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MemberHeidi Dodson

Heidi Dodson is a postdoctoral fellow in the Humanities in the World initiative at the Penn State Humanities Institute. She is a historian who specialized in twentieth-century African American history. Her research interests include community building, social movements, race and landscape, public and digital history, and environmental history. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has an MLIS from the University of Texas at Austin. Heidi is currently working on a book manuscript based on her dissertation, titled “We Cleared the Land with Our Hands”: Claiming Black Community Space in the Missouri Delta. Her work interrogates the intersections of rural migration, activism, and place in the Border South. Heidi most recently held positions as the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Scholarship at the University at Buffalo (2018-2019) and Oral History Scholar-in-Residence at the Marian Cheek Jackson Center in Chapel Hill, NC (2017-2018).

MemberEric Nystrom

I am interested in the history of technology, particularly those histories at the intersection of visual culture and work. In Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America (2014), I examined the development and use of visual tools such as underground maps, photographs, and 3-D models by American mining engineers in the late 19th and early 20th century. These visual tools helped mining engineers exercise their authority over work, and together with new technologies, enabled them to shape and reshape mining labor and the mining landscape. I am also keenly interested in public history (especially the histories of institutions such as parks and museums), and digital history (particularly text mining, distant reading, and population microdata). Prior to joining Arizona State, I was assistant and associate professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York (2007-2015).

MemberTrina Etmanskie

Aspiring teacher, current student. I am working towards finishing my undergraduate degree with hopes in starting a Bachelor of Education in September 2019. I am interested in learning new skills and techniques that I could apply to a classroom setting. My goal is to become an elementary school teacher in Ontario. My hope is that I can apply new, technological ways of research into the classroom even for those at a young age. My academic interests are public history, understanding digital history as a tool for storytelling and introducing technology into the history classroom. My goal is to gain a knowledge base that will allow me to further my interest in education reform as well as utilize tools of digital history to inform and teach new, young learners. History is not of the past but of the present! With the correct tools, the young minds of tomorrow can truly grasp and understand the past in new lights. My main area of study in my academics lays in the sphere of public history. It is interesting to begin to understand how we have displayed history in the public eyes. Although we can all view history (as it happens around us every moment) there are few moments that are preserved. Why do we choose these moments? And how do we preserve them? Further more, what does the way in which we preserve these moments say about us as a society? —————————— I have knowledge using: Twine Github Languages such as Markdown and basic Javascript —————————— “There is no end to education. It is not that you read a book, pass an examination, and finish with education. The whole of life, from the moment you are born to the moment you die, is a process of learning.” – Jiddu Krishnamurti  —————————— Follow me along this academic journey as I work towards the task of discovering what medieval folio I have stumbled upon! I will be posting on Twitter and my blog with up to date information along this digital journey.

MemberVeronica Berry

I moved to Ottawa from Aylmer, Ontario four years ago to pursue a History B.A. Honours at Carleton University. My areas of interest are quite wide-ranging as my previous courses include discussions on the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the Vikings’ arrival in Britain, France after 1871 and a thorough history of Russia. I prefer to engage with various areas, periods and approaches to history because this helps to broaden my view on the world. I found it fascinating to take two courses on late nineteenth/early twentieth century Ireland at the same time as I learned about similar events from a male-centred narrative alongside a neglected, less traditional female viewpoint. I centred my fourth year on two seminars entitled American Madness and Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts. Though these classes sound incredibly different from each other their relationship to the present (along with my interest) links them together. Given mental illness’ awareness in our society I want to investigate exactly how people treated and understood mental illness in the past. The course’s specific focus in America feels suitable, as U.S. history—from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement—has been a reoccurring subject throughout my undergraduate degree. Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts stood out due to the rising growth in digital history and my own personal aspirations for a graduate degree in Library Sciences. Through this course I hope to explore a new technological world and develop important skills to carry on after graduation. Additionally, my interest in the medieval significantly increased during my year in the United Kingdom where I investigated popular accounts of ‘ghost stories’ and religious vs. societal ideas around sanctity. Finally, as an avid reader I love uncovering the ‘story’ within historical documents, events and people. I hope to one-day work in an environment (whether that is a library, a museum or an archive) in which I can surround myself daily with documents and artefacts that make history come alive.

MemberCatherine Gibson

I am a researcher at the European University Institute specialising in the history of science in the Russian Empire in the long nineteenth century. I am particularly interested in how local populations understood and participated in the production of cartographical knowledge about the empire and its peoples. Co-editor of the scholarly blog Peripheral Histories? A collaborative digital history of the Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet provinces, localities, and republics. https://peripheralhistories.wixsite.com/ NEW PUBLICATION: ‘Shading, Lines, Colours: Mapping Ethnographic Taxonomies of European Russia, 1851-1875.’ Nationalities Papers (2018): 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1080/00905992.2017.1364229