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MemberJason Heppler

I am a historian of American urban environmental and twentieth-century United States history working on computational and spatial methods. I am a Digital Engagement Librarian and Assistant Professor of History at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where I lead initiatives in digital humanities and digital community engagement. I am also affiliated researcher with Humanities+Design and the Spatial History Project at Stanford University. My first book, tentatively titled Suburban by Nature: Silicon Valley and the Transformation of American Environmental Politics, explores the postwar growth of the cities of Silicon Valley and the ways that their growth not only led to ecological disaster but introduced social inequality. While Silicon Valley’s high-tech companies were imagined as a clean and green alternative to industrialization, the growth, manufacturing, and economic activity introduced challenges to the region’s wildlife and its residents. Suburban by Nature looks at how local communities confronted these challenges and offers a case study for other high-tech regions seeking to balance nature and city.

MemberMollie Freier

I’m a librarian and professor at Northern Michigan University. I used to be a an English professor at a different institution, and have the distinction (?) of having been tenured and promoted to Professor in two different careers. My research focus is mystery and detective fiction, and I am currently working on a book on libraries, librarians, and information in mystery fiction since 1970.

MemberBeatrice Marovich

I am currently an Assistant Professor of Theology at Hanover College, in southern Indiana. My research is concerned with the intellectual history of Christianity, and the secular afterlives of theological concepts. I am interested in both the erasures and the endurances of the theological within secular frames of thought. And I am especially interested in how these traces of the theological have influenced the way we think about the natural world, other creatures, our mortal bodies (and their eventual destinies). My current book project, Creature Feeling: Power and Affect in Creaturely Life examines the figure of the creature in theological, and extra-theological, texts.

MemberCarol DeGrasse

I am a doctoral student at Southern Methodist University (SMU). My primary focus is on nineteenth-century American/ transatlantic literature, particularly that of Emily Dickinson, transcendentalists, and American women writers. My current book project, titled “‘The Art to Stun’: Emily Dickinson in Popular Culture,” examines Dickinson, her poems, and how perceptions of both change when adapted for use in tattoo narratives, social media, pop art, and theatrical/ cinematic productions.  

MemberMichael Stanley-Baker

I am an historian of Chinese Medicine and Religion, with a focus first in the early Imperial period, and secondly in contemporary Taiwan, China and Han diasporic communities. I also have a clinical degree in Chinese medicine, and am interested in how healing practices bridge multiple personal, embodied and social dimensions. I am currently writing a book on the emergence of medicine and religion as different but closely related fields of practice in early imperial China, provisionally titled Situating Practice: Medicine and Religion in Early Imperial China. I am also co-editing two other books, the Routledge Handbook of Chinese Medicine and Situating Medicine and Religion Across Asia.  I am project lead on a Digital Humanities project titled Drugs Across Asia. This data-mines the Buddhist, Daoist and medical corpora for data concerning materia medica. This project combines text-marking, statistical analysis, network visualisation and GIS mapping to provide entirely new levels of analysis of pre-modern text corpora, showing the distribution of drug terms across time, space, and textual genre. It is a collaborative venture between the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, National Taiwan University and Dharma Drum Institute for Liberal Arts, with contributors from Fu-jen University, Taipei. The primary toolsets are DocuSky and MARKUS. I also serve as a Vice-President of the International Association for the Study of Asian Medicine (IASTAM), a multi-disciplinary society including history, anthropology, ethno-botany, ethno-pharmacology, public health, clinical trials, and is the only society of its kind to include practitioners. We publish the journal Asian Medicine, host conferences, and are engaged in collaborative research as well as advocacy to global institutions such as the WHO, the Humboldt Forum, and the WHS.

MemberJennifer E. Nicholson

I recently submitted my PhD in the Department of English at the University of Sydney, Australia. My research projects currently span Shakespeare studies (particularly Hamlet), Montaigne, Shakespeare in translation, Renaissance books, Renaissance publication history, and world literature. I have also worked on Anglophone translations of Japanese film and my broader research interests include untranslatability and comparative translation.