educator from Columbus, Ohio. I’ve exhibited internationally, and have been co-curator/director at The Neon Heater Art Gallery in Findlay, Ohio since October 2016.  Utilizing both analogue and digital photographic techniques, paintings, installation, poetry, performance, and book making, my work repurposes the iconography and geometry of Italian Renaissance devotional imagery in order to root the female perspective into historical contexts. My academic research focuses on the devotional practices that surround Palermo’s patron saint, Rosalia, and the days that these practices shine light on the lived experience of women in Palermo in the 17th century.

MemberCatherine Rose Ettinger

I am an architect and architectural historian. My research focuses on twentieth-century and contemporary Mexican architecture with a specific interest in the confrontation of traditional and modern modes of construction, the circulation of ideas among American countries, and the historiography of Mexican architecture. Other areas of interest include the transformation of vernacular heritage and historic preservation. The book La Arquitectura Mexicana desde Afuera explores the way the idea of Mexican architecture as the embodiment of tradition was promoted in the foreign press and through the imagery of tourism as well as in the architecture of ex-pats in Mexico. My current work explores the architecture (schools, hospitals, cultural institutions) promoted by President Lázaro Cárdenas in the 1930s in Michoacán.

MemberJames Green

I have been a working archaeologist for almost 30 years in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States. I am experienced with all aspects of terrestrial archaeological survey, site testing, site mitigation, artifact analysis, curation, data management, historic and archival research, and report writing. I have supervised hundreds of Phase I site delineations and have crewed or supervised numerous Phase II and III prehistoric and historic site investigations. I have taught prehistoric lithic and ceramic analysis, as well as historic artifact analysis to up to 8 individuals at the corporate level. I have given knapping and prehistoric pottery making demonstrations, as well as reproducing prehistoric vessels for museums and corporate culture. I am a GIS professional who uses aerial imagery and LiDAR to analyze the terrain on a regular basis. Additionally, I have spent almost 20 years processing and analyzing offshore geophysical data.

MemberAdam Parker

Professionally I work as the Assistant Curator of Archaeology at the Yorkshire Museum, responsible for the curation, interpretation, documentation and advocacy of a designated archaeology collection relating to York city and North Yorkshire. The collection ranges from the Middle Palaeolithic to the early Post-Medieval periods, with particular focus on the Roman, Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval periods of York’s history. I am additionally responsible for the training of volunteers in object handling, supervision of several post-graduate students and for the planning, managing and writing-up of small scale archaeological excavations.In an academic capacity I am currently undertaking PhD research with the Open University collating the evidence for and questioning the function of magic in Roman Britain. The project aims to look at the disparate evidence for magic in terms of its contextual significance, including: phallic imagery, inscribed and portable amulets, Jet and Amber objects, lamellae, figurines etc.

MemberGregory Lamb

Ph.D. candidate (ABD) at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (Wake Forest, NC) in the Biblical Studies (NT) program; Advisor: L. Scott Kellum; Secondary Reader: Andreas J. Köstenberger; Outside Reader: Craig A. Evans; Adjunct Professor of Greek (SEBTS); Pastor (Mays Chapel Baptist Church [SBC] Bear Creek, NC); Solo/Lead Docent Researcher; former VP and NT Editor of Inservimus – the PhD student journal of SEBTS; Research interests include: Paul (esp. Philippians), joy and human flourishing, marriage and family, faith, work, and economics, ars vivendi/moriendi, the afterlife imagery of the NT, and the parables of Jesus (esp. Lukan parables). Seeking a full-time teaching/ministry position.

MemberSarah Magnatta

Sarah received her PhD in Art History from The Ohio State University, specializing in Tibetan and South Asian art.  Her upcoming article is titled “Common Ground: Place and Identity in Contemporary Tibetan Art,” in a special issue of the Journal of the British Association for South Asian Studies.  She is currently an affiliate faculty member at the University of Denver, where she has taught since 2010.  Her courses include Asian art history, Tibetan art, Sacred Spaces, Politics in Art, and Buddhism in Art. She also teaches a travel course each summer that brings students to the galleries of New York City.  Titled “Tibet on Display,” the students learn how institutional motivations vary between places like the Met, the Natural History Museum, the Tibet House, and the Rubin Museum of Art. Sarah spent three years as the Interpretive Specialist of Asian Art at the Denver Art Museum, where she worked on exhibitions such as Ganesha: The Playful Protector and Linking Asia, for which she wrote the catalog essay “The Transmission of Buddhist Imagery throughout Asia.”  Sarah is now working on various exhibitions throughout Denver, including curating an exhibition with contemporary Cambodian artist Leang Seckon at McNichols Civic Center and an exhibition with contemporary Tibetan artist Tenzing Rigdol at the Emmanuel Art Gallery on Auraria campus.

MemberJ. Caity Swanson

I’m a PhD candidate at Stony Brook University studying borders, bodies, violence, and war in contemporary US literature. I’m interested in the intersection of challenges and ideas that we tend to view as totalizing, all-encompassing, or comprehensive, such as perpetual war, climate change, and nationalism. In my research, I explore imaginative spaces and imagery that highlights the intersections of these types of problems in hopes of finding ways to describe and understand their vulnerabilities. My in-progress dissertation is titled “Possibly Everywhere but Hopefully Not Forever: Reading the War on Terror in US Literature from the Post-9/11 Era.”   In addition to my literary research, I am also deeply concerned with the ethics, theory, and practicalities of education. As a young Latina instructor, I strive to create learning spaces where my students and I are seen, heard, and challenged.    Because reading is no longer a “pastime” for me, I like to spend my free time doing anything that makes me laugh and playing more Stardew Valley than I care to admit. One of my major life-goals is to move to the beach.

MemberIan Kerr

 Greetings, my name is Ian Kerr and I am a history major with third year standing, and I am currently in the process of earning my BA Honors degree. I’ve always been extremely interested in Ancient history and ancient societies such as Ancient Greece, Rome and Ancient Egypt to name a few. However, one of my main passions ever since I was a little kid was my fascination with the middle Ages, particularly the culture and the imagery associated with the era Knights, Kings, Queens, Bishops and so forth, and as such I’ve always wanted to learn more about the era in general. I chose this course because it seems like one of the best opportunities I will ever get to learn about this culture and actually interact with pieces of mediaeval history first hand, as well as being able to analyze and discuss them, so I am very excited to be taking this course. Some random things about me are that I have a Siamese cat named Benkei (named after the Japanese warrior monk folk hero, who according to legend held a bridge against 20-40 enemy soldiers in one of the most memorable epic last stands in history. Another random thing is that I really enjoy video games, particularly any strategy or fantasy games, such as World of Warcraft and StarCraft 2 or the total war strategy game series. Overall, I am really looking forward to taking this course throughout the year, meeting all of you, and of course learning some really neat stuff about the middle ages.

MemberMary Agnes Edsall

My interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on the literatures and practices of Christian catechesis and devotion of the European Middle Ages, with attention to memory (personal and cultural), mnemonics, rhetorical theory, and the role of images and the emotions. I have recently published on early copies of Anselm of Canterbury’s Prayers and Meditations as exemplars of practice that drew their power from the way that they reproduced the charismatic presence of their author. Forthcoming articles address the patristic prehistory of medieval Arma Christi imagery and the connections between monastic anthologies for novice formation and household devotional anthologies of late medieval England. My research interests also include Hugh of Fouilloy, an under-studied writer whose works were widely read in his time (mid-twelfth century) and beyond.
I am currently writing a book, A Road of the Affections: Rhetoric, Catechesis, and the Cultivation of the Christian Self, A.D. 1-1150. This project rewrites a paradigm long central to the discipline of medieval history and the study of medieval devotional literature: affective piety. It demonstrates that the genealogy of affective piety goes back to the arts of disciplining the passions that originated in the philosophical schools of antiquity, for philosophers who taught disciplines of the soul were also rhetoricians who sought to move and persuade. Their methods were adapted by early Christian teachers and rhetorical appeals to the emotions became a basic preaching, literary, and prayer practice of the church. This project, therefore, recovers the history of how preaching, texts, and practices were used to shape the emotions and craft Christian selves at different times and places.

MemberDerek R. Strykowski

… pp. 574–602. https://doi.org/10.1353/not.2018.0034

Strykowski, Derek R. “Text Painting, or Coincidence? Treatment of Height-Related Imagery in the Madrigals of Luca Marenzio.” Empirical Musicology Review, vol. 11, no. 2 (January 2017) [backdated to 2016]: pp. 109–119….

Derek R. Strykowski holds a Ph.D. in historical musicology from Brandeis University, where he was a Mildred and Herbert Lee fellow, and is presently a clinical assistant professor at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York. As a scholar of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Strykowski investigates the history of composition from a range of social-scientific perspectives in order to advance our theoretical knowledge of the relationship between compositional circumstance and the development of musical style. For example, his recent article in the Journal of Musicological Research (2016) illuminates not only the artistic origins of Alban Berg’s late operatic style but also the behavioral principles that its development represents. Currently in preparation are a pair of research articles, one of which is forthcoming from Notes (2018), that explore how the business of music publishing influenced the development of nineteenth-century style. He also maintains a second program of research involving the formal empirical analysis of sixteenth-century polyphony. Having performed a quantitative corpus study of the four- and five-voice madrigals of the Italian composer Luca Marenzio, Strykowski recently published “Text Painting, or Coincidence? Treatment of Height-Related Imagery in the Madrigals of Luca Marenzio” in the Empirical Musicology Review (2017). This same methodological approach—sometimes associated with the digital humanities—has also begun to inform his primary line of research as a means to gauge the long-term historical development of a musical style.