About

I am a historian of modern Europe, specialising in the history of science, urban history, and the study of translation and reception in the history of ideas. Much of my research is about the history of the movement of people and ideas. Research interests include the academic and popular reception of Darwinism and evolution; the history of Hungary and Central Europe in a transnational context; the study of knowledge production and transfer in the long nineteenth century; the role of the city and urban culture, including the urban press, in the circulation and transformations of knowledge; the history of scientific societies, associations and institutions; and the effect of migration and exile on knowledge transfer.

Publications

Journal Articles


City and Science: The Hungarian Association for the Advancement of Science in Buda, Pest and Budapest, 1841-1896” [in Hungarian] Korall Társadalomtörténeti Folyóirat [Journal for Social History] 19 (2018): 93-113.


 


“Budapest and Hungarian Transatlantic Migration: Image and Agency in Public Discourse, 1881-1914.” Journal of Migration History (2016) no. 2: 352-374. DOI: 10.1163/23519924-00202007


 


Natural science in Hungarian of Hungarian natural science? László Dapsy, Hungarian Darwinism, and the origins of the Publishing House of the Hungarian Society of Natural Science” [in Hungarian]. Korall Társadalomtörténeti Folyóirat [Journal for Social History] 16 (2015) no. 62: 97—115.


 


“Introduction: Nomadic Concepts in the History of Biology.” With Jan Surman and Peter Haslinger. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48, Part C (December 2014): 127–129. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.shpsc.2014.08.001


 


“Introduction: ‘Nomadic Concepts:’ Biological Concepts and Their Careers Beyond Biology.” With Jan Surman and Peter Haslinger. Contributions to the History of Concepts 9/2 (2014): 1-17. DOI: 10.3167/choc.2014.090201


 


“Science in Hungarian Translation: Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation” [in Hungarian]. Századvég 56 (2010): 97-121.


 


Book Chapters


 


“Natural Sciences Meeting their Public: The Hungarian Association for the Advancement of Science in Budapest, 1841-1896.” Urban Histories of Science: Making Knowledge in the City. Eds. Oliver Hochadel and Agustí Nieto-Galan. Routledge, 2018.


 


“Wissenschaft im öffentlichen Raum: Die Rezeption des Darwinismus in ungarischen Zeitschriften des 19. Jahrhunderts,” Darwin in Zentraleuropa: Die wissenschaftliche, weltanschauliche und populäre Rezeption im 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert. Eds. Herbert Matus and Wolfgang L. Reiter. Ignaz-Lieben-Gesellschaft: Studien zu Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Band 2. Münster: LIT Verlag, 2018. 395-423.


 


„Wessen Wissenschaft, und in welcher Sprache? Gemeinschaften und Sprachen der Naturwissenschaften in (nicht nur) Budapest 1860er und 1870er Jahre.“ Wandlungen und Brüche: Wissenschaftgeschichte als politische Geschichte. Eds. Johannes Feichtingeret al., Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2018. 221-228.


 


Edited Journal Issues


 


Special Section – Nomadic Concepts in the History of Biology, coedited with Jan Surman and Peter Haslinger, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48, Part B (December 2014): 127–184.


 


Concept in Focus: ‘Nomadic Concepts: Biological Concepts and Their Careers Beyond Biology’, coedited with Jan Surman and Peter Haslinger, Contributions to the History of Concepts 9/2 (Winter 2014): 1-89.


Book Reviews


“Universities in Imperial Austria 1848–1918: A Social History of a Multicultural Space. By Surman, Jan. West Lafayette: Purdue University Press, 2019. 460 pp.” Hungarian Historical Review 9 (2020): 573–576.


Mitchell G. Ash and Jan Surman (eds.), The Nationalization of Scientific Knowledge in the Habsburg Empire, 1848-1918. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. Korall Társadalomtörténeti Folyóirat [Journal for Social History] 16 (2015) no. 62: 237—241.

Blog Posts

    Projects

    “Darwin in Hungary: The Translation and Reception of Evolution in Habsburg Central Europe”, Edward C. Carter II Fellowship, American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, 2018.

    Upcoming Talks and Conferences

    Habsburg Universities 1848-1918: Biography of a Space. Global book talk hosted by the hps.cesee platform and the History Department at Durham University, 17 September 2020.


     

    Cities in (E)motion?  Urban Milieus of Exile, Refuge, and Belonging, Main Session, at Cities in Motion: 15th Conference on Urban History, European Association for Urban History, Antwerp, 1-4 September 2021.


     

    “‘From London with Love’: Translation and Authorship in Early Hungarian Evolutionary Literature,” International Conference Translating 18th- and 19th-century Science: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, University of Mainz, September 2021.

    Memberships

    European Association of Urban History (member of the International Committee)

    British Society for the History of Science

    Katalin Straner

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    @kstraner

    Active 2 years, 5 months ago