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TopicCFP: Nov. 10 Deadline for ACH 2019

The CFP deadline for the inaugural Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) conference (in partnership with Keystone DH) is fast approaching! Please submit your proposals by November 10, 2018. The CFP is also available in Spanish and French. ACH is the United States-based constituent organization in the Alliance for Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO). The […]

MemberNicky Agate

I am interested in how various iterations of “openness”—including OA publishing models, open educational models, and open peer review, as well as open and transparent scholarly practices—might help foster a more inclusive, equitable, and community-oriented academy. I am co-PI on the Mellon-funded HumetricsHSS initiative, an investigation into the viability of a values-based framework for indicating excellence, and a founding editor of The Idealis, an overlay journal promoting the best in open-access scholarly communication. I serve on the editorial board of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication and the organizing committee of the Force11 Scholarly Communication Institute.

MemberMicah Vandegrift

As the Open Knowledge Librarian at NCSU Libraries, Micah builds programs, initiatives, and communities around the idea that “open” is a core and defining principle of our current era. Micah serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, and will be a 2018-2019 Fulbright-Schuman Fellow studying open research practices and infrastructure in The Netherlands and Denmark.

MemberPatrick Williams

As Associate Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities, Patrick supports the Syracuse University English Department, the Department of Communications & Rhetorical Studies, the Linguistics Program, and the Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition through reference consultation, research instruction, and collection development in collaboration with faculty and students. He is interested in contemporary literature, digital humanities, and past, present, and future technologies of reading and writing. He is a participant in the NEH Office of Digital Humanities’ Early Modern Digital Agendas Institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library, and he is co-editor of dh+lib Review. He was a 2015 Techpaths Fellow and visiting artist at Wheaton College in Massachusetts. Patrick joined the Syracuse University Libraries in January 2009. Prior to arriving in Syracuse, he served as Web and Instructional Design Librarian at the College of Staten Island / CUNY and Coordinator of CSI’s Center for Excellence in Learning Technology. He holds a B.A. in English from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Information Studies from the School of Information at The University of Texas at Austin. His research and writing appears in the Journal of Academic Librarianship, Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Heavy Feather Review, Prelude, and elsewhere. His poetry chapbook Hygiene in Reading (Publishing Genius, 2016) was awarded the 2015 Chris Toll Memorial Prize, and he is the editor of Really System, a journal of poetry and extensible poetics. Prior to becoming an academic librarian, Patrick worked as a graphic designer, an information architect, a community technology consultant, and a dj.

MemberWilliam Cross

I am the Director of the Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center in the NCSU Libraries, an instructor in the UNC SILS, a Mozilla Open Leader, and an OER Research Fellow. Trained as a lawyer and librarian, I guide policy, speak, and write on open culture and navigating legal uncertainty. As presenter coordinator for the ACRL Scholarly Communication Roadshow, I have developed training materials and workshops for international audiences from Ontario to Abu Dhabi. I serve as co-PI on three IMLS-funded projects. One is focused on developing OER for teaching scholarly communication, a second is focused on the development of an “Open Textbook Toolkit” that leverages library publishing services to support open pedagogy, and the third is dedicated to developing a three-day Copyright Institute to train librarians about copyright and related issues.