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MemberJodi Eichler-Levine

Jodi Eichler-Levine is an associate professor of Religion Studies and serves as the Berman Professor of Jewish Civilization at Lehigh University and Director of American Studies. Her work is located at the intersection of Jewish studies, religion in North America, literature, material culture, and gender studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Religion from Columbia University and a B.A. in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies from Brandeis University. Before coming to Lehigh, she spent eight years as a professor of Religious Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. Professor Eichler-Levine is the author of Suffer the Little Children: Uses of the Past in Jewish and African American Children’s Literature (NYU Press, 2013), which was reissued in paperback in 2015. In this work, she analyzes what is at stake in portraying religious history for young people, particularly when the histories in question are traumatic ones. Her publications have also appeared in American Quarterly, Shofar, and other journals.  Additionally, she has written for Religion DispatchesTikkunReligion in American History (where her work was also featured), and the Christian Century Then and Now blog. As an affiliate of the Berman Center for Jewish Studies and a member of the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies core faculty, Dr. Eichler-Levine’s teaching encompasses a wide range of topics, including Jewish comics and graphic novels, religion and food; religious children’s literature; modern Jews; Jews, gender and sexuality; and religion, sci-fi, and fantasy. On the national level, has previously served as co-chair of  co-chair of the Association for Jewish Studies Women’s Caucus  and of the  American Academy of Religion’s Religion, Memory, History Group. Future projects include a book length work on Jewish women, material culture, politics, and performance, currently titled Crafting Judaism: American Jewish Women and Creativity. Professor Eichler-Levine also continues to write on Jewish children’s literature and on race, ethnicity, and religion in the United States. When she is not wearing her professional hats, Professor Eichler-Levine enjoys knitting, sci-fi and fantasy series (all-time favorite: Buffy the Vampire Slayer), the Boston Red Sox, and the Green Bay Packers. She lives in the Lehigh Valley with her husband and daughter.

MemberClaus Tieber

Principle investigator of several research projects. Habilitation (post-doc thesis) about the history of the American screenplay (Schreiben für Hollywood. Das Drehbuch im Studiosystem. Münster et al: Lit Verlag 2008), Publications about storytelling in silent cinema (Stummfilmdramaturgie. Erzählweisen des amerikanischen Feature Films 1917 – 1927. Münster et al: Lit Verlag 2011), Hindi cinema and filmmusic. Teaches film studies at universities in Vienna, Brno, Kiel and Salamanca

MemberKaren Cook

I am assistant professor of music history at the Hartt School of Music, Dance, and Theater at the University of Hartford in West Hartford, Connecticut. My main areas of focus are on late medieval notation, theory, and performance; medievalism; and contemporary pop music, jazz, and music in media such as film, television, and video games. Additionally, I am an active singer, performer, and conductor of both early and contemporary music.

MemberKristin Marie Bivens

I am medical rhetorician and technical communicator. I teach writing at Harold Washington College — one of the City Colleges of Chicago. There, I am an Associate Professor of English and a member of the City Colleges of Chicago Institutional Review Board (IRB). I am a Newberry Library scholar-in-residence for 2018-2019, a 2018 recipient of a Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC) research grant, and an associate editor for the Foundations and Innovations in Technical and Professional Communication book series.

MemberFrank Schuhmacher

Frank Schuhmacher currently works at the Department of Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces. Frank does research in Organic Chemistry, Chemical Biology and Biochemistry. The current project is the Development of ‘Automated Oligosaccharide Synthesizer’ and a Open Source / Access Laboratory Framework (OSALF) for modularisation complex organic chemical synthesis.

MemberAttila Mészáros

Dr. Attila Mészáros studied German and Hungaric Studies at the Philosopher Constantine University in Nitra (Slovakia) and subsequently did her PhD in the field of German linguistics at the TU Chemnitz, Germany. In his dissertation he examined the techniques of popularizing knowledge transfer in the computer field in a multilingual context. As Senior Research Assistant at the Department of German Language and Literature of the J. Selye University in Komárno (Slovakia), he is working on his habilitation project, which is dedicated to the refugee debate in the German, Hungarian and Slovak press.