• This essay explores the historical and critical legacy of the Rodney King tape, namely, it’s transformation of the concerns of the field of documentary studies in the turn toward “visible evidence” in the 1990s. This turn privileged the power of visibility, particularly in radical and activist practices, but visibility is a fraught concept for minority subjects. I argue for an approach called “militant evidence” as an expanded and updated framework for media activism and the use of visible evidence. In this formulation, accumulated visible evidence is deployed within larger media and activist ecologies toward an abolition of police violence.

    • Hi, Ryan! If you’re not familiar with it, you might be interested in my long-ago book chapter on the Rodney King videotape, which is accessible here on Humanities Commons: “‘I’ll See It When I Believe It’: Rodney King and the Prison-House of Video,” The Persistence of History: Cinema, Television, and the Modern Event, edited by Vivian Sobchack (New York and London: Routledge, 1996), 69-88.