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DepositBEING AT ONE: MAKING A HOME IN EARTH’S COMMONWEALTH OF VIRTUE

In this book I argue for a concept of ecological virtue as a condition for constituting a flourishing earthly commonwealth. I establish the virtues as qualities for successful living within specific social relations, putting character formation and social formation together to deliver a common control of collective forces that is based upon personal (co)responsibility. In conceiving these qualities along ecological lines, then ‘successful living’ takes shape as sustainable living in the ecological society. At this point it becomes possible to call back the old eudaimonistic notion of flourishing well. The book therefore needs to be set against the background of Owen Flanagan’s book The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World (2007), where Flanagan writes of ‘eudaimonistic scientia’, or ‘eudaimonics’ for short, which he defines as the ‘empirical-normative inquiry into the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing.’ Establishing these conditions in terms of the institutions, structures, practices and relations in which human and planetary flourishing go hand in hand, I seek to recover the ancient unity of ethics and politics in an ecological context, thereby outlining the contours of the Ecopolis of the future. Plenty of the arguments in Being at One comes from MacIntyre and Nussbaum in philosophy, Flannery in ecology, Wilson in biology, Robert Wright on the non-zero sum society, (The nonzero-sum moment – our welfare is crucially correlated with the welfare of the other etc.), Stuart Kauffman on the self-organising creative universe, and many more. The originality of this thesis lies in the way these sources are brought together in an integral framework concerning the dialectic of natural dependency, moral independence and social and ecological interdependence.

DepositUsing innovative and creative methods to negotiate a mine field of emotions: doing action research in a toxic organisation

Doing action research in your own organisation is a daunting task for novice researches. When the organisation is toxic due to destructive leaders, susceptible followers and a conducive environment it is even more difficult to navigate through the research processes. As an HRD Manager in a TVET college I have personally experience and witnessed the negative effect of toxicity on employees’ wellness. Due to the emotional abuse of employees special care has to be taken not to further traumatise participants in the research project. I undertook a self-study, action research enquiry in order to generate a living theory of organisational development. The aim of the research was to contribute to organisation development, to improve my own health and to influence a cohort of managers to improve their health through nurturing life enhancing values. Using a participative, collaborative and caring approach we worked within the framework of dialogic organisation development drawing on chaos and complexity theory. In this presentation I focus on how we were able to work together as members of the action learning set to cogenerate data for analysis using creative and innovative methods that accommodated colleagues who had faced trauma in the workplace. Our findings indicate that through the use of visual methodologies, openspace technology and equine grooming, action set members were able to narrate their stories, find their voice, start to experience healing from their emotional trauma and develop new coping methods to deal with the toxicity in the workplace. The significance of this research is that our experience of working with emotional content using innovative and creative methods may be of interest to others who wish to work ethically with participants in their own organisation.

DepositReview Laruelle A Stranger Thought by Anthony Paul Smith Prabuddha Bharata January 2019

François Laruelle is a radical thinker, to say the least. He started the non-philosophy project several decades ago and developed it in five stages. Now, he prefers to call it non-standard philosophy. Laruelle’s thought and the treatment meted out to it by the academia brings to light the fact that even philosophy, which is supposed to be the voice of the marginalised, can create a new marginalisation. Serious engagement with Laruelle’s thought is less, though the situation is becoming better, because he attempts to question the very roots of philosophy. However, Laruelle does not claim to destroy philosophy itself, but he ventures to rethink and restructure how philosophy is done. This book is divided two parts. The first part gives a generic introduction to Laruelle’s thought and the second part focuses on his treatment of politics, science, ethics, fiction, and religion. The author, Anthony Paul Smith, starts the book with a note on the urgent cry for finding the end to philosophy. He informs us that philosophy is undergoing an identity crisis, which is not a new phenomenon in philosophy. Smith says that according to Laruelle, the right question to ask is not whether philosophy has ended, not ‘“Are we done with philosophy”, but “What is to be done with philosophy?” This book explores the answer to this question that Laruelle provides in his non-philosophy. The point of non-philosophy is not a different philosophical analysis of the traditional materials philosophy has tended to dominate, but a mutation or recording of the machinery of philosophy itself in order to create a new practice of thought.

DepositTeaching (Music) Data Literacy [remarks]

What is “research data” for music researchers and performers? How can music librarians develop their knowledge and skills to better meet the research data needs of their constituents, and contribute to the data-intensive turn in academia? This panel will explore the research data movement in libraries and its relevance to music librarians. Panelists will examine the diversity of music research from a data-oriented perspective, and provide examples of these data as drawn from case studies of various music research projects. We will discuss who creates the data, and how it is used, reused, shared, and discovered, as well as the types of music data appropriate for deposit in an institutional repository. Examples of topics covered will include personal archiving, institutional repository guidelines for data, ethical and intellectual property rights considerations, and the role of research data in music digital humanities projects. Attendees will gain an understanding of how music librarians can participate in research data services at their institutions, as well an understanding of the expertise they can contribute to data-related conversations. Panelists include Amy Jackson, Director of Instruction and Outreach at the University of New Mexico, Sean Luyk, Digital Initiatives Projects Librarian at the University of Alberta, Francesca Giannetti, Digital Humanities Librarian at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, Anna E. Kijas, Senior Digital Scholarship Librarian at Boston College, and Jonathan Manton, Music Librarian for Access Services at Yale University. Slides available at http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/q6q4-r940.

DepositTeaching (Music) Data Literacy [slides]

What is “research data” for music researchers and performers? How can music librarians develop their knowledge and skills to better meet the research data needs of their constituents, and contribute to the data-intensive turn in academia? This panel will explore the research data movement in libraries and its relevance to music librarians. Panelists will examine the diversity of music research from a data-oriented perspective, and provide examples of these data as drawn from case studies of various music research projects. We will discuss who creates the data, and how it is used, reused, shared, and discovered, as well as the types of music data appropriate for deposit in an institutional repository. Examples of topics covered will include personal archiving, institutional repository guidelines for data, ethical and intellectual property rights considerations, and the role of research data in music digital humanities projects. Attendees will gain an understanding of how music librarians can participate in research data services at their institutions, as well an understanding of the expertise they can contribute to data-related conversations. Panelists include Amy Jackson, Director of Instruction and Outreach at the University of New Mexico, Sean Luyk, Digital Initiatives Projects Librarian at the University of Alberta, Francesca Giannetti, Digital Humanities Librarian at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, Anna E. Kijas, Senior Digital Scholarship Librarian at Boston College, and Jonathan Manton, Music Librarian for Access Services at Yale University. Remarks available at http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/1n89-ew85.

MemberSpencer Keralis

Spencer D. C. Keralis is a scholar of the past, present, and future of the book. Dr. Keralis is the Founder and Executive Director of Digital Frontiers, a conference and community that brings together the makers and users of digital resources for humanities research, teaching, and learning. Founded in 2012, the conference celebrates it’s 8th anniversary at the University of Texas at Austin in September 2019. Dr Keralis is currently Assistant Professor and Digital Humanities Librarian with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University Library. Dr. Keralis previously served as Research Associate Professor and Head of the Digital Humanities and Collaborative Programs Unit with the Public Services Division of the University of North Texas Libraries. He also served a lecturer in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication at the University of Texas at Dallas, as an adjunct instructor in the UNT Department of English, and has taught in the UNT i-School. He holds a Ph.D. in English and American Literature from New York University. His research has appeared in Book History, a special issue American Periodicals on children’s periodicals, and in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) reports The Problem of Data (2012) and Research Data Management: Principles, Practices, and Prospects (2013). Dr. Keralis’s work on labor ethics in digital humanities pedagogy is forthcoming in Disrupting the Digital Humanities, and the Modern Language Association publication Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments. Dr. Keralis has held a Mellon Fellowship at the Library Company of Philadelphia, a Legacy Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society, a Summer Residency at the Queer Zine Archive Project, and served as a CLIR Fellow in Academic Libraries with the University of North Texas Libraries. In 2017, he was honored with the Innovative Outreach Award for the Digital Frontiers project by the Texas Digital Library.

MemberMark D. Larabee

Mark D. Larabee is formerly Associate Professor of English at the U.S. Naval Academy (Annapolis, Maryland), where he taught English and ethics, and served as Associate Chair of the English Department, after many years at sea. His latest book is The Historian’s Heart of Darkness (2018), a new edition of Joseph Conrad’s masterpiece that presents Conrad’s fiction as a guide to social and cultural history. His previous book is Front Lines of Modernism (2011), about how British authors used landscape description to shape the meaning of the First World War. He has also published numerous articles on Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, Yasunari Kawabata, World War I art and literature, travel writing, and teaching. Since 2009 he has served as Executive Editor of Joseph Conrad Today (the official publication of the Joseph Conrad Society of America), and Treasurer of the Joseph Conrad Society of America. His writing and research have won national awards, and he is the first-ever recipient of the U.S. Naval Academy’s Military Professor Teaching Excellence Award. He holds a PhD in English language and literature from the University of Washington. (Profile photo: Frederick Judd Waugh, Under the Full Moon. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.)

MemberBrian Beaton

I’m a tenured Associate Professor at California Polytechnic, the principal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) campus within the 23-campus California State University (CSU) System, the largest 4-year public university system in the United States. I helped to develop and launch Cal Poly’s interdisciplinary Science, Technology and Society (STS) program, the Center for Expressive Technologies, and the California Cybersecurity Institute. Before joining the faculty at Cal Poly, I was a full-time professor in the multidisciplinary School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh (now the “School of Computing and Information”).  I helped to develop and launch the University of Pittsburgh’s Community Informatics Research Group and the campus-wide digital humanities initiative, as well as directed the Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology, an endowed research unit dedicated to the study of information technology and society. Further details: CAL POLY

  • Associate Professor, History Department and STS Program (2019-)
  • Director of the Center for Expressive Technologies (2015-2018)
  • Assistant Professor, History Department and STS Program (2015-2019)
  • Program Coordinator & Embedded Researcher, California Cyber Training Complex (2016-2017)

SCHOOL OF INFORMATION SCIENCES,  UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

  • Assistant Professor (2012-2015)
  • Interim Director of the Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology (2013-2015)
  • Co-PI, iSchool Inclusion Institute (2014-2015) [Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant #21300668]
  • Co-Director, Community Informatics Research Group (2012-2015)
  • Co-Director, DHRX (2013-2015)
  • Faculty Affiliate, Graduate Program for Cultural Studies (2013-2015)

MemberAyse Cavdar

Graduated from Ankara University, Journalism Dept. Received a Masters’ degree in history, from Bogazici University.  Completed her Ph.D. thesis entitled “the Loss of Modesty: The Adventure of Muslim Family from Neighborhood to Gated Community” at the European University of Viadrina, in 2014 (supported by Global Prayers Project initiated by MetroZones). Worked for Helsinki Citizens Assembly’s project entitled “Citizens Network for Peace, Reconciliation and Human Security” in Western Balkans and Turkey. She served as a visiting scholar at the Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps Universiy, Marburg, in 2016. She has been a postdoc fellow in Käte Hamburger Kolleg/Center for Global Cooperation Research, in Duisburg, during 2018. She is recently a visiting scholar at CNMS, Philipps University, Marburg.

MemberGhazzal Dabiri

I hold a PhD in Iranian Studies from UCLA. My research focuses on narratives of power and holiness in medieval Islamic Iran. I am primarily interested in themes related to kingship, sainthood, social identity building, the supernatural. My interest in these narratives partly arises from their fascinating itineraries, which have taken them from the eastern Iranian heartlands in antiquity down to the pre-modern era and from the Balkans to Malaysia. I am currently working on a book project, which has the working title “God’s Kings: The Medieval Reception of Ancient Narratives of Kingship.” And I am also editing two volumes dealing with hagiographies across Eurasia. One, which has the working title, Imitatio Theclae, is on the literary reception of the Acts of Paul and Thecla and the other looks at how various hagiographers across the Indo-Mediterranean world narrated power and authority.   I am recipient of the following grants and awards: 2015, European Research Council fellow at Ghent University in Belgium; 2011, Fulbright Research Fellowship, Cairo, Egypt; and 2008, Honorable Mention for the Best Dissertation from the Foundation for Iranian Studies.   From 2008-2014, I was the coordinator of the Persian Studies Program at Columbia University where, in addition to teaching and mentoring students, I organized a successful lecture series which included talks by established and up-and-coming scholars, artists, film makers, and musicians. From 2006-2008, I was the director for the Persian Studies Program at California State, Fullerton which included a summer study-abroad semester in Yerevan, Armenia.   I have been a long-time member of the Association for the Study of Persianate Societies (ASPS) which is committed to bringing scholars from around the world interested in all fields related to Iran and the Persianate worlds, past and present. I served as its newsletter editor, secretary of the association, and member of the board of directors.