Search

MemberJohanna Mellis

I am a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Florida. My dissertation, titled Negotiation Through Sport: Navigating Everyday Life in Socialist Hungary, 1948-1989, examines the changes in policies, social relations, and cultural norms in the elite sport community. More specifically, I examine how the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and mass defection of hundreds of athletes following the Revolution gradually influenced sport leaders and elite athletes that cooperating with one another enabled both groups to achieve their respective goals of gold medals and material prosperity. My research also explores the improving relations between Hungarian sport leaders and the International Olympic Committee, and how their relations impacted policies domestically and within the IOC. In sum, my research is a history of the politics of cooperation during the Cold War, through the lens of elite sport. My research has been awarded numerous prestigious grants, including the Olympic Studies Centre’s PhD Research Grant, the North American Society for sport History Dissertation Travel Grant, and a Fulbright Grant. I have also received several Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to study Hungary. My research consists of archival materials from the National Archives and State Security Services Archives in Hungary, the Olympic Studies Centre’s archival holdings on the IOC in Switzerland, and over thirty oral histories that I have conducted with former top athletes, coaches, and sport leaders.

MemberGeorge Gilbert

Broadly speaking, my research work has encompassed two major areas to date. The first of these is the radical right in late imperial Russia. This was the subject of my first monograph, titled The Radical Right in Late Imperial Russia: Dreams of a True Fatherland? (Routledge, 2016) The work assessed the changing social dynamics of the populist-nationalist radical right as it emerged in the early twentieth century in Russia. Key concepts examined were national identity, the use of anti-Semitism and the adoption of violence by the major groups assessed. I also considered the civic society projects of the far right and their approach to renewing Russia in the late imperial period, which many of their activists saw as a time of degeneration and decay. This is also something I have explored in research articles. My current research is on martyrdom and martyrology in revolutionary Russia. I am most interested in the wave of martyrdoms on both right and left that emerged in the era of mass violence around the 1905 revolution in Russia, but I will contextualize the project more broadly – cases I have examined span from 1881 to 1917. The project will explore the intersections between these violent, noble deaths that emerged in public life in the late imperial period. I have started the primary research for this, which I hope will form the basis of my second book, and research articles in the future. More recently I have become interested in the history of sport and physical culture in late imperial Russia. I published an article in Slavonic and East European Review on the Sokol movement, and I envisage future research in this area. I have a broad range of teaching experience in European and world history but my primary focus is always the history of modern Russia. My current teaching consists of a number of modules on Russian history from the early nineteenth century to the present day, and a team-taught module on the radical right. I would be pleased to supervise students on aspects of modern Russian history.

MemberAyse Cavdar

Graduated from Ankara University, Journalism Dept. Received a Masters’ degree in history, from Bogazici University.  Completed her Ph.D. thesis entitled “the Loss of Modesty: The Adventure of Muslim Family from Neighborhood to Gated Community” at the European University of Viadrina, in 2014 (supported by Global Prayers Project initiated by MetroZones). Worked for Helsinki Citizens Assembly’s project entitled “Citizens Network for Peace, Reconciliation and Human Security” in Western Balkans and Turkey. She served as a visiting scholar at the Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps Universiy, Marburg, in 2016. She is recently a postdoc fellow in Käte Hamburger Kolleg/Center for Global Cooperation Research, in Duisburg.

MemberCatherine Gibson

I am a researcher at the European University Institute specialising in the history of science in the Russian Empire in the long nineteenth century. I am particularly interested in how local populations understood and participated in the production of cartographical knowledge about the empire and its peoples. Co-editor of the scholarly blog Peripheral Histories? A collaborative digital history of the Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet provinces, localities, and republics. https://peripheralhistories.wixsite.com/ NEW PUBLICATION: ‘Shading, Lines, Colours: Mapping Ethnographic Taxonomies of European Russia, 1851-1875.’ Nationalities Papers (2018): 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1080/00905992.2017.1364229

MemberKoca Mehmet Kentel

I am an urban and environmental historian of late Ottoman Istanbul, and the Research Projects Manager at Istanbul Research Institute. I am also the Associate Editor of YILLIK: Annual of Istanbul Studies. I received my Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Washington in December 2018 with my doctoral dissertation, “Assembling ‘Cosmopolitan’ Pera: An Infrastructural History of Late Ottoman Istanbul. Between 2015-2017, I was the Head Librarian of Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations in Istanbul. My doctoral research and writing were supported through fellowships and scholarships by International Journal for Urban and Regional Research Foundation, University of Washington’s Simpson Center, Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations, University of Washington Hall-Ammerer-Washington Research Foundation, University of Washington Graduate School, and University of Washington Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations Department. I am very much interested in public scholarship and exhibition curation. I was an Associate Curator for The Characters of Yusuf Franko: An Ottoman Bureaucrat’s Caricatures exhibition, held at Koc University’s ANAMED from January to June, 2017. I authored the exhibition texts and I was the main curator behind http://www.yusuffranko.ku.edu.tr. The exhibition will travel to Beirut in 2020. My work as the Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED) Head Librarian involved in managing the library’s collection development, organizing library events, coordinating the library’s future plans with Koç University Library and ANAMED managements, and supporting both institutions by the library’s resources and services, as well as through my personal skills. In my capacity as ANAMED Head Librarian, I also co-coordinated BiblioPera: Beyoğlu Research Centers Network from September 2015. Supported by Istanbul Development Agency, BiblioPera brings together 9 research centers located in Beyoğlu, Istanbul. The project was awarded the 1st Prize at Koç University’s Most Successful Employees Awards 2016.

MemberJakub Drabik

One central element of my interest has been the history of fascism, particularly British and Czech fascism. My work, however, covers a broad range of topics, including European fascisms, British and Czechoslovak history as well as the history of Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th Century. I am currently writing a book on Fascism (definition, history, manifestations) that should be published in 2018 as the first publication of its kind in Slovak language. I am also currently working on the study on the continuities and discontinuities of political elites in Czechoslovakia after the Soviet invasion and crushing of the Prague spring in 1968. One of my side projects is also focused on Czech/Czechoslovak fascism, which has been much overlooked in Western historiography I have completed my doctorate at Charles university in Prague and spent the academic year 2012/2013 as a visiting research scholar at Oxford Brookes working on my dissertation with professor Roger Griffin. Apart from that I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to spend some time as a visiting research scholar at Wroclaw university in 2014 and enjoyed numerous research visits in London, Sheffield, Birmingham, Coventry, Bolton, Budapest etc. Since then I have published two books on BUF and Oswald Mosley (in Czech) and numerous scholarly articles on fascism, fascist propaganda and BUF. I am currently working at the Institute of History, Slovak Academy of sciences in Bratislava and as an external teacher at the Masaryk university in Brno. I also work as a deputy editor-in-chief at HistoryWeb.sk and regularly write for Slovak dailies. Supervisors: Prof. Roger Griffin, Prof. Martin Kovář a Dr. Jaromir Soukup

MemberMichael David-Fox

Michael David-Fox is a historian of modern Russia and the USSR, whose work has ranged from cultural and political history to transnational studies and modernity theory. At the outset of his career, he became one of the first foreign researchers to work in formerly closed Communist Party archives during the collapse of the Soviet Union. He went on to become a founding editor of Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History [https://kritika.georgetown.edu/], now based at Georgetown, a transformative journal that has helped to internationalize the field of Russian Studies. For this, he received the 2010 Distinguished Editor Award from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. In a series of books, nine edited volumes, twelve edited special theme issues of journals, and over forty-five articles and chapters, David-Fox has probed unexpected connections between culture and politics, institutions and mentalities, and domestic and international shifts. His latest work explores covert entanglements across borders, ideologies, and cultures. He has strong interests in transnational and comparative history and in the history of Russian-German relations, broadly conceived, as well as in the history of the Russian Revolution and Stalinism. David-Fox received his A.B. from Princeton and his PhD from Yale. He is author of Revolution of the Mind: Higher Learning among the Bolsheviks, 1918-1929 (1997); Showcasing the Great Experiment: Cultural Diplomacy and Western Visitors to the Soviet Union, 1921-1941 (2012, translated into Russian and Chinese, a Choice Outstanding Academic Title); Crossing Borders: Modernity, Ideology, and Culture in Russia and the Soviet Union (2015, under translation into Russian, winner of the 2016 Historia Nova Prize for Best Book in Russian Intellectual and Cultural History). David-Fox has been a Humboldt Fellow (Germany), a visiting professor at the Centre russe, EHESS (France), and was awarded the title of honorary professor from Samara State University (Russia). He has been a visiting scholar or fellow at the W. Averill Harriman Institute at Columbia University, the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies, the Mershon Center for Studies in International Security and Public Policy, the National Academy of Education, the Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University, the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (2017). His current book project, “Smolensk under Nazi and Soviet Rule,” is a study of the exercise of power in a Russian region under Stalinism and the German occupation during WWII. Aiming squarely at the place where regional history meets the grand narrative, it cross-fertilizes three rapidly evolving fields: the study of Stalinism, German occupation on the Eastern Front during World War II, and the Holocaust. Since 2013, David-Fox has served as scholarly advisor to the International Centre for the History and Sociology of World War II and its Consequences at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow.