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MemberEmily Joyce Guigue

…I attend Carleton University and am currently in my fourth year of a combined major in history and classics. I have also taken courses on ancient philosophy and am particularly interested in stoicism. Post-undergrad I hope to pursue a masters in library and archival studies or public history….

I have been interested in history for as long as I can remember and always knew it would be something I wanted to pursue. I am in my fourth year of an undergraduate combined major of history and classics with a minor in philosophy.  My research interests cover a large array of topics. If I were to try to narrow it down to a handful of key points of interest, I would have to say the conscription debates in Canada during World War One, ancient Greek pottery, and stoicism are three areas of research I thoroughly enjoy. As you can tell, these subjects are all vastly different from one another.  In an ideal world, I wish to pursue a masters degree in public history or library and archival studies. I am currently taking a course on medieval manuscripts and while it differs quite substantially from each of my research interests, I enjoy learning new things. I saw this course as the perfect opportunity to do so. I look forward to developing an understanding of part of the medieval world through my manuscript as well as opening it up to a larger public that otherwise would not have access to it. I often spend the majority of my days on campus buried in course material. When I am not working on assignments, I can be found at work at the Carleton library, reading a book, or on a run.

MemberJames South

My primary areas of research are Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy, Ordinary Language Philosophy (especially the thought of Stanley Cavell), and Philosophy and Popular Culture. Much of my research to date in the history of philosophy has focused on issues associated with questions about cognition in later medieval philosophy, for example, intentionality, sensation and knowledge of the singular. The reason for this focus is my suspicion that the precise contours of Descartes’ indebtedness to Late Scholastic thought are still not well understood due to a failure to appreciate some distinctive turns made in discussions concerning the intellect in the 15th and 16th centuries. My writing on popular culture–tv shows, music, comic books, etc.–allows me to explore some interests I have in contemporary philosophy, including the social context in which philosophy finds itself. Recent published work includes an essay on Zabarella and regressus theory (in the Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal), an essay on comic book heroes and modernity in a volume of essays edited by William Irwin and Jorge Gracia, an essay on the Beatles and the practice of philosophy, an essay on Veronica Mars and Skepticism, and the volumes James Bond and Philosophy (co-edited with Jacob M. Held), Buffy Goes Dark (co-edited with Lynn Edwards and Elizabeth Rambo) and Mad Men and Philosophy (co-edited with Rod Carveth). My most recent published work, with Jacob M. Held is a co-edited book entitled Philosophy and Terry Pratchett for Palgrave-Macmillan. I sometimes blog at andphilosophy.com. For the last eleven years, I have edited the journal Philosophy and Theology. I have also begun coursework as an Academic Candidate at the Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute. You can find more information about my publications at my bepress.com site. I regularly teach undergraduate courses in Social and Political Philosophy. My interests there are directed at the development of the modern tradition of political thought from Machiavelli to Mill and the criticism of that tradition begun by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and others. I also regularly teach a course on the history and philosophy of crime and punishment. I have recently developed several new courses. One, “Philosophy and Popular Culture,” explores several philosophical issues associated with popular culture, while also looking closely at various ways of thinking about the discipline of philosophy. Another, “Philosophy and Film,” takes as its central text Stanley Cavell’s Cities of Words. Another, “Conceiving the Subject,” look at various texts from 20th century literature and thought to see how we can best approach the vexed question of the notion of ‘the subject.’ I am especially concerned in this course with making problematic the notion of ‘authenticity’ by focusing on several challenges stemming from the work of Freud, Wittgenstein, Adorno, and others. On the graduate level, I often teach a Plato course, specialized courses on Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (“Franciscan Philosophy,” “Humanism and Platonism in the Renaissance”), and a course on Marx and Moral Theory. Most recently, I developed a course on the thought of Cora Diamond and Stanley Cavell. For many years I taught a freshman seminar in the honors program on the work of Joss Whedon.

MemberSamuel Dorf

Dr. Samuel N. Dorf is a musicologist and dance historian. He has published articles dealing with the performance and reinvention of ancient Greek music and dance in fin-de-siècle Paris, and queer music reception and has presented papers at history, queer studies, dance history, archaeology, and musicology conferences throughout North America and Europe. His research areas include intersections between musicology and dance studies and the history of technology, reception studies, queer studies, film studies, and the history of performance practice. His book, Performing Antiquity: Ancient Greek Music and Dance from Paris to Delphi, 1890-1930, is under contract with Oxford University Press.

DepositThe Idea of a Cultural Aesthetic

In its search for universal knowledge, philosophy has usually been mired in its own presuppositions. Its illuminating principles have often turned out to be illusions, its eternal truths merely local knowledge, its moral imperatives the architecture of custom often disguising the interests of privilege behind the sanctimoniousness of ethical structures. The ancient dialectic between the Stoics and the Sophists continues to replay itself seemingly without end. But surely we must come at some point to a re-structuring of the issues, a re-direction of the philosophic quest. Where might this lie?

MemberPeter Critchley

I am an intellectual range rider whose research activity embraces a diversity of materials drawn from philosophy, history, political economy, urban studies and social and political ecology. At the heart of my work is a concept of ‘rational freedom.’ This concept holds that freedom is a condition of the appropriate arrangement of the cognitive, affective, interpersonal and intrapersonal dimensions of human life, incorporating essential human attributes from instinct to reason. Defining politics in the ancient sense of creative self-realisation, I affirm a socio-relational and ethical conception of freedom in which individual liberty depends upon and is constituted by the quality of relations with other individuals. I therefore stresses the intertwining of ethics and politics within a conception of the good life. My work is concerned to establish the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing. I return philosophy to its key question of what it is to live well as a human being and what it takes for human beings to live well together.

MemberDaniel Pioske

Dan Pioske is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Georgia Southern University where he teaches in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. His first book, “David’s Jerusalem: Between Memory and History,” was published by Routledge in 2015, and his second book, “Memory in a Time of Prose: Studies in Epistemology, Hebrew Scribalism, and the Biblical Past,” was published by Oxford in 2018. His research centers on the relationship between archaeology and the biblical writings, the history of ancient Israel, and how we read the Bible in the 21st century. He lives in Savannah, Georgia, with his wife Suzette and their two daughters, Eve and Esther.

MemberSean Hannan

Sean Hannan (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 2016) is an Assistant Professor in the Humanities at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. His research focuses on the intellectual history of Christianity, with emphases on late antiquity, North Africa, and the philosophy of time. While his doctoral project dealt with temporality in the works of Augustine of Hippo, his current research broadens out to incorporate alternative accounts of time drawn from antiquity and the Middle Ages. At MacEwan, he has a mandate to make use of methods from the digital humanities when teaching courses on ancient, medieval, and early modern history.

DepositThe Disturbing Object of Philology

This essay investigates a certain disturbance that appears at the moment that philosophy is confronted with philological practices, as foreshadowed in Paul de Man’s seminal work on the ‘return to philology.’ This disturbance appears vividly in Heidegger’s Introduction to Metaphysics with the sudden appearance of the ‘nonsense word’ kzomil. Heidegger’s invented word suggests that philology is not immune to its own unsettling techniques, as is also evident in Gerald M. Browne’s study of the Old Nubian language. Ironically, we can characterize the object of philology more precisely by turning away from ancient texts and toward Nathaniel Mellors’s absurdist television series Ourhouse.

MemberHeather Ellis

I am a cultural historian of knowledge, education and ideas. My first book, Generational Conflict and University Reform: Oxford in the Age of Revolution, won the 2014 Kevin Brehony Prize for the best first book in the history of education. My new book, Masculinity and Science in Britain, 1831-1918, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2017. I am currently working on a study of the influence of classical scholarship and ancient natural philosophy on the emergence of the natural and physical sciences in the first half of the nineteenth century for OUP. I am a member of the Executive Committee of the History of Education Society and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.