• Between Continuity and Negation – Reception of the Ancient Spolia in the Christian Tradition in the North of Kosovo The use of spolia has been recorded on numerous sacred objects in the Northern Kosovo, especially in the micro region around the Roman settlement in Sočanica. Spolia were mostly used for construction and paving; however, their use in the making of church mobiliar, such as the altar or candle stand, is highly marked as well. On the other hand, the ritual use of spolia, like the marble statue in Ceranjska reka, is less frequent. The aesthetic value of spolia is arguable and difficult to evaluate as the remains are often corrupted. For example, the Roman stele in Ceranjska reka could have been laid into the church wall as a tombstone or for purely aesthetic reasons. However, for spolia to be used in the new context, it must have undergone a purification process through ablution, prayer, or by etching of the cross for the apotropaic purposes. The spolia were primarily used as easily accessible and cheap building material of high quality and aesthetic value. Their temporal displacement, in addition to the difficult living conditions under the Turkish rule, could have influenced the village communities, who were major church building patrons at the time, to perceive the spolia as remnants of the glorious past where the national history was intertwined with the ancient (early Christian) tradition. To testify to this, we find many examples of buildings which combined the spolia and the medieval building material. Churches were often built on multilayered terrain rich in ancient and medieval remains, turning them into spolia which were incorporated into the buildings.