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MemberLaura Vilardell Domenech

I am currently (2018-) a Tenure-Track Assistant Professor at Northern Illinois University, where I teach Translation Studies and Spanish language and culture. In 2013 I completed my Ph.D. in translation and literary reception and I moved to Georgetown University to teach Language and Culture, as well as Translation (2015-2018). My main research area is the reception of translations, field for which I published a dozen articles so far. Nowadays, I focus my interests on the Spanish censorship over the translations into Catalan in the 1960s and more recently, I also study reception in social media of audiovisual content. My primary areas of study are translation and the history of publishing. More specifically, I specialize in literary reception, cross-border cultures and minority languages, with a focus on cultural studies and translation history. I make use of archives and field methods (e.g., interviews) in my research, and bring these methods and practices to the classroom when teaching Spanish culture and conversation courses as well as translation courses. My current work focuses on the censorship of translations into Catalan enforced by Spain’s dictator Francisco Franco during the 1960s. The goals are this project is twofold: first, to gain a better understanding of the means by which censorship prevented publications during this period. Second, to increase awareness of the forgotten publishers who suffered the pressure of the dictatorship and better understand how they continued to increase publications in banned fields. In this sense, I investigate how Catalan, that was prohibited in some of the public events and also at school, was kept alive thanks to translations into this language. I have been part of four research and development projects; two from the Catalan Government, (2009-2012 and 2014-2017) and two from the Ministry of Science and Innovation (2008-2011 and 2011-2014). I recently earned a grant (Institució de les Lletres Catalanes, Generalitat de Catalunya) to write a book about Josep M. Boix i Selva, director of Vergara Publishing House, focusing on the publishing house’s series of translations into Catalan (“Isard”) and its troubles with censorship.

MemberDonald Haase

…ermeneutic Act and Kleist’s ‘Die heilige Cäcilie.’” Deutsche Vierteljahrsschrift fur Literaturwissenschaft und Geistesgeschichte 60 (1986): 88-103. (With Rachel Freudenburg.)

“Nerval’s Revision of German Romanticism: Aurélia and Novalis’ Heinrich von Ofterdingen.” Cincinnati Romance Review 2 (1983): 49-59.

“The Romantic Seeds of Decadence in Wackenroder’s Herzensergießungen.” Michigan Academician 15 (1982)…

My research on German, French, English, and American fairy tales, folktales, literature, and film spans topics from the 18th century to the present. I was the founding editor of the Series in Fairy-Tale Studies published by Wayne State University Press and edited the international journal Marvels & Tales: Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies from 1997-2013. I serve on the editorial board of Marvels & Tales and on the advisory boards of Fairy Tale Review, Gramarye, Dzieciństwo: Literatura i Kultura, and the Chichester Centre for Fairy Tales, Fantasy, and Speculative Fiction.

MemberAlejandro L. Madrid

Alejandro L. Madrid is author or editor of books and edited volumes about the intersection of modernity, tradition, globalization, and ethnic identity in popular and art music, dance, and expressive culture of Mexico, the US-Mexico border, and the circum-Caribbean. Working at the intersection of musicology, ethnomusicology, and performance studies, Madrid’s work interrogates neoliberalism, globalization, and postmodernism while exploring questions of transnationalism, diaspora, and migration; homophobia and constructions of masculinity; embodied culture; and historiography, narrative, biography theory, and alternative ways of knowledge production in music and sound practices from the long twentieth century. In 2017, he was awarded the Dent Medal for “outstanding contributions to musicology” by the Royal Musical Association and the International Musicological Society. He is the only Ibero-American to have received this award since its inception in 1961. He is also the recipient of top prizes from the Latin American Studies Association, the American Musicological Society, the ASCAP Foundation Deems Taylor/Virgil Thomson Awards, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music-US Branch, and Casa de las Américas, among others, as well as fellowships and grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Ford Foundation, and the Fulbright Program. Madrid is currently professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at Cornell University’s Department of Music. He is the editor of the series Currents in Iberian and Latin American Music for Oxford University Press, and is regularly invited as guest professor at universities in Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Uruguay. Most recently, he served as music advisor to acclaimed director Peter Greenaway, whose latest film, Eisenstein in Guanajuato, is set in 1930s Mexico.