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DepositSpectral Consciousness in Post-9/11 American Poetry

After presenting an overview of scholarship on post-9/11 American poetry, my article focuses on a group of largely neglected post-9/11 poems, which deal with spectral consciousness and hallucinatory experiences. These poems not only challenge a number of traditional binaries like, ‘presence / absence’, ‘living /dead’, ‘synchronic / diachronic’ and so on, but also maintain in their most mature form a certain cognitive stability which lends a rich dimension to post-9/11 poetics. In examining spectral consciousness in such poems, my article also identifies interesting points of connection between postmodernism and them.

MemberAlison Gibbons

Alison Gibbons is Reader in Contemporary Stylistics at Sheffield Hallam University, UK. She is the author of Multimodality, Cognition, and Experimental Literature (Routledge, 2012), and co-editor of Mark Z. Danielewski (Manchester University Press, 2011), the Routledge Companion to Experimental Literature (Routledge 2012), Metamodernism: Historicity, Affect, and Depth after Postmodernism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017) and Pronouns in Literature: Positions and Perspectives in Language (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018). She has also published widely in international peer-reviewed journals, including: Ariel, Contemporary Literature, Metaphor in the Social World, Narrative, and Textual Practice. Her research consistently takes a stylistic approach to innovative contemporary narratives, including empirical reception research, and is currently focused on metamodernism, autofiction, and Arab Spring fiction.

MemberPatrik Bye

I’m associate professor of English Language and Linguistics at the University of Nordland in Bodø, Norway. For many years I taught general (theoretical) and English linguistics at the University of Tromsø, where I was an associate of CASTL (Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Linguistics). The focus of my research has been phonology (language sound structure), especially how phonological knowledge interacts with other cognitive systems that subserve language, including the lexicon and syntax. More recently I’ve turned to the ways in which the categories and structures of language presuppose and are influenced by interaction with the physical and social environment, as well as how language, understood as a discrete combinatorial system, shapes the human lifeworld. My latest project applies linguistics to understanding poetic effects.

DepositSpectral Consciousness in Post-9/11 American Poetry (Revised Form)

After presenting an overview of scholarship on post-9/11 American poetry, my article focuses on a group of largely neglected post-9/11 poems, which deal with spectral consciousness and hallucinatory experiences. In exploring this issue, I have tried to establish a relationship between trauma-related intrusive memories and hallucination on the basis of information-processing model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), that clinical researchers also utilise. Moreover, the poems I have chosen not only challenge a number of traditional binaries like, ‘presence / absence’, ‘living /dead’, ‘synchronic / diachronic’ and so on, but also maintain in their most mature form a certain cognitive stability which lends a rich dimension to post-9/11 poetics. While examining spectral consciousness in such poems, my article also identifies interesting points of connection between postmodernism and them.

DepositPalaeopoetics: Prefatory Notes Toward a Cognitive History of Poetry

As a verbal artifact, a poem draws upon a number of nonverbal structures in the brain. Even before the emergence of language, certain behaviors had to have been in place, e.g. an increased ca- pacity to bind perceptual data and process them as single events (episodes) and the ability to reproduce perceived actions (mime- sis). These two evolutionary phases, according to Merlin Donald, preceded language, but to allow for the emergence of that specific activity we know as poetry, two other behaviors must also have evolved – play and tool-making. Play supplied episodes with frames and as-if intentionality, while tool-making skills enhanced mimesis by crafting artifacts that were saved and reused. Palaeo- poetics, which I would define as the study of cognitive skills pre- adaptive to verbal poiesis, is a project that examines play, episodic awareness, mimesis, and tool-making as forming the common foundation upon which all the myriad varieties of oral and written poetry have been built.

MemberHugo Lundhaug

…Books
– The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices. Studien und Texte zu Antike und Christentum 97. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2015. [with Lance Jenott]

– Images of Rebirth: Cognitive Poetics and Transformational Soteriology in the Gospel of Philip and the Exegesis on the Soul. Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies 73. Leiden: Brill, 2010.

– Koptiske skrifter. Verdens Hellige Skrifter. Oslo: De norske bokklubbene, 2012.

Edited Volumes
– The Nag Hammadi Codices and Late Antique Egypt. (with Lance Jenott). Studien und Texte zu Antike und Christentum 110. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018. [with Lance Jenott]

– Snapshots of Evolving T…

– Professor of Biblical Reception and Early Christian Literature. – Scientific Director of the Interdisciplinary Research School Authoritative Texts and Their Reception (ATTR) – Principal Investigator of ERC-project New Contexts for Old Texts: Unorthodox Texts and Monastic Manuscript Culture in Fourth- and Fifth-Century Egypt (NEWCONT) [2012-2016]

MemberDenis Akhapkin

Denis Akhapkin currently teaches in the Liberal Arts and Humanities program at Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia, where also works as a head of Centre for Writing and Critical Thinking. His interests include modern Russian literature with an emphasis on poetry and poetics, literary linguistics and cognitive literature studies. He published a book of commentaries to poetry of Russian-American Nobel prize author Joseph Brodsky («Joseph Brodsky: After Russia», 2009, in Russian). His work has appeared in Toronto Slavic Quarterly, Russian Literature and other journals, he is also the author of several biographies of Russian writers in Dictionary of Literary Biography (DLB).  He was a visiting research fellow of Helsinki University Collegium (spring 2007) and The Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, University of Edinburgh (fall 2014). He holds both B.A. and PhD in Russian Language from Saint-Petersburg State University. Denis is an associate international member of the Institute for Writing and Thinking, Bard College (USA).

Deposit“Introduction to Cognitive Literary Studies”

This is a short introductory essay for _The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Literary Studies_, published in 2015. The areas covered by _The Handbook_ include cognitive historicism, cognitive narratology, cognitive queer theory, neuroaesthetics, cognitive postcolonial studies, studies in emotions and empathy, decision theory, cognitive disability studies, empirical and qualitative studies, and the new unconscious. The introduction traces the trajectory of the field over the last fifteen years and explains why the goals, methods, and philosophy of scholars working with cognitive approaches to literature are diametrically opposed to those of “literary Darwinists.”