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MemberErin Walcek Averett

Erin Walcek Averett is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Creighton University and Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project on Cyprus. She earned her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology at the University of Missouri in the Department of Art History and Archaeology in 2007.  She specializes in early Greek art and archaeology and the archaeology of Cyprus, focusing on terracotta figurines in the Geometric and Archaic periods in the Eastern Mediterranean. Dr. Averett has traveled and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and was a fellow of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in Greece from 2002-2004.  Other areas of interest include Greek and Cypriot religion, points of contact between the Near East and the Aegean, gender in the ancient world, and digital archaeology.  She also serves as Adjunct Curator of Antiquities at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, NE.

MemberAlicia Colson PhD

Patron, Great Britain and Ireland Chapter, Explorers Club Fellow International FI’10 Explorers Club (https://explorers.org/) Member of International Panel on Arctic Environmental Responsibility Member, British Exploring Society ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alicia_Colson Academia.edu: https://independantresearcher.academia.edu/AliciaColson Twitter: https://twitter.com/colson_alicia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alicia_colson/

MemberKirsty Millican

I completed my PhD from the University of Glasgow titled ‘Contextualising the Cropmark Record: The timber monuments of Neolithic Scotland’ in 2009. From 2009-10 I held a short-term lectureship at the University of of Aberdeen and from 2010 have worked for Historic Environment Scotland. I am currently Aerial Survey Projects Manager at Historic Environment Scotland and Affiliate Researcher (Archaeology) at the University of Glasgow. I am co-director of the Lochbrow Landscape Project, an archaeological survey project investigating the sites and landscapes at and around Lochbrow in Dumfries and Galloway. My research interests include the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland, timber monumentality and the use of wood to build monuments, aerial archaeology and the interpretation of cropmarks, relationships between humans and the environment in prehistory, landscape archaeology and the integration of experiential and GIS approaches. My publications cover themes of Neolithic Scotland, cropmark archaeology, experiential and landscape archaeology.

MemberMatthew Lincoln

Dr. Matthew Lincoln is the Collections Information Architect at Carnegie Mellon University Libraries, where he designs infrastructure to make cultural heritage data interoperable and usable by students, researchers, and developers alike. He earned his PhD in Art History at the University of Maryland, College Park, and has held positions at the Getty Research Institute and the National Gallery of Art. He is an editorial board member of The Programming Historian. He has previously worked as a curatorial fellow with the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and as a graduate assistant in the Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture in the University of Maryland’s Department of Art History and Archaeology. He has been a recipient of Kress and Getty Foundation grants for their summer institutes in digital art history, and served on the steering committee for the Kress and Getty-funded symposium Art History in Digital Dimensions at the University of Maryland in October 2016. He is a member of the College Art Association’s Student and Emerging Professionals Committee. In addition to conference papers at ADHO’s annual meeting, the College Art Association, and the Renaissance Society of America, his work has appeared in the International Journal for Digital Art History, British Art Studies, and Perspective: Actualité en histoire de l’art. He is also a contributor to The Programming Historian.

MemberGiorgio Buccellati

Giorgio Buccellati studied at the Catholic University (Milan, Italy), Fordam University and received his Ph.D. from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. He is Research Professor in the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures and in the Department of History at UCLA. He founded the Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, of which he served as first director from 1973 until 1983 and where he is now Director of the Mesopotamian Lab. He is currently the Co-Director of the Urkesh/Mozan Archaeological Project as well as Director of IIMAS – The International Institute for Mesopotamian Area Studies and Director of AVASA – Associazione per la Valorizzazione dell’Archeologia e della Storia Antica. His research interests include the ancient languages, the literature, the religion, the archaeology and the history of Mesopotamia, as well as the theory of archaeology. His publications include site reports, text editions, linguistic and literary studies as well as on archaeological theory, historical monographs and essays on philosophy and spirituality. He has published a structural grammar of ancient Babylonian, two volumes on Mesopotamian civilization (on religion and politics; two more are forthcoming on literature as well as on art and architecture), a volume on archaeological theory dealing with the structural, digital and philosophical aspects of the archaeological record. He has authored two major scholarly websites on the archaeology of Urkesh and on archaeological theory. As a Guggenheim Fellow, he has traveled to Syria to study modern ethnography and geography for a better understanding of the history of the ancient Amorites. In his field work, he has developed new approaches to the preservation and presentation of archaeological sites and to community archaeology. He has spearheaded the Urkesh Extended Project, responding to the crisis of the war in Syria by maintaining a very active presence at the site. Giorgio Buccellati has worked for many years in the Near East, especially in Syria, Iraq and Turkey. Together with his wife, Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati, he is co-director of the archaeological expedition to Tell Mozan/Urkesh in North-Eastern Syria. They work closely together both in the field and on the publication reports from their excavations, of which five volumes, plus audio-visual presentations, have appeared so far. They lead an international staff comprising colleagues and students from the US, Europe, the Near East and Asia and have given joint lectures on the excavations, and workshops on methods used, at major archaeological centers around the world as well as holding positions as visiting professors in various European universities.

MemberDaniela Avido

I study Anthropology at the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina), where I have also volunteered as a student tutor. I am interested in computer assisted design and its application in archaeological research and outreach, as the three-dimensional reconstruction of findings and excavation surfaces. I work in the Historical Museum of La Matanza (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) as an assistant technician. Besides surveying the museum backyard, I engage in outreach activities and also perform as a guide for the Pleistocene-megafauna exhibition. My current research topics are related to historical artifacts, from glassware to floor tiles, collected both in the Museum backyard and La Elvira site (see my publications), and also the prehispanic pottery technology found in La Matanza river shores (unpublished).