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MemberRoss Wilson

Dr Ross Wilson is a Senior Lecturer in the History department at the University of Chichester. He holds a BA (Hons) in Archaeology, an MA by Research in Archaeology and History (York, 2004) and a PhD in Archaeology and History (York, 2008). His doctoral thesis examined the experience of British soldiers on the Western Front and the representation of this experience within contemporary politics, media and culture. My research background is varied, taking approaches from archaeology, anthropology, literature and sociology to examine aspects of modern history and its representation in the present. I have research interests in modern British history and the history of the United States and I have written widely on issues of conflict, consumerism, identity, enslavement, literature, museums, heritage, urbanism, landscapes and material culture. In 2012, Routledge published my first book, Landscapes of the Western Front: Materiality during the Great War, which provided an anthropologically-informed examination of the British soldiers on the battlefields of France and Flanders during the First World War. This work then developed into an assessment of how the Great War (1914-1918) is valued and used across contemporary British society. This analysis of cultural history and heritage assesses how individuals and communities use the memory of the conflict to understand current political and social contexts. This work, Cultural Heritage of the Great War in Britain, was published by Routledge in July 2013. I continued my examination of the experience of the First World War with the 2014 publication with Routledge, New York and the First World War: shaping an American city. This work examined how the conflict of 1914-1918 had a dramatic effect on the citizens of New York, ensuring that a city of immigrants, which was perceived as a potential threat within the wider United States, was reformed during the war as a metropolis which was dedicated to the principles of the nation. In 2016, I published The Language of the Past with Bloomsbury. This study examined how we use references to the past to establish ideas and values in the present. From dinosaurs, cavemen, Egyptian pharaohs, Roman Emperors, medieval feudalism, Victorian culture and the Wild West, we incorporate the past as a metaphor, allusion or simile to guide us towards the future within contemporary society. I have developed my work within heritage studies and modern history with a book with Routledge in 2017, Natural History: heritage, place and politics. This assessed how the representation of natural history in museums, heritage sites, the media and within popular discourse, can be used to address how we relate to and understand our environment. In conjunction with this research, I have also been involved with the 1807 Commemorated project at the University of York which provided one of the major assessments of the marking of the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in British museums in 2007. This work was published by Routledge in 2011 as Representing Enslavement and Abolition in Museums: Ambiguous Engagements. My current research examines the history and heritage of health and safety, the media representation and memory of the First World War, the history of New York, the role of ‘natural heritage’, digital heritage, memory studies and the role of museums and heritage sites as a mode of social and political reform.

MemberAlicia Colson PhD

Patron, Great Britain and Ireland Chapter, Explorers Club Fellow International FI’10 Explorers Club (https://explorers.org/) Member of International Panel on Arctic Environmental Responsibility Member, British Exploring Society ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alicia_Colson Academia.edu: https://independantresearcher.academia.edu/AliciaColson Twitter: https://twitter.com/colson_alicia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alicia_colson/

MemberDavid Ian Lightbody

(Self appointed) Co-Editor in Chief of The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture (JAEA). Member of the International Association of Egyptologists. Archaeologist and scholar specializing in authentically understanding the architecture, landscapes, and iconography of Antiquity, particularly from ancient Egypt, Greece, the Levant, and Cyprus, by employing traditional methods, post-modern theory, and cutting edge technologies.  Address: Burlington, Vermont, USA

MemberDavid Evans-Powell

Hi!  I’m a part-time doctoral candidate in Film and Television Studies at the University of Birmingham studying folk horror on the British screen. My research interests include:

  • British cinema and television, particularly the horror, science-fiction, telefantasy, thriller, exploitation, comedy and historical genres;
  • British ‘low culture’ on screen;
  • Horror on screen;
  • Topographies, hauntology and psychogeography on screen;
  • History, heritage and landscape on screen;
  • British national identity mediated through film;
  • Genre theory.

MemberChristopher Woolgar

I have a long-standing interest in the history of the everyday, especially in the medieval period, in patterns of documentation and in editorial work. My current research focuses on the objects of daily life, their significance and the meaning of material culture in the later Middle Ages. I have written about the medieval great household, sensory perception, food and diet, and published editions of medieval household accounts, and episcopal wills and inventories. I spent more than 30 years working as an archivist, latterly as Head of Special Collections at the University of Southampton Library, and I have interests in political, military and official papers – and in the study of diplomatic more generally. I have been the editor of the Journal of Medieval History since 2009. I have just completed an edition, with Barbara Harvey, of The States of the Manors of Westminster Abbey, c.1300-1422, published by the British Academy in its Records of Social and Economic History series in 2019. For my current research project, on people and their possessions in late medieval England, see below. I was elected as a Fellow of the British Academy in 2020