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MemberSusan Smith-Peter

Susan Smith-Peter works on Russian history beyond the two capitals of Moscow and St. Petersburg.  Beginning with a study of identity in the provinces of European (or central) Russia, she has branched out to investigate the regional identity of the Russian North and Siberia as well.  Her book, Imagining Russian Regions: Subnational Identity and Civil Society in Nineteenth-Century Russia, was published with Brill in 2018.

MemberJohanna Mellis

I am a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Florida. My dissertation, titled Negotiation Through Sport: Navigating Everyday Life in Socialist Hungary, 1948-1989, examines the changes in policies, social relations, and cultural norms in the elite sport community. More specifically, I examine how the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and mass defection of hundreds of athletes following the Revolution gradually influenced sport leaders and elite athletes that cooperating with one another enabled both groups to achieve their respective goals of gold medals and material prosperity. My research also explores the improving relations between Hungarian sport leaders and the International Olympic Committee, and how their relations impacted policies domestically and within the IOC. In sum, my research is a history of the politics of cooperation during the Cold War, through the lens of elite sport. My research has been awarded numerous prestigious grants, including the Olympic Studies Centre’s PhD Research Grant, the North American Society for sport History Dissertation Travel Grant, and a Fulbright Grant. I have also received several Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to study Hungary. My research consists of archival materials from the National Archives and State Security Services Archives in Hungary, the Olympic Studies Centre’s archival holdings on the IOC in Switzerland, and over thirty oral histories that I have conducted with former top athletes, coaches, and sport leaders.

MemberIvan Sablin

Ivan Sablin leads the Research Group “Entangled Parliamentarisms: Constitutional Practices in Russia, Ukraine, China and Mongolia, 1905–2005,” sponsored by the European Research Council (ERC), at the University of Heidelberg. His research interests include the history of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, with special attention to Siberia and the Russian Far East, and global intellectual history. He is the author of two monographs – Governing Post-Imperial Siberia and Mongolia, 1911–1924 (London: Routledge, 2016) and The Rise and Fall of Russia’s Far Eastern Republic, 1905–1922 (London: Routledge, 2018) – and research articles in Slavic Review, Europe-Asia StudiesNationalities Papers, and other journals.

MemberGeorge Gilbert

Broadly speaking, my research work has encompassed two major areas to date. The first of these is the radical right in late imperial Russia. This was the subject of my first monograph, titled The Radical Right in Late Imperial Russia: Dreams of a True Fatherland? (Routledge, 2016) The work assessed the changing social dynamics of the populist-nationalist radical right as it emerged in the early twentieth century in Russia. Key concepts examined were national identity, the use of anti-Semitism and the adoption of violence by the major groups assessed. I also considered the civic society projects of the far right and their approach to renewing Russia in the late imperial period, which many of their activists saw as a time of degeneration and decay. This is also something I have explored in research articles. My current research is on martyrdom and martyrology in revolutionary Russia. I am most interested in the wave of martyrdoms on both right and left that emerged in the era of mass violence around the 1905 revolution in Russia, but I will contextualize the project more broadly – cases I have examined span from 1881 to 1917. The project will explore the intersections between these violent, noble deaths that emerged in public life in the late imperial period. I have started the primary research for this, which I hope will form the basis of my second book, and research articles in the future. More recently I have become interested in the history of sport and physical culture in late imperial Russia. I published an article in Slavonic and East European Review on the Sokol movement, and I envisage future research in this area. I have a broad range of teaching experience in European and world history but my primary focus is always the history of modern Russia. My current teaching consists of a number of modules on Russian history from the early nineteenth century to the present day, and a team-taught module on the radical right. I would be pleased to supervise students on aspects of modern Russian history.

MemberCatherine Gibson

I am a researcher at the European University Institute specialising in the history of science in the Russian Empire in the long nineteenth century. I am particularly interested in how local populations understood and participated in the production of cartographical knowledge about the empire and its peoples. Co-editor of the scholarly blog Peripheral Histories? A collaborative digital history of the Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet provinces, localities, and republics. https://peripheralhistories.wixsite.com/ NEW PUBLICATION: ‘Shading, Lines, Colours: Mapping Ethnographic Taxonomies of European Russia, 1851-1875.’ Nationalities Papers (2018): 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1080/00905992.2017.1364229

MemberClaire Le Foll

I am Associate Professor of East European Jewish History and Culture at the University of Southampton, G.B., where I have worked since 2009. I work on the history and culture of Jews in Eastern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, and more specifically on the history of Jews in Belarus. My current research project deals with the national experiments in Lithuania, Belorussia and Ukraine from 1905 to 1941, and in particular how national-cultural autonomy was implemented in these emerging republics. I am conducting research on the cultural interactions in literature, art, theatre, cinema and on the circulation of knowledge among various ethnic groups (Jews, Belorussians, Poles, Ukrainians, etc) and geographic areas (Poland, Russia and the previous margins of the Russian empire – Ukraine, Belarus). I recently published a book on La Biélorussie dans l’histoire et l’imaginaire des Juifs de l’Empire russe, 1772-1905 (Belarus in the history and imaginary of Russian Jews, 1772-1905) and am currently working on illustrations of Yiddish journals and books in Soviet Belorussia.

MemberAyse Cavdar

Graduated from Ankara University, Journalism Dept. Received a Masters’ degree in history, from Bogazici University.  Completed her Ph.D. thesis entitled “the Loss of Modesty: The Adventure of Muslim Family from Neighborhood to Gated Community” at the European University of Viadrina, in 2014 (supported by Global Prayers Project initiated by MetroZones). Worked for Helsinki Citizens Assembly’s project entitled “Citizens Network for Peace, Reconciliation and Human Security” in Western Balkans and Turkey. She served as a visiting scholar at the Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps Universiy, Marburg, in 2016. She has been a postdoc fellow in Käte Hamburger Kolleg/Center for Global Cooperation Research, in Duisburg, during 2018. She is recently a visiting scholar at CNMS, Philipps University, Marburg.