About

I research and write about Franz Marc from the German aesthetic, philosophical, and psychological frameworks of Einfühlung, Nachträglichkeit, and Trauerarbeit. Marc is also a natural subject for a critical examination through Animal Studies. In the course of my research I developed several side projects about recovered biography and Raubkunst, among other topics.

I write about modern and contemporary art for books and journals, do book and exhibition reviews, and am the editor of the Italian Art Society blog and the technology manager for the for IAS website, which will launch its redesign in July 2019.

My website, German Modernism is about that subject, particularly Franz Marc, but also about the historical avant-garde, institutional critique, contemporary art, and animals.

Education

PhD, Art History/Germanistik, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand (2018)

Erasmus Fellow | Universität Kassel (2016-2017)

Master of Arts, Art History, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (2012)

Master of Arts, Information Science, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (2009)

Bachelor of Arts, Art History, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (2008)

Work Shared in CORE

Articles
Book chapters
Conference proceedings
Dissertations
Theses
Blog Posts
Reviews

Other Publications

Ein Manifest der Freundschaft – Trang Vu Thuy (ed.), “Blog des Lenbachhauses,” Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus und Kunstbau, Munich, Germany, February 2015. )

Ideological Objects: Zum Vortrag von Isabelle Graw Der Wert des Lebendigen – Malerei als indexikalisches Medium in der neuen Ökonomie, (ed.) Althaus, K., The Lenbachhaus, Munich, June 2013.

Projects



Raubkunst at the Ringling: The Story Continues

Its genesis in 2016 was the glimpse of a fin becoming a feather that ignited a strong intuition at ”Raubkunst als Erinnerungsort,” a research fellowship sponsored by the Zentrum für Historische Forschung der Polnischen Akademie der Wissenschaftenin Berlin that same December. Eventually, and with the help of many people, “Raubkunst at the Ringling” ran in the Modernism journal Lapsus Lima on 9 January 2019 and was picked up in the news all the way to the Antipodes that week with the story “Otago Link to Identifying Art Looted by Nazis.” 

On 13 February 2019 I presented this research about Franz Marc’s woodcuts Schöpfungsgeschicte II (1914) and Geburt der Pferde (1913) amid colleagues at the College Art Association conference in New York City. The very next day I learned “Raubkunst at the Ringling” had been formally recognised as a “solved” case of Nazi looted art with the recognition of my findings by the Commission for Looted Art in Europe in the annals of The Central Registry of Information on Looted Cultural Property 1933-1945.

My hope all along has been that the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida operated by Florida State University, would acknowledge the illicit acquisition of the prints by the American UPI reporter Robert Beattie from the notorious “Kunsthändler to the Third Reich” Bernhard A. Böhmer in 1940 prior to Beattie’s donation of them to the Ringling in 1956 where they have been hidden since, and allow these works to be shared with the public.

To more fully bring this story to light, I have created a collaborative book project half catalogue, half detective story, about these works. Here is the first Call for Authors: Piazzetta Provenance Project CFA: Raubkunst at the Ringling: The Catalogue in Absentia.

Write me at jeanmarie.carey@germanmodernism.org if you are interested in working together on this project.

Memberships


  • College Art Association

  • German Studies Association

  • Italian Art Society

  • Association of Print Scholars

  • Historians of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art (HGSCEA)

  • Ars Graphica / Ars Graphica Deutschland

  • New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies

Jean Marie Carey

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