Recent Commons Activity

About

I am a historian of the British Empire. My work focuses on the British encounter and engagement with the wider world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, situating the history of empire in its global and maritime contexts. I am interested in the relationships, interactions and patterns of exchange created by the British Empire, and in assessing the impact of these experiences on both British and colonial societies. Before joining the University of Southampton, I was Curator of Imperial and Maritime History at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. During my time at the museum, I worked on the development and delivery of two gallery projects, focusing on Atlantic and Indian Ocean history respectively. I continue to be interested in the role of material culture and museums in representing the history of empire.

Publications

Books

Picturing India: People, Places and the World of the East India Company (London and Seattle: British Library and University of Washington Press, 2017)

(with Nigel Rigby) Captain Cook and the Pacific: Art, Exploration and Empire (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2017)

Britain’s Maritime Empire: Southern Africa, the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean, 1763–1820 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016)

Representing Africa: Landscape, Exploration and Empire in Southern Africa, 1780–1870 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2010)

(with H. V. Bowen and Robert J. Blyth) Monsoon Traders: The Maritime World of the East India Company (London: Scala, 2011)

 

Edited collections

(edited with Christer Petley), The Royal Navy and the British Atlantic World, c. 1750–1820 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)

(edited with John M. MacKenzie), Exhibiting the Empire: Cultures of Display and the British Empire (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015)

(edited with Sarah Longair), Curating Empire: Museums and the British Imperial Experience (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2012)

(edited with Sarah Longair), Museums, Collections and the Shifting Interpretations of Empire (Special issue: Museum History Journal 6:1 (2013))

 

Articles

‘A global gaze: British artists, landscape spaces, and the wider world in the late 18th century’, Transforming Topography, British Library website: https://www.bl.uk/voices-of-science/sitecore/content/home/picturing-places/articles/a-global-gaze-british-artists-landscape-spaces-and-the-wider-world-in-the-late-18th-century

‘“A young slip of botany”: Botanical networks, the South Atlantic and Britain’s maritime worlds, c. 1790–1810’, Journal of Global History 11:1 (2016), 24–43 https://doi.org/10.1017/S1740022815000339

‘Editorial Introduction’, Atlantic Studies 13:1 (2016), 1–5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14788810.2015.1119337

‘Looking East: St Helena, the South Atlantic and Britain’s Indian Ocean World’, Atlantic Studies 13:1 (2016), 78–98 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14788810.2015.1101643

‘“This Ultima Thule”: The Cape of Good Hope, Ireland and global networks of empire, 1795–1815’, Eighteenth-Century Ireland 29 (2014), 63–84

‘“The eye of the artist”: Thomas Baines, the Eighth Cape Frontier War, and the representation of warfare’, Journal of War and Culture Studies 7:4 (2014), 303–19 http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1752627214Z.00000000052

‘Plants, patronage and promotion: Lord Caledon’s connections at the Cape of Good Hope’, Bulletin of the National Library of South Africa 68:1 (2014), 53–68

‘“Stargazers at the world’s end”: observatories, telescopes and “views” of empire in the nineteenth-century British World’, British Journal for the History of Science 46:3 (2013), 389–413 https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007087411000616

‘“The Key to India”: troop movements, southern Africa and Britain’s Indian Ocean World, 1795–1820’, International History Review 35:2 (2013), 294–316 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07075332.2012.761147

‘“That infamous commerce in human blood”: Reflections on representing slavery and empire in British museums’, Museum History Journal 6:1 (2013), 74–89 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/1936981612Z.0000000005

‘“Eminent service”: war, slavery and the politics of public recognition in the British Caribbean and the Cape of Good Hope, c. 1782–1807’, Mariner’s Mirror 95:1 (2009), 33–51 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00253359.2009.10657082

‘The production and publication of Captain Henry Butler’s South African Sketches (1841)’, Studies in Travel Writing 12:2 (2008), 111–36 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3197/136451408X329734

‘“The slavery question in eastern Africa”: representations of Indian Ocean slavery and its suppression in nineteenth-century Britain from the collection of the National Maritime Museum’, Journal for Maritime Research 10:1 (2008), 23–49 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21533369.2008.9668363

‘Captain Henry Butler in South Africa’, Journal of the Butler Society 4:4 (2007), 633–43

 

Chapters in books

‘Atlantic Periphery, Asian Gateway: The Royal Navy at the Cape of Good Hope, 1785–1815’, in John McAleer and Christer Petley (eds), The Royal Navy and the British Atlantic World, c. 1750–1820 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), 173–95

(with Christer Petley), ‘Introduction: The Royal Navy and the British Atlantic’, in John McAleer and Christer Petley (eds), The Royal Navy and the British Atlantic World, c. 1750–1820 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), 1–25

‘Global connections: punch, porcelain and maritime material culture’, in Adriana Craciun and Simon J. Schaffer (eds), Material Cultures of Enlightenment Arts and Science (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2016), 219–21

(with Claire Warrior), ‘Objects of exploration: expanding the horizons of maritime history’, in Charles W. J. Withers and Fraser MacDonald (eds), Geography, Technology and Instruments of Exploration (Farnham: Ashgate, 2015), 97–118

‘Exhibiting exploration: Captain Cook, voyages of exploration and cultures of display’, in John McAleer and John M. MacKenzie (eds), Exhibiting the Empire: Cultures of Display and the British Empire (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015), 42–63

(with John M. MacKenzie), ‘Introduction: cultures of display and the British Empire’, in John McAleer and John M. MacKenzie (eds), Exhibiting the Empire: Cultures of Display and the British Empire (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015), 1–17

(with Richard Huzzey), ‘History, memory, and Britain’s commemoration of Atlantic slave-trade suppression’, in Robert Burroughs and Richard Huzzey (eds), The Suppression of the Atlantic Slave Trade: British Policies, Practices and Representations of Naval Coercion (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015), 166–88

‘Objects of empire: museums, material culture, and histories of empire’, in Giorgio Riello and Anna Gerritson (eds), Writing Material Culture History (London: Bloomsbury, 2014), 249–55

‘Displaying its wares: material culture, the East India Company and British encounters with India in the long eighteenth century’, in Gabriel Sánchez Espinosa, Daniel Roberts and Simon Davies (eds), Global Connections: India and Europe in the Long Eighteenth Century (Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 2014), 199–221

‘The case of Thomas Baines, curator-explorer extraordinaire, and the display of Africa in nineteenth-century Norfolk’, in Sarah Longair and John McAleer (eds), Curating Empire: Museums and the British Imperial Experience (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2012), 17–36

(with Sarah Longair) ‘Introduction: museums and the British imperial experience’, in Sarah Longair and John McAleer (eds), Curating Empire: Museums and the British Imperial Experience (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2012), 1–16

(with Joan Coutu) ‘“The Immortal Wolfe”?: monuments, memory and the Battle of Quebec’, in John Reid and Phillip Buckner (eds), 1759 Remembered: The Conquest of Canada in Historical Memory (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012), 29–57

‘Thomas Baines: painter of distant continents’’, in Robin Hanbury-Tenison (ed.), The Great Explorers (London: Thames & Hudson, 2010), 72–9

‘“The sharer of my joys and sorrows”: Alison Blyth, missionary labours and female perspectives on slavery in nineteenth-century Jamaica’, in Hilary M. Carey (ed.), Empires of Religion (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), 199–221

 

Catalogue entries

‘Engravings after Scott and Lambert’ and ‘Serres, The Taking of Chandernagore’, in Eleanor Hughes (ed.), Spreading Canvas: Eighteenth-Century British Marine Painting (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2016), pp. 204–5, 228–9

 

Review essays

‘Panoramic Visions’, Technology and Culture 55:1 (2014), 237–40

Memberships

Royal Historical Society (Fellow)

Higher Education Authority (Fellow)

Hakluyt Society (Council member)

John Mcaleer

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@johnmcaleer

active 2 years, 2 months ago