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MemberJuliane Braun

I specialize in multilingual and transnational literatures of the early Americas.  My  first book, Creole Drama: Theatre and Society in Antebellum New Orleans, was published by the University of Virginia Press in 2019. It examines the transnational, political, and social reach of French Louisianian theatrical culture. Click here to buy a copy: https://www.upress.virginia.edu/title/5146 Recently, I have started a new project, tentatively titled Translating the Pacific: Imperial Imaginations, Nature Writing, and Early Modern Print Cultures in which I explore how imperial incursions into the Pacific during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries shaped conceptions of nature and the environment in the Atlantic world. I am also the co-editor of America After Nature: Democracy, Culture, Environment (Winter, 2016) and my work has appeared or is forthcoming in the journals Early American Literature, Atlantic Studies: Global Currents, and Cambridge University’s African American Literature in Transition Series.

MemberCourtney Weiss Smith

Courtney Weiss Smith is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Affiliated Faculty in the Science in Society Program at Wesleyan University. Her research and teaching focus on the literary, cultural, and intellectual history of England in the long eighteenth century. Her first book, Empiricist Devotions, was the winner of the Walker Cowen Memorial Prize for outstanding scholarship in eighteenth-century studies. Currently, she is working on an intellectual history of poetic sound (including ideas about rhyme, onomatopoeia, polyptoton, echo, and meter). The project explores how poets but also philosophers and natural philosophers understood the material forms that words took.

MemberGary Hall

I am a cultural theorist working in the areas of art, politics and technology. I am Professor of Media and Performing Arts in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities at Coventry University, UK, where I am director of the postdigital arts and humanities research centre/studio, The Post Office (a disruptive iteration of the Centre for Disruptive Media). I am author of The Inhumanist Manifesto (Techne Lab, 2017), Pirate Philosophy (MIT Press, 2016), The Uberfication of the University (Minnesota UP, 2016), Digitize This Book! (Minnesota UP, 2008), and Culture in Bits (Continuum, 2002). I am also co-author of Públicos Fantasma – La Naturaleza Política Del Libro – La Red (Taller de Ediciones Económicas, 2016) and Open Education (Rowman and Littlefield International, 2014), and co-editor of Experimenting (Fordham UP, 2007) and New Cultural Studies: Adventures in Theory (Edinburgh UP, 2006).

MemberCarl Gelderloos

I joined the department of German and Russian Studies at Binghamton University in September 2014 after completing my Ph.D. at Cornell University in May of the same year. My book—Biological Modernism: The New Human in Weimar Culture (Dec. 2019, Northwestern University Press)—looks at the literature, photography, and philosophical anthropology of the Weimar Republic, showing how figures such as Alfred Döblin, Ernst Jünger, and Helmuth Plessner drew on discourses and tropes associated with living nature in order to redefine the human being for a modern, technological age. I have published on Alfred Döblin, Albert Renger-Patzsch, and the science fiction of East Germany, among other topics, and in the near future I plan to expand my forays into the New Vision photography of the 1920s, German language science fiction, and Philosophical Anthropology. Speaking broadly, my research is interested in the various ways in which popular genres or visual practices, for example, probe their own historical conditions and aesthetic circumstances in various interdisciplinary ways.

MemberEthan Miller

  Ethan Miller is an activist-scholar, teacher, parent, and farmer committed to co-creating resilient and liberatory forms of collective livelihood. He is a member of the Community Economies Collective, a lecturer in politics, anthropology, and environmental studies at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine (USA), and has worked for the past eighteen years with an array of organizing and popular education projects including Grassroots Economic Organizing (GEO), the Data Commons Cooperative, the JED Collective, Wild Mountain Cooperative farm and homestead, and Land in Common community land trust. Ethan’s current research and writing seeks to challenge dominant concepts of “economy,” “society” and “environment,” and to develop cross-cutting and integrative conceptual tools to strengthen transformative, postcapitalist livelihood organizing efforts. His book, Ecological Livelihoods: Imagining Life Beyond Economy, Society, and Environment was released in March 2019 by the University of Minnesota Press.